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Thread: Best Hunting Daypack? What do you Carry in it?

  1. #1

    Default Best Hunting Daypack? What do you Carry in it?

    What do you think is the best day pack? Barney's new one, Badlands, others? What size works best? And what do you carry in your pack?

  2. #2

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    Good thread. I'm looking for a better waterproof camo model, too (with NO reservoir!!).

    I don't alway carry the same amount of stuff, e.g., I lighten up if hunting familiar ground. If I'm putting in mileage, hunting by myself or transversing rough terrain, I'll fill it up. At most, I like to carry (not in order of importance): GPS, cell phone, small first aid kit (including ibuprofen wrapped in tissue so they don't rattle), dry socks, small note pad (with waterproof paper) and mechanical pencil, water bottle(s), trail mix and/or energy bars and jerky, hard candies, small ax or meat saw (maybe), space blanket, waterproof matches and firestarter of some sort and small handheld mirror (like in a lady's compact). In order that things aren't loose and banging around making a racket, I'll often put in a game bag or two (or an extra garment, if the day's weather looks sketchy, for example) to line the main compartment and sort of wrap up things.

  3. #3
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Badlands

    For me it has been a badlands 2200. Holds everything I need , raingear extra jacket, emergency tools food and water, plus my spotting scope. The construction is great and I have used it for 7 years now withut a flaw. Feels good in too and I love being able to access it from both the front and back

  4. #4
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    Default

    I also have a badlands. its the roll top stealth model and love it.

    As to what I carry, it varies.

  5. #5
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    Default

    Badlands. Very good quality and with a life time warranty.
    I always carry toilet paper, survival kit, small brush saw, compact rifle cleaning kit, small first aid kit, insect repellent, etc.
    Sometimes more stuff, sometimes less.

    http://www.badlandspacks.com/

    Kifura makes a pack second to none also. They are equal if not not better than the Badlands.
    http://kifaru.net/HUNTHOME.HTM
    Tennessee

  6. #6
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Default

    Mine is new and haven't had a chance to take it out hunting yet, but for fit and comfort to me, the Badlands 2200 is my daypack of choice.

  7. #7

    Default Day Packs

    If I am on familiar ground I carry a Crooked Horn Outfitters day pack with the usual water, snack, space blanket, fire starter, first aid kit, whistle, line, flash light, spare compass, knife, ammo, etc. I also have a "Just One" JP5 pack from Eblerstock and all the accessories that I use for the long haul. It works very well as a day pack, although it is heavier I can bring a load of meat back with it. I have used the Badlands 2200 and 2800. All of the packs I listed are very well made and it just depends on how much you want to stuff in a "day pack". The "Just One" JP5 is my favorite pack and probably is not a "day pack" when compared to the others.

  8. #8
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    I've been disappointed with my Crooked Horn. None of the straps stays adjusted. I may as well just hold the ends of the shoulder straps or it'll sag. Too bad, too, because other than that it's well built and tough.

  9. #9
    Member Matt's Avatar
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    Now, for what I carry in my pack? Usually have a few spare cartridges, two knives, two small headlamps and small flashlight, 3 or 4 game bags, water, some snacks, digital camera, latex gloves and regular gloves, small predator call, spare batteries (for camera and headlamps). Maybe my Leupold 15-45x spotting scope and little tripod. 50' small od green nylon rope. cell phone. Matches, lighter. Can of snuff.

  10. #10
    Member Montana Native's Avatar
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    Default

    I personally like Kelty's Elkhorn Fanny pack. Here's a blurp I wrote for my business... (not promoting the product, just my write-up)
    While preparation of your next outing
    should always be at the forefront of your
    thoughts, how many of you think about
    packing your basic necessities in? There
    have been so many occasions where I wish I
    could carry more, but due to the weight
    factor you find yourself skimping in order to
    save weight. Kelty has been around the
    backpacking industry for years. Recently
    they have expanded their line up to include
    some impressive products designed with the
    hunter/outdoorsman in mind. We’re testing
    their Elkhorn fanny pack. This simple nononsense
    fanny really fits the bill and has
    features well worth noting. For starters, the
    fabric utilized has low nap, is water resistant
    and comes in Mossy Oak ® Break Up
    camouflage. Many of the features are typical
    of Kelty and their product line-up.
    The pack has easily adjustable shoulder
    straps which are contoured to fit without
    being cumbersome to the user. Quite often,
    shoulder straps from other packs have
    tendencies to rub on your neck-line. The
    Elkhorn’s key selling point, however,
    should be their unique binocular clips built
    right into the shoulder straps. Not only was
    this the key feature, it eliminates the need to
    purchase a similar product. The features
    don’t stop there either; it also boasts a
    removable padded waist belt with built-in
    stabilizers and a sternum strap. All of these
    above mentioned items utilize moisture
    wicking fabrics to keep your perspiration to
    a minimum. It has a well thought out,
    zippered waist belt pocket, and access is
    easy via its large top panel. Keeping almost
    everything is imperative, but having a place
    to store your hydration device (water bottle)
    is critical. Its mesh water bottle pocket holds
    enough water for a typical daily outing.
    Sporting a large front pocket with
    organizational dividers, this pack is
    designed to keep your accessories (game
    calls, knives, etc.) all within easy reach. The
    outer mesh stash pocket holds items
    securely. It easily accommodates most GPS
    or handheld radios and keeps them readily
    accessible and secure at all times. When the
    pack is not in use, it doubles as binocular
    case with a fleece-lined optics pocket; we
    really liked this feature. It houses a handy
    carrying handle with an adjustable buckle.
    Lastly, for the items you cannot fit inside,
    compression lash straps are built right into
    the bottom. To finish this segment, we wish
    to address one last feature, a self-stowing
    pull-out blaze orange rain cover. All in all,
    Kelty has hit home for hunters and
    outdoorsman alike with the Elkhorn fanny
    pack.

