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Thread: 21y/o pilot looking for work and experience!

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    Smile 21y/o pilot looking for work and experience!

    Hey Everyone,

    My name is Alex Golembiewski, I'm from Roseville, Michigan, about 15 minutes north of Detroit. I currently am a aviation student at Western Michigan University and will be graduating in April 2011 with a double-major in aviation flight science and administration. I have my single and multi-engine land commercial pilots license with an instrument rating. I have always loved the outdoors and am intrigued by everything Alaska has to offer. After graduation I am looking to move to Alaska and find work dealing with anything aviation, including the business side. I am willing to make nearly any reasonable sacrifice to make this goal a real opportunity! I have a personal website, www.sigeppilot.com with more information about myself, as well as my up-to-date resume. Thank you for taking the time to read this!

    Alex Golembiewski
    Sigeppilot@gmail.com

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    Hi Alex,

    The FAA minimum pilot experience requirements to fly as PIC (pilot-in-command) under FARs Part135 is 500 hours. This is not an insurance requirement. It is the legal minimum experience required by federal law. 100 hours of the 500 hours has to be cross-country time, and of that 100 hours, 25 hours has to be night cross country. http://www.flightsimaviation.com/data/FARS/part_135-243.html For some reason not known to me, flight schools seldom voluntarily provide this information to their students. With less than 200 hours, you have a fair distance to go.


    Most Alaska operators require a minimum of 1000 hours or more. There are a few who will hire at less than that, but none for PIC positions without at least the legal minimum of 500 hours. Most operators also like to see some Alaska time or equivalent and some time in type. This is probably an insurance requirement for some operators. There are occasional co-pilot jobs that come up which require only the commercial, instrument and multi-engine certifications. Penair is one of those companies, but only very occasionally do they have to settle for a new SIC (second-in-command) with less than 500 hours TT. They require a two year employment contract and barely pay a living wage for this position. Alaska float plane operators want to see at least 200 hours on floats before hiring, at least a thousand hours TT, some Alaska time and some time in type.

    One way around the 200 hours on floats is to hire on with a company that flies both wheels and floats. With a fresh float rating, you wouldn't qualify for float flying, but fly wheels for such a company for several months. Prove yourself to be almost indispensable with your amazing work ethic, your excellent judgment, your scintillating personality, and your inordinate piloting skills and they might just phase you into float flying on an insurance waiver.

    Probably the best way to get a job flying in Alaska if you don't have at least a thousand hours or more is to move there and give flight instruction until you acquire the hours necessary. Anchorage would be a good starting point. Take Flight Alaska www.takeflightalaska.com at Merrill Field in Anchorage often hires flight instructors as there is a fairly steady turnover as pilot/flight instructors move on to air taxi jobs. AeroTech http://www.aerotechalaska.com/index_no_flash.html also at Merrill field in Anchorage seems to be always on the lookout for flight instructors . The Aero Club http://www.elmendorfaeroclub.com/ at Elmendorf Airforce base also provides civilian flight instruction. Artics Air Academy http://www.articsairacademy.com/ in Palmer is another.

    Anchorage would be a good starting point because it has the largest aviation community in Alaska. Living and working there for a year or more would provide you with the opportunity to meet many people in the aviation community who might be in a position to eventually help you in your quest. But in the mean time go after your CFI-I and start giving flight instruction to build time.

    The only other option for time building would be to buy your own airplane and build time that way, but I don't recommend that as the best way to improve your, knowledge, skills or judgment. Giving flight instruction will.

    One other option is to find a job working for an outfit operating under FARs Part 91. In Alaska, they are few and far between, because they are limited to a maximum distance of 25 miles from the airport of origin. Many Alaskan fly-out lodges operate under FARs Part 91, and are exempt from the 25 mile rule (only in Alaska), but they generally hire grizzled old bush pilots like me who have thousands of hours on floats in DeHavilland Beavers.

    Hauling parachute jumpers is usually a Part 91 operation. Towing banners is another, but requires tail dragger experience. There may be some tour operations, but not in Alaska, that operate under Part 91.


    So in my opinion, the best way to acquire flight time is to give flight instruction. You get paid to do it. You'll learn a whole lot more than you already know and you build flight time without tapping out your bank account. Take a look at www.flyalaska.com for some additional info.

    One other option would be to take a summer job in Alaska as a ramp rat for a wheels-only company or dock hand for a float plane outfit. This would give you a feel for the business and you might get a chance to ride along on a few flights where help was needed for unloading or loading, for repairing a remote company cabin etc.

    Best of luck to you,

    Jay

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    System says I have to spread it around befor giving you more rep but that was a great post!!

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    I got 'em for you ... that was a great informative post.

    If you cant stand behind the troops in Iraq.. Feel free to stand in front of them.

