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Thread: Upgrade from 19' Hewes to 2560 Trophy? What am I in for?

  1. #1
    Member Dogcliff's Avatar
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    Default Upgrade from 19' Hewes to 2560 Trophy? What am I in for?

    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/1860744968.html

    Price has dropped significently...

    I have been running a 19' hewes out of Homer, Seward and the Mighty Kenai for about 15 years now, and I have zero experience concerning plastic boats. Main goal is to upgrade the on the water experience to include dryer and warmer. Wanna' cruise PWS.

    How much difference between operating and maintaining a 25'/9'6" plastic boat vs a 19' aluminum?

    Do you own one like this? What do you love/hate about it?

    Thanks,

    DC

  2. #2

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    I bought an Osprey from a fella on this board. Never had a boat previously. I waxed it this spring and will wax it again this fall. Not done anything extra past that cept for some engine maintenance. Seems pretty easy to me thus far.

    Dan

    P.S. Sorry, forgot to note while on phone, but I really like how it rides compared to the few metal charter boats I've been out on. Much quieter and doesn't seem to pound as much either. I'm sure tho, those really nice spendy Alu boats are quite comparible, but geez, I can't afford that at all...

  3. #3
    Member ocnfish's Avatar
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    I had a 22 Seraider "spam can" from 2000 to 2003, at that time I went "PLASTIC" ...

    The Raider would haul kids on tubes & skis around Big Lake, it was a good bay boat but not a big water water boat. Traided it for a 26 Osprey long cabin, yes ... flush toilets, fridg, sink with running water, dry heat indoors, sleep four, 450 mile range and a deep water hull. If you get a Trophy with a cabin it will be a lot warmer than aluminum. Thing is the number of systems on a bigger plastic boat, I have 5 pumps that could go bad, Wench to lift the anchor, inboard with a cooling system, trim tabs, duoprop outdrive and wireing all over the place, a 1800 watt inverter to run the coffee pot and curling irons . All of these things in a salt marine environment have to be maintained, repaired, replaced from time to time. Yes, you need to clean the boat and wax at least once a year. You will get dock rash, somebody will miss with the gaff and chip the gell coat, CAC Plastics in Wasilla took care of all this last year for about 800 bucks ... the 2003 boat looks new now. I set aside about $2,000.00 per year for maintenance and probably spend that same amount in fuel for a fishing season.

    You are making a comittment to salt water, it will cost more than a simple aluminum outboard rig. You gain longer range, overnight adventures and a shot at some world class fishing and seeing all the big time marine life outside the bay. You need to upgrade your skills as well, GPS, radar navagation when you are 100 miles out and not another boat in sight.

    Would I do it again .... you betcha

  4. #4
    Member Dupont Spinner's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dogcliff View Post
    http://anchorage.craigslist.org/boa/1860744968.html

    Price has dropped significently...

    I have been running a 19' hewes out of Homer, Seward and the Mighty Kenai for about 15 years now, and I have zero experience concerning plastic boats. Main goal is to upgrade the on the water experience to include dryer and warmer. Wanna' cruise PWS.

    How much difference between operating and maintaining a 25'/9'6" plastic boat vs a 19' aluminum?

    Do you own one like this? What do you love/hate about it?

    Thanks,

    DC
    1st remember if it is 9'6" wide you are REQUIRED to have oversize sign, a flashy yellow light, PERMIT and know the dates/times you are allowed to tow.

    Make sure you have a current survey done, to include the engine. These guys know where and how to find bad spots.

    Now after all that you will really enjoy the heavier hull, having the extra emenities, doing it all while staying dry, staying out on the water, going into the cabin to take a nap during tide change etc, etc. The other thing is learning to dock or launch in cross winds will take patience. If you don't already have one get a good boat hook pole.

    I had some reservations when I went to my 2859 but there is not much else out there that I would readily trade off to. I started out with a 18' Bayrunner, to a 25' Boston Whaler, to a 26' Larsen w/ Cuddy Cabin to my 2859 with having it all.

