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Thread: flying kids in, something new, and for a change i would like some hel

  1. #1
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default flying kids in, something new, and for a change i would like some hel

    In all my years i have never done a fly in hunt, never needed to...

    this year my 14 year old daughter drew the 20 A bou tag and we have been invited to a friends guide camp in the Alaska range prime with bou.

    we will be flying on short notice once his pilot has time, this will be my daughters first time in a super cub....

    i have already verified someone will be in camp to receive her, so she will fly in first, and not be stuck in the parking area waiting a return flight...

    here is my concern...

    2010 has been a bad year for planes in AK... how much prep, safety, survival training should i push on her prior to fly time?

    she Will have MSR, basic first aide kit, food and water on her person as we all should...

    but HOW MUCH should i explain what to do if the plane falls?

    the reason i ask. is i don't want to scare the crap out of her... but i want her if need be to be able to render first aide if needed and to have the skills to wait out a rescue... she will also have my spot II on her person.

    my kids are Alaskan kids... but ...

    she is still a kid, what did, what would, you do to prepare your kiddo for their first trip of a lifetime?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Give her a camera with vid. capabilty, and tell her to enjoy the ride. ( make a youtube out it.)

    Not much else you can do unless you want to pack her in pillows.

    Throw her in there and say that you will see her soon. The more you talk about the plane going down, the more she is'nt going to enjoy the ride. There is only so much you can do to protect them. Planes are safe, less of them go down than cars rolling over on the highways, Don't scare her, just let her have fun.

    He-l I've riding in planes that the average joe would look at and say "are you crazy" just look at them and say "yea". lol.

    I've got over 100,000 miles under my belt flying around Alaska in all differant kind of planes, and the cub is the one I feel safest in.

  3. #3

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    Vince,
    I would take her to the strip near you, hopefully a gravel strip so she can watch a few cubs/light aircraft take off and land. There will be a lot guys doing touch and go's right now, this time of year. If you could make the time, I would shoot the breeze with a pilot, and let her see they are just giddy about flying, it would go a long way to instill her confidence. I would also advise her to expect it be a bit bouncy and sometimes shifty, side to side. Explain to her, that she will be secure in a harness and will get to see the world from a whole different perspective, birds eye view so to speak. Have light meals on the day you expect to fly out, if possible, but don't go hungry. No greasy stuff. Motion sickness should not be a problem on a short flight, but with anxiety, full belly and sleeplessness, it can happen, especially for kids. No chewing gum or candy on the flight. Choking in the back seat of a cub is a real no no. Relax "Dad" she'll do just fine and have more fun than you can imagine.
    Good Luck to you and your daughter.
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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    She 14. I would not say anything that might cause her concern. Let have fun with this first flight.
    You contracted the flight. You planned. You have done what you can do.
    Take pictures.

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    I don't have any children so please consider that when you read my response.

    I think she should know what she needs to do if the plane is forced to the ground before her destination. She should know whether or not to stay with the plane, and how to use the SPOT (I assume she does if she will have it). How to signal aircraft passing by or aircraft searching for her and the pilot.

    I also think she should know what and where the Emergency Locator Beacon (ELT) is. In the event of an emergency landing, if the ELT does not trip she should know where it is and that she can activate it manually in case the pilot can't do it themselves. This may be part of the briefing that the pilot gives their passengers before the flight. The ELT and the SPOT may be the best way to be found if something bad happens.

    I would, however, make sure that she knows most people fly in these planes all the time with very few problems. But that she needs to know how to handle the worst situation even though it will probably never happen. And like other people have mentioned, let her know that flying is A LOT of fun!

    All these things can be explained in a way that will inform her about what she needs to do, but not scare her half to death.

    Like I said, I don't have any children and don't know the best way to handle this particular situation, but these are my thoughts on the subject.

    I hope you both have a great time. I just returned from my first big game hunt that just happened to be a Fly-In Caribou. Its an experience I'll never forget. I hope hers is just as memorable.

    Have Fun!
    Brian

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    Member tboehm's Avatar
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    Sound like some good advice all the way around. I would also recommend having her take that spot, worth every penny. While it wasn't a cub and I was there, I took my 14 year od daughter up in a 172 right after I got my license and she had a great time. Good luck with your hunt.

  7. #7

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    Vince,

    Good for you. I tried to talk my 16-year-old daughter into coming along on my drop camp caribou hunt this year.

