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Thread: How to cut foam for outhouse insulation???

  1. #1
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    Default How to cut foam for outhouse insulation???

    Hello,

    New to this site but figured I would asked anyways.

    We are in the middle of building an outhouse behind our small cabin in up near Petersville and I have been tasked with the job of insulating the outhouse somewhat (yes including the toilet seat of course) . Anyways, I am having a hard time finding the best way to cut clean edges on the foam insulation. Does anyone have any tips or tools that work best for dealing with and cutting foam insulation. Also how deep of foam insulation I should get?? I am thinking 2" is that getting carried away??

    Thanks all for any info.

  2. #2

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    I have had good results from a serrated fillet knife.

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  4. #4
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    the hot wire foam cutter is the best but for just a few bucks the serrated knife will work fine. 2 inch foam is not overkill as I cant recall off hand but the R value for it I believe is around 10
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

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    Member moose-head's Avatar
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    A serreaded knife would work well. You can also get razor knives that have a break away tip and use those with a longish metal straight edge. If you are cutting arcs or circles it works well if you cut out the part you are trying to remove in pieces so that you are only worried about a small amount of material at a time.
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  6. #6

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    I have found that a cheap electric kife works wonders for foam up to 6" thick--even arcs and circles can be easily managed.
    Rich
    I give thanks to the vetrans, as they have aided in my priviledge to hunt and fish the great State of AK. and alow me to sleep safely at night.

  7. #7

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    thats "knife" for all the spell checkers..lol
    I give thanks to the vetrans, as they have aided in my priviledge to hunt and fish the great State of AK. and alow me to sleep safely at night.

  8. #8
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    Default use only a utility knife

    Snap a line, then put a new blade in your utility knife and cut your 2" foam carefully on your line the first time, and then once more as deep as that little blade will reach (almost an inch). Then just break it and it'll break clean. Much easier than physically cutting all the way through.

    I've got a project going on here using that stuff, and I tried both ways myself just yesterday.

  9. #9
    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Best way for blueboard is to take a putty knife, rounded back side of a 6" drywall knife. or a 7 way paint scraper agents a straight edge and score it an inch or so deep then snap it like sheet rock. For faced polystyrene use a utility knife scoring the plastic side then snap and cut the foil in the fold like sheetrock. For the big 12x24x96 polystyrene blocks a hotwire along guides is the best way but a sawzall and long blade works well if a bit messy.
    Andy
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  10. #10
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    Thanks everyone for the suggestions. I'll see if I can keep from making it look hideous, though I have to remind myself this is just an outhouse right?? Thanks again all.

  11. #11
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    I've used a table saw to make lots of longer cuts, and used a sharp, thin bladed butcher/general purpose knife (mines a Russell Green River "ripper" style)for cuts with good success as well. A slight bow to the board makes the knife cut well without much drag, tho it isnt very hard to cut even without the bowing. For thicker board, a couple passes with the Green River does the trick nicely. Having a low angle to the blade helps, not a square angle of attack to the board.

  12. #12

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    I suggest making two of the seat rings from the blueboard. Keep them swapped out and put one on a nail for drying.
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