  5. #5
    Member oldmil007's Avatar
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    quote : Dupont

    "Make sure you have a current survey done, to include the engine. These guys know where and how to find bad spots."

    Amen to that.

    I've been fixing boats for a profession for twenty years. A survey is WELL worth the $.

    - Jay

  6. #6
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    DC,
    I own one of these. 2560 or more commonly known 2556 (same boat) are quite popular up here. You'll notice several in Whittier harbor. I operated mine in PWS for 2 seasons now. As with any boat, there are compromises, but here's my take..

    LOVE:
    1. Flybridge. There is nothing like running the boat from up there, I prefer it to the lower helm even in the marginal weather. Great visibility, makes docking/undocking a breeze. You can spot stuff on the water (buoys, logs, birds) much better from up there. Provides for excellent storage too. I keep my generator, shrimp pots, buoys, gas cans up there.
    2. Wide beam. Stable on the water, not much rocking side-to-side or leaning while underway. Sleeps 6 adults. I've slept 3 big guys in the v-berth alone. One can sleep at the dinette without taking down the table - convenient. With the settee down and side cushions removed, there is by far more room/width for 2 adults to sleep than in any 8.5 ft beam cruiser. Plus you have a mid-berth under the dinette where another person can sleep; good storage area too.
    3. Cockpit. Self-bailing deck. Good amount of room for fishing, shrimping, couple of chairs, tackle, etc. Flat floor - no hump for the engine. Nice-sized fish box, but I keep my fish in a big cooler on the swim step.
    4. Head. Good size enclosed stand up head with shower and sink w/ hot/cold water. Extra storage there too.
    5. Lots of storage. You'll be able to take 3-4 times as much stuff compared to a 19' aluminum
    6. Heavy fiberglass. Cuts nicely through 3-4' chop, doesn't punish the occupants like a smaller aluminum would. Stays warm in the cabin at night.
    7. Layout/accommodations. As already mentioned above, lots of room inside. Full galley with extra countertop space. Hot/cold water, AC/DC fridge, etc. You can seat 4-5 guys around the table for dinner plus one more at the lower helm. All can enjoy a drink/conversation at the same eye level inside a warm cabin while on the hook in a remote bay.

    DISLIKE:
    1. Flybridge. No easy place to store your dingy. I ended up carrying mine (10' rib) stood up at an angle b/w flybridge & bottom of transom.
    2. Wide beam. Yes, you need the permits, but you also lose some fuel economy with this rather short and wide hull. The best I ever got was about 2.2 mpg. That is with newer fuel-injected 5.7/duoprop. It can realistically be closer to 1.5 mpg with the one you are looking at.
    3. Heavy fiberglass, accommodates lots of junk. Towing dry weight can be close to 9000lbs. With full fuel, water, gear, etc. for multi-day trip, it's pretty heavy on the water. With my newer engine/outdrive combo, I usually cruise 25-30mph with top speed of 37mph.
    4. Bayliner. Can't really compare it to the premium brands like Sea Sport or Osprey, but it gets the job done for 1/4 cost. I had mine in 6-7ft seas and it did alright.
    5. Carpet in the cabin. Easy to drag the mess inside.
    6. Gas tank capacity of only 105 gallons. Have to carry jerry cans to extend range. We've been to Montague and Latouche on overnight trips though.

    I think this boat does many things right and is a good fit for what we do in PWS on multi-day trips w/ family and friends. I saw the boat you are looking at and it appears to be in good condition. Still, get a survey if you can. I'm not sure what kind of engine it has, but 7.4 is better.
    I'll be happy to answer any questions you may have. Not sure if I'm set up for PM.

  7. #7
    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    I upgraded from a 19ft Hewes to a 2359 Trophy. My main reason for upgrading was that I wanted a smoother ride. I fish mainly out of Seward and we all know what the ride back to port in the afternoon can be like! While is am definitely happy with the smoother ride, I wasn't prepared for the difference in fuel economy. These heavy boats drink a lot of gas!!! If you don't already have a fuel managemnet system installed, put that near the top of your list.

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