    I have two takes on this. First, as a Child and Adolescent Therapist, I would say it would be a mistake to give her any worse-case scenarios. I would educate her about the plane and what to do when she lands, and that you will be on the next flight after her, but the other stuff will unduly scare her (or anyone) and the stats show most planes don't go down. If she was still scared, I'd find the statistics and read them to her. I also would never expect a 14-year old to render first aid to others if she survives a crash herself. If she can, that is awesome, but most of us would be in shock - and especially a child. I would only tell her to take care of herself first in the unlikely event there was an accident.

    Maybe you already planned this, but I sure would include with her a tent and sleeping bag and be sure she could put it all together alone if need be.

    As a dad, I would also send her in first in case the plane didn't come back, so I was in position to mount a speedy rescue.

    Again, good for you. I'll bet you both will have the time of your life. BTW, one of my daughter's biggest concerns was the bathroom situation. I told her she''d figure something out whether she liked it or not.

    Don Mulligan
    www.outdoorswithdon.com

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Vince,
    Nice to see a concerned parent for sure!
    I flew my daughter in on a fishing trip a few years back - she got air sick as it was very hot but we had a lady pilot flying a Beech16 and she flew us on one of the best and smoothest flights I have ever had in a float plane. So, with that said you may want to give your daughter a Dramamine pill or patch if you fear air sickness? If you choose not to try it on the way in, it sure doesn't hurt to take a couple for the trip out in case the one in gives her an upset stomach.
    I would spend a couple minutes showing her how to "undo" the seat belt as that can be a bit of a challenge in some craft I have flown in....
    Best of luck and I hope you have a wonderful trip with your girl!
    Randy
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    Vince,
    I took my duaghter on her first caribou trip when she was 14 and she still talks about it three years later. I can't go without her now. We also flew out but in a 206 so I was with her. Insure she knows how to use the SPOT and basic first aid. The only other thing I would pack with her, since you didn't mention what gear she would have, is a sleeping bag or space blanket in case the remote chance that something will happen does. Good luck and the smile on her face after being successful will be ever recorded in pictures!

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    thanks guys, she will have her pack and her gear along... we do after all always have certain things with us in the field and i make the kids have near the same...

    Don! you bring up one point that i was concerned about until i was able to verify some one actually in camp to receive her..

    flying kiddo in first in case the plane don't come back...

    i really tossed that one about before i was able to get back to my friend.... i was not real willing to send the kid out to the tundra and have her sit there alone, while the plane came back for me... i would have had her in the truck. that way if some thing had happened she is the First one reached? i don't know.... Logistically as a parent i think that is the most difficult part of all this. where do you leave your kid at.... ?

    so this weekend is gear training time. make sure she knows how to operate every thing... and sounds like i should leave a lot of the safety briefing to the pilot... I have enough hours in the bush planes to know how they are... but perhaps i am too over cautious?
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  11. #11

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    Vince,
    I forgot to mention earlier, that I would also have her use hearing protection. I recommend the disposable foam earplugs. Pick up a pocket full, because they get lost easily. Even if the plane is equipped with a second set of headsets, the double hearing protection is warranted.
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    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Wheres the discussion on laying down GPS coordinates of the double shovel monster Bou on the ride in. She should be scouting the area, afterall, it's her hunt. Tell her to scan the country well.

    I've got three daughters, oldest 11.

    I'm really looking forward to a family float hunt someday. I'm wearing out my knees for now. Heading out tonight for an alpine assault for Blacktail. I've got a friend from the USCG coming along with a live goat tag in his pocket.

    I'm wishing you and your daughter the best. Go get em!

  13. #13
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    Vince
    I am a 135 guy and there is a lot of good advice here. I know it has been a bad year for aviation here in AK. However, flying (even in the bush) is still statistically safer than riding in a car and I am sure you’re not as worried about her riding in the car. She will be fine dad.

    There is some very good advice here, good food, hearing protection, and the Dramamine (for the trip out if needed). The video camera for the youtube is a Great idea as a way to not only get the young lady into hunting but t gives it an element from her age/peer group.

    As for the preflight brief, I would leave that to the pilot. He is the guy who is paid for his knowledge about the aircraft, it systems, and safe operation. He has a personal interest (both financially and physically) in making sure everyone arrives safe and sound. If it makes you feel better below are the items I cover as part of my preflight and I tailor it to each flight as required;

    Conduct of flight
    Departure
    Route (flight duration, points of interest along the way)
    The approach I expect for landing
    Ground procedures

    Emergency Procedures
    Memory Items & Checklists - (to a non flyer it means I am going to be doing a bunch of things possibly in quick order and not to worry I will tell them what happened and how we are going to handle it as soon as I can). If the person is a pilot I may have them back me up on a checklist.