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    Lujon i got ya with the rep. Monguse great information.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Brewski View Post
    Hey Everyone,

    My name is Alex Golembiewski, I'm from Roseville, Michigan, about 15 minutes north of Detroit. I currently am a aviation student at Western Michigan University and will be graduating in April 2011 with a double-major in aviation flight science and administration. I have my single and multi-engine land commercial pilots license with an instrument rating. I have always loved the outdoors and am intrigued by everything Alaska has to offer. After graduation I am looking to move to Alaska and find work dealing with anything aviation, including the business side. I am willing to make nearly any reasonable sacrifice to make this goal a real opportunity! I have a personal website, www.sigeppilot.com with more information about myself, as well as my up-to-date resume. Thank you for taking the time to read this!

    Alex Golembiewski
    Sigeppilot@gmail.com
    Alex, sounds like Monguse laid it out for you perfectly. I envy your position and would be headed to Alaska asap, of course after you graduate. I was just in Kzoo a couple days ago and have a nephew who lives there. Good luck in Alaska

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    Default Grizzly 1

    Quote Originally Posted by Brewski View Post
    Hey Everyone,

    My name is Alex Golembiewski, I'm from Roseville, Michigan, about 15 minutes north of Detroit. I currently am a aviation student at Western Michigan University and will be graduating in April 2011 with a double-major in aviation flight science and administration. I have my single and multi-engine land commercial pilots license with an instrument rating. I have always loved the outdoors and am intrigued by everything Alaska has to offer. After graduation I am looking to move to Alaska and find work dealing with anything aviation, including the business side. I am willing to make nearly any reasonable sacrifice to make this goal a real opportunity! I have a personal website, www.sigeppilot.com with more information about myself, as well as my up-to-date resume. Thank you for taking the time to read this!

    Alex Golembiewski
    Sigeppilot@gmail.com
    Welcome, Alex. Great and informative post, by the way.

    Have you thought of contacting Alaska University at Anchorage (and maybe at Fairbanks as well)? Pretty solid aviation program, and I'll bet they could use a good staff member. Might be a place to start . . . . .

    Best of luck with it!

    Mort

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    Default Greatly appreciated guys!

    Everyone,

    Thanks for taking the time to reply back to me! Monguse, that information was EXACTLY what I was looking for! Good idea too Mort, didn't know Anchorage had an aviation program so that's a good start! Thanks again for giving me some direction and all the kind words!

    Alex

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    Alex,
    How is the WMU Aviation program doing? I graduated from Western in 2005 and the post 9-11 aviation industry problems had hit the program hard... are things improving or improved significantly? Did you have any issues? Good luck with the move up. Can't help you with a job, but PM me if you need a local to show you around town or the local airspace.

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    thanks for the post Alex. and thanks to Monguse and everybody else too!

    I was wondering the same thing.

    Matt.
    chippewabrandt@yahoo.com

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    Default More advice please

    Hello All,

    New to this forum...very informative post, but I wonder if you experienced guys out there could further elaborate, and share your candid thoughts with me.

    I'm a former airline pilot that is getting back to basics for fun. Well, fun, inasmuch as I don't wish to grind it out and just build time to make it to the airlines. Truly, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work and Alaska is very appealing to me as an outdoorsman.

    I'm pretty flexible in that I'd likely be willing to do a variety of flying jobs, but must admit, I'm partial to a Beaver on floats or something of the like.

    My challenge is that I'm not sure that operators in Alaska would give much consideration for the type of time I have. Do you think there would be any sort of an allowance or exception made to work with a guy with mostly 121 Jet PIC time? I have plenty of flight time, and was a CFII/MEI in the 90's. I left the airlines a few years ago to raise a small child, but just recently got current, got an IPC, and am reinstating my CFI next week so that I can sharpen up some.

    My question is this: what type of operation do you think I'd be best suited for? I have around 6000, most of which is PIC in turbo props and jets, with around a 1000 hours of dual given in small singles and twins. I'm degreed and have a perfect aviation record, but have no float time or taildragger time, although I'm eager to learn. It would obviously be easy to add my float and a taildragger endorsement, but I recognize that doing so doesn't make me experienced in that type of flying right off the bat.

    This time, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work for me, not be in such a big hurry, and appreciate your thoughts in advance.

    Kind Regards,

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    You are in good shape. There are several wheeled 206's to fly. I'd sure get a float rating and 10 hours and the same with tw. That way when an opportunity arises to fly that beaver on floats or a 185 you could do it.

    Probably best to look for a wheeled 206 job and then "work the angles" from there. Things happen quick around here if you are a good guy. You 'll be in the beaver before you know it if you aren't afraid to work. Sniff around hood and I'm sure you could come up with something. Nothing you could pay the bills with though.

