Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Halibut lures in deeper water?

  1. #1

    Default Halibut lures in deeper water?

    I love using lures in general but was told that fishing those big grub type jigs in deeper water will yield poor results. In theory, i would think angle is more important than depth as far as hook setting goes. Any opinions as i am sort of new to halibut fishing and would rather shorten my learning curve?

    Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Member big_dog60's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    between wasilla and palmer
    Posts
    1,061

    Default

    Hmm I don't know. What do you mean by poor results? fish comming off the hook? Fewer bites?
    Could it be that the jigs are less visible?

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    What do you consider deep?

    I've taken fish at 400' with your typical halibut jigs, and didn't have any problems using them. Braided line is essential due to lack of stretch, but asside from that, the only reason I'll use a conventional bait halibut setup is if all my jigging rods are being used by other people on my boat.

  4. #4

    Default

    By deeper water i mean over 200 feet. The logic behind the persons advice was that setting the hook becomes more of a problem due to the lack of sensitivity you would feel in deeper water, therfore you would have trouble knowing when to set the hook. Its good to hear otherwise though. I guess I will see for myself this weekend.

  5. #5

    Default

    FWIW, one of my favorite jigging spots for hali (and most productive) is 320ft. And, the bigger hali usually set the hook themselves when they gulp in the grub and take off. I tip my grubs with salmon belly.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    731

    Default jigs

    i have found jigs to be deadly at almost any depth. when the herring is not getting the bite, jigs can be very good.

  7. #7
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    It depends on the Halibut bite. If they are biting real well, i.e they are actively feeding, you can put down any jig or bait and they'll be all over it.

    If they are biting real finicky, your jigs will need to be smaller. Use as light of a leadhead as possible. Always. Fish off the bottom when tide is slack. Bigger fish will go 6-10 feet off the bottom to feed. If you fish directly on bottom with jigs at slack you'll snag alot of them.

    Red with White is a great color.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  8. #8
    Member moose-head's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    @ Seminary, Dubuque Ia
    Posts
    839

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elhewman View Post
    as far as hook setting goes. Any opinions as i am sort of new to halibut fishing and would rather shorten my learning curve?
    The circle hooks that people most often use for Herring are designed to set themselves, so you don't have to do anything and the fish should hook itself. jigs have a different hook style, and might have a lower hooking percentage. With the lack of line strech in braided line I don't think that depth is too big of a deal.
    If you board the wrong train, it is no use running along the corridor in the other direction.
    Dietrich Bonhoeffer

  9. #9
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Personally I wouldn't want to use a baited circle hook in deep water. People new to fishing for halibut often get excited and try and set the hook, which pulls it out of the fishes mouth vs. allowing it to set itself. Then you have an unbaited hook with a heavy wait, and have to reel up and re-bait.

    Jigs are always fishing, so if you miss a bite, you keep on jigging and you're still fishing. I don't buy the sentiment that you won't be able to sense a bight at depths so long as you are using braided line. I can feel the type of bottom I'm dropping a jig on, so if you can feel the difference between mud, or sand or rock, you'll not have a problem detecting a bite and setting the hook.

  10. #10
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Juneau
    Posts
    1,098

    Default

    The only problem I've ever had fishing any type of gear at depth (300+) deals more with a strong current and not being able to hold bottom. If you're using braided line as long as you can find bottom you'll feel fish just fine. I agree with 270, it is nice to sweeten the jib with a strip of salmon belly.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    People new to fishing for halibut often get excited and try and set the hook, which pulls it out of the fishes mouth vs. allowing it to set it.
    Probably the most common mistake for circle hook fishing. "Paul H", I can tell just from reading your "jig" posts you are way more advanced in it than I am. If I'm catching fish on bait/circles, is it reasonable to think there will be a jig bite in the same area? (I realize that might sound stupid to you but....)

  12. #12
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by moose-head View Post
    The circle hooks that people most often use for Herring are designed to set themselves, so you don't have to do anything and the fish should hook itself. jigs have a different hook style, and might have a lower hooking percentage. With the lack of line strech in braided line I don't think that depth is too big of a deal.
    Not entirely true. If you don't "set the hook" on Circle hooks you'll never get it pierced through their lip. They'll feel the steel eventually and spit it out. You just have to be able to feel the difference between when a fish is chewing and when he is chomping and trying to run with the bait. It's not that hard.
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  13. #13
    Member pike_palace's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    the 907
    Posts
    2,326

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homertime View Post
    Probably the most common mistake for circle hook fishing. "Paul H", I can tell just from reading your "jig" posts you are way more advanced in it than I am. If I'm catching fish on bait/circles, is it reasonable to think there will be a jig bite in the same area? (I realize that might sound stupid to you but....)
    Attachment 37448Attachment 37447

    Sometimes the fish will bite real lightly on circle hooks and bait and then jigs really don't make a difference. BUT, if the fish are biting real well on circle hook rigs, a jig should be devestating. The first two were caught in 100' of water, the bigger one on circle hook and big whole herring (foot long). The two smaller ones on a red/white boneyard jig. It seems your bigger fish, don't know why, but they will hit bait more often than jigs. We've caught 5 fish over 70# on our boat and not one has come off a jig... yet they bit bait while a jig was fishing....
    "Ya can't stop a bad guy with a middle finger and a bag of quarters!!!!"- Ted Nugent.

  14. #14

    Default

    Put a trailing hook on your jig and your hook set rate will increase

  15. #15
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    5,594

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homertime View Post
    Probably the most common mistake for circle hook fishing. "Paul H", I can tell just from reading your "jig" posts you are way more advanced in it than I am. If I'm catching fish on bait/circles, is it reasonable to think there will be a jig bite in the same area? (I realize that might sound stupid to you but....)
    Whether on a charter or my own boat, I've never seen a baited circle hook outfish a jig. Once you start jigging, you won't go back to weights and bait, especially in K bay with the large tide swings. There are times where a jig will catch fish while bait won't even garner a bit. I've also been on a very active chicken patch where I'd drop to the bottom, reel up 2 or 3 cranks, and on the second or third jig have a bite, and I threw back about 20 fish trying for a big one.

    You don't have to get a dedicated jigging rod/reel, I was using a lamiglass butt rod w/ a penn 4/0 special senator when I started jigging. Now I use lighter rods/reels as they are so much more enjoyable to fish with.

  16. #16

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post
    I can feel the type of bottom I'm dropping a jig on, so if you can feel the difference between mud, or sand or rock, you'll not have a problem detecting a bite and setting the hook.
    Ditto. If you can tell what type of bottom you are fishing on from 200+ feet, you won't have any issue with being able to Set the hook.

    Use the braided line and the 'stretching' or 'sensitivity' issues you mention become obsolete.

    -- Gambler

  17. #17

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Homertime View Post
    If I'm catching fish on bait/circles, is it reasonable to think there will be a jig bite in the same area? (I realize that might sound stupid to you but....)
    I find that Jigging becomes much more productive if you have some type of a scent trail being produced; i.e. if other people on the boat are fishing bait. In this scenario, I agree with Paul H in that the Jig Fisherman will outfish the Bait Fisherman hands down.

    -- Gambler

  18. #18

    Default

    Totally true... if you use braid jigging in deeper water is fine... and very productive.
    Alaska Fishing Forums : They are my addiction!

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •