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Thread: roma strike-out

  1. #1

    Default roma strike-out

    this is the second year running that we have had great success with all tomato varieties except romas. big healthy plants that simply do not set fruit. plenty of pollinators doing their thing, lots of flowers, and like i mentioned, all other varieties are bearing fruit nicely. has anyone expirienced similar problems? i owned and operated a commercial greenhouse a few years ago and grew massive quantities of romas, so i know they like the grhouse envorinment. what gives?

  2. #2
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    Same source of seeds as last year? Possibly a played-out, old and tired hybrid/seed stock/source that was less than stable to start with?

    Negative recessive traits in the plant's genetics?

    If the source of seeds was clearly different between the two years, then there's another issue at work.

    Are they in the same beds/soil/medium as last year's romas were??

  3. #3

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    different seed stock, different F1 roma variety. same beds as last year, but different locations.

  4. #4
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    Are there other healthy tomato plants putting forth fruit in -that- same bed, either in the location the romas were in last year, or very near to where they are this year??

    If so, then I'd next guess that perhaps you have a nutrient or other issue such as ph that your other tomatoes aren't as susceptible or vulnerable to, but which affects the romas moreso for what ever reason. Each plant has its own tolerances, from hybrid to hybrid, and so forth.

    I'm not sure what else it could be, unless there's an odd-ball chance of significant improbability that you just happened to get two different seed sources' seeds that exhibited the very same disorders; again, highly unlikely, unless one of the sources is vending for the other, and they're actually the same seeds, but from two different vendors.

    A stumper, for sure.

  5. #5

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    i think ive got it. read up on pollination and learned that some varieties are more sensitive to day/night temp differential. nighttime temps of 55 or below can cause the pollen to become too sticky to transport. here in homer we had a cool summer and regularly had nights cooler than that, so im guessing that it my problem. romas must be more sensitive, as my sweet million, pear, and brandywine varieties have all set fruit. thanks for looking.

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