    Forced landing/ditching – how I want them to sit and things I want them to do if these events do happen.

    Crew Duties
    Lookout - (this I jump on in a big way - it involves them in the flight and gives me an extra set of eyes)
    Cockpit Resource Management – Things I may have the passenger due particular to each flight.
    Passenger discomfort – if you feel sick tell me as soon as the first hint hits you. There are things I can do to help you feel better or ease your discomfort IF I KNOW ABOUT IT!

    Comments & questions


    This is what I use there are other briefs out there but many will cover similar subjects. I hope this helps. She is going to have more fun than you know. Lighten up and enjoy it. Good hunting

    Just my Nickel,
    Drew
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    No vince you are not being overly cautious, you are being a father and a dad (More important). congratulations! and take plenty of pictures becasue she won't like all the ones of her, its just being a girl.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    Our one bushplane rule:
    No fleece or other flammable/melting material is worn on the outside layer.

    Super cubs with shoulder harness for passenger are safer than those with only a lap belt. Same with cubs with helmet/earsets for passenger.

    As Toddler outlined, pilot should give a pre-flight brief, where the fire extinguisher is, where the ELT is etc.

    Most cub pilots have plastic puke bags in the the compartment behind the front seat. Might give your daughter one just in case she is that type of flier. You never know. Sounds like a fun trip for her and you Vince. Camera is a great idea.



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    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Heres one other thing that you can do to ease her mind. ( this might not be true for all)

    Talk to the pilot and if the plane has a rear stick in it, ask him to let her fly the plane once they are a cruising alt.

    If something should happen to the pilot then she would have a basic understanding of how the plane works. ( somebody might be able to talk her down) He has full control so it's just a basic thing to have some fun and learn at the same time. Who know's, she might just want to get her license.

    I don't know what its like now, but I had alot of pilots let me do it when I was a kid. At first I was terrified, but got so used to it, could'nt wait to get back in there and do it again.

    (Takes your mind off air-sickness,lol) Just a thought.

    You did'nt say how long this ride was.

    The other thing is I thought that you were sure that someone was going to be on the reciving side, If not you go first and have a friend wait with her til she takes off.

    Good luck.

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    Default flying is scary at 14

    Quote Originally Posted by Rock_skipper View Post
    Talk to the pilot and if the plane has a rear stick in it, ask him to let her fly the plane once they are a cruising alt.

    If something should happen to the pilot then she would have a basic understanding of how the plane works. ( somebody might be able to talk her down)
    If I was 14 and someone told me to take the stick so that if the pilot died I'd have some idea (of how quickly I'd die too, lol) it would scare the hell out of me.

    Matter of fact I did take flying lessons at about that age, and they did scare the hell out of me, even with a perfectly healthy (and very talented, I found out, in a pinch one day) instructor sitting next to me.

    Being scared and conquering it is part of growing up I think - to a certain extent.

  18. #18
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    Make sure it has the foot controls also lol.

    F.M. There are kids at 15 flying around the world.

    I'm not saying to force her into it, but if she likes it who knows what might become of her experiance, she might be flying Vince into his next hunting place.

    My early days of flying taught me what I would have to do if something happened up there in a bad sititioun.

    When I was flying out to the bush, I would let them know that I could handle it it the air, but the landing would be a little rough, I usally got the front seat.

    All said I've flown in a 42 cub ( was probably a PA , wooden ski's) stripped and was sitting on a blazo box with no seatbelt and checking traps 4' off the river ,around coners and then back up to 500' til the next one, at the tender age of 8. That was a long time ago, but it was a blast.

    Long story short the only way into where we lived was by boat or plane in the summer. So Dad bought a stinson and we expermented, lol

    That was the best 5 years of my life. No I never got the cert, but I flew the heck out of that thing.

    Quick question, if you are in a stall, which way do you turn the plane so that you can recover it? ( no pilots can answer, lol)

    Nother one is if you have an engine fire, what is the speed to put it out?

    Vince , this could be something she likes instead of a xbox embrace it.

    Trying to help. E.S.

  19. #19
    Member Vince's Avatar
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    LOL first rock... NO X BOX or anyother game system in my house.. never has been.

    secondly if my kids took the stick... the pilot would get out of the plane and never fly again... they like to push the limits on every thing. she did suprise me and signed up for JR- ROTC today also...
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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  20. #20
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
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    I should also tell you the name of that pilot, It was Charlie Boyd, ( I believe the river was named after him)

    Good for her Vince, have a good time out there and take some good vid's.

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