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    rocco and Brewski;
    The previous posts are great information, but I would add to it some. For rocco there are plenty of turbine jobs around while you get some small plane experience. For both of you I would say, if there is any way you can afford it buy a champ or t-crate ( or similar) and fly around AK as much as possible. An instructing job will get you plenty of time but no experience. You need to really get out there and see what Alaska really is on your own some. You can build hours this way and get some real proficiency with your feet on the pedals (that reads tail wheel time ) Stop by here and I can get you a TW endorsementand some off field experience. Remember, as you already know, it takes alot more than ink in the log book to make you a good pilot.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by saltwatertom; 12-31-2010 at 11:28. Reason: wrong name

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    Hi,
    My wife works for guardian flight here in Fairbanks. She said they are looking for jet pilots, She said the best way to get in touch with them is www.guardianflight.com
    Jeff

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    Quote Originally Posted by roccodawg View Post
    Hello All,

    New to this forum...very informative post, but I wonder if you experienced guys out there could further elaborate, and share your candid thoughts with me.

    I'm a former airline pilot that is getting back to basics for fun. Well, fun, inasmuch as I don't wish to grind it out and just build time to make it to the airlines. Truly, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work and Alaska is very appealing to me as an outdoorsman.

    I'm pretty flexible in that I'd likely be willing to do a variety of flying jobs, but must admit, I'm partial to a Beaver on floats or something of the like.

    My challenge is that I'm not sure that operators in Alaska would give much consideration for the type of time I have. Do you think there would be any sort of an allowance or exception made to work with a guy with mostly 121 Jet PIC time? I have plenty of flight time, and was a CFII/MEI in the 90's. I left the airlines a few years ago to raise a small child, but just recently got current, got an IPC, and am reinstating my CFI next week so that I can sharpen up some.

    My question is this: what type of operation do you think I'd be best suited for? I have around 6000, most of which is PIC in turbo props and jets, with around a 1000 hours of dual given in small singles and twins. I'm degreed and have a perfect aviation record, but have no float time or taildragger time, although I'm eager to learn. It would obviously be easy to add my float and a taildragger endorsement, but I recognize that doing so doesn't make me experienced in that type of flying right off the bat.

    This time, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work for me, not be in such a big hurry, and appreciate your thoughts in advance.

    Kind Regards,
    Welcome, roccodawg,

    Just one question from me: are you able to grit your teeth on short final and bring the power all the way back? I've noticed that many of the Big Iron folks find it hard to just shut 'er down for the landing . . . . . It'll be necessary for short landings!

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    Brewski, you might consider inquiring with both the Elmendorf and Eielson units of the Alaska Air National Guard. The Elmo wing is expanding, and the Eielson wing has a small population base from which to recruit, so they both actively search for applicants and then skim the cream. Both hold an annual selection boards. Granted, selection would entail about 1 1/2 years of training, but it's a great experience with good pay. I just saw a newly be-winged LT gassing up his pretty little Cub on skis last week. He was lovin life and flying his buns off in both the big iron and his Cub, and he did a some flying for an outfitter last fall too. NO! I am not a recruiter, but I am a former military pilot, mostly big jets, some turbo-prop, some fighter-type, flying PA31 and C207 part 135 in northern half of AK. Good luck, and keep the shiny side up, greasy side down!

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    Quote Originally Posted by roccodawg View Post
    Hello All,

    New to this forum...very informative post, but I wonder if you experienced guys out there could further elaborate, and share your candid thoughts with me.

    I'm a former airline pilot that is getting back to basics for fun. Well, fun, inasmuch as I don't wish to grind it out and just build time to make it to the airlines. Truly, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work and Alaska is very appealing to me as an outdoorsman.

    I'm pretty flexible in that I'd likely be willing to do a variety of flying jobs, but must admit, I'm partial to a Beaver on floats or something of the like.

    My challenge is that I'm not sure that operators in Alaska would give much consideration for the type of time I have. Do you think there would be any sort of an allowance or exception made to work with a guy with mostly 121 Jet PIC time? I have plenty of flight time, and was a CFII/MEI in the 90's. I left the airlines a few years ago to raise a small child, but just recently got current, got an IPC, and am reinstating my CFI next week so that I can sharpen up some.

    My question is this: what type of operation do you think I'd be best suited for? I have around 6000, most of which is PIC in turbo props and jets, with around a 1000 hours of dual given in small singles and twins. I'm degreed and have a perfect aviation record, but have no float time or taildragger time, although I'm eager to learn. It would obviously be easy to add my float and a taildragger endorsement, but I recognize that doing so doesn't make me experienced in that type of flying right off the bat.

    This time, I'd like to do some enjoyable flying work for me, not be in such a big hurry, and appreciate your thoughts in advance.

    Kind Regards,
    I am in the same boat. I am trying to get into the seasonal operations down in KTN or JNU. Over the last three weeks I have sent at least 10 operators my stuff a variety of ways. No one took the bait. As the hiring window is now starting to close, I am going to give it my all and get my SES this week and fly up to JNU and KTN to bang on some doors. I think its the only way I'll get anyone to look at me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzly 1 View Post
    Welcome, roccodawg,

    Just one question from me: are you able to grit your teeth on short final and bring the power all the way back? I've noticed that many of the Big Iron folks find it hard to just shut 'er down for the landing . . . . . It'll be necessary for short landings!
    Not if you're slow flying, power on, nose up onto a short river bar unless you mean shutting 'er down at touchdown.

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