    I still use the pack, although smaller than the Badlands, still viable & useful...
    Respect what you do not own but are privleged to enjoy, Mother Earth thanks you...

  11. #11
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    Default

    Maybe I'm dreaming, but if anyone has a used Badlands 2200 they want to part with I'm in the market. PM or email me.
    Vance in AK.

    Matthew 6:33
    "But seek first the kingdom of God and His righteousness, and all these things shall be added to you."

  12. #12

    Default

    My first time to make a comment on the forum. Usually content to stay quiet and read the good stuff from you guys. I've hunted Alaska for 36 years and have never gotten into these day packs. Almost everywhere I go, I carry a full-size pack. Started out with the old Trapper Nelson, wood frame and canvas bag. Then got an aluminum frame Kelty that I carried for 20 plus years. Now I've got some high-powered freighter frame job I got from Barney's a few years back. I like the full size. I've carried the things hundreds of miles in about every mountain range up here and feel naked without it. I can sit on it to stay off the wet ground or I can sit down with it on my back (waist belt loose) and lean back on the rocks with it. I've used it as a rifle rest to shoot critters, sometimes standing in front of me like a bipod. It can offer a little windbreak when you're laying on a mountain side for hours waiting for a sheep move into the open. My preferred method of carrying my rifle is to throw the strap over the top post on the pack and put my arm through. Had a hook mounted on my Kelty for that purpose. (I quit using the Kelty after it got away from me on a mountain side when it was full of goat meat. It never was quite the same after that.) When I knock down a critter and have the full-size pack on my back, I'm ready to pack meat. You guys can carry your day packs but I'm too old to change my habits now. Thanks for listening.

  13. #13

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    badlands 2800, I actually feel better wearing the pack than not wearing it. it seems to give me back support.....I must be wierd. I like the layout, I can pack light or heavy and if I spank something I can haul it out on the shelf. it has been quite waterproof and I have deffinetly overloaded it a time or two and it took it like a champ.

    kinda big for a daypack, but I like the feel and versatility.

  14. #14
    Moderator AKmud's Avatar
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    Default Cabela

    I just got this Cabela's "Hybrid" last year and love it so far. The upper pack can be removed or rolled up so you have only a large fanny pack. It is made with some super soft and quiet material and the zippers seem to be top quality. The straps are nice and wide and the belt is very wide and re-inforced for rigidity. It has an integrated Camel-bak hydration system which I'm not sure if I like yet, and the compartments have several different slash pockets and elastic straps to secure things inside the bag. There are "buddy-lock" fastening points for the "buddy-lock" accessories too.

    As far as what I carry.... That varies considerably day to day and trip to trip. I try to keep it to a minimum so I will have room to carry raingear and the clothing that I will be shedding as the temps get warmer throughout the day.
    AKmud
    http://i78.photobucket.com/albums/j96/AKmud/213700RMK1-1.jpg


    The porcupine is a peacful animal yet God still thought it necessary to give him quills....

  15. #15
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    Wink

    I use a Gregory Shasta internal frame pack, the lid detaches to a waist pack.Thats what i'll use out of a base camp. In it goes a silva landmark compass, very small, and has a sighting/signal mirror mounted in the cover,an emergency poncho, the size of a pack of cards from walmart. Waterpruff matches, a small birthday candle, cotton balls soaked in vasoline, first aid kit with needed Meds, neoprene bandaids, the best for blisters, a map of the area, trimmed down in a plastic lunch bag. A few extra rounds of ammo for rifle, or handgun held together with a small rubber band, so as not to rattle. Steiner preditor bino's 8 x 30's. A small poland spring water bottle, lots of water where I hunt. A micro Black Diamond headlamp. 30 ft of para cord. 10 ft of pink, or orange flagging tape. A small gerber folding knife . All the small / loose stuff goes in a small nylon stuff bag so all I have to do is transfer the small bag into the lid and I'm good to go. . A small seat pad made from a closed cell foam sleeping pad, sized to fit into the lid cover , it weighs almost nothing and is much better than sitting on wet rocks, and logs. Arround my neck is a home made survival necklace that includes a photon light, a gerber micro lst knife, a whistle, a windpruff lighter. Bill.
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Default My Choice

    Planning my 15th Alaska hunt for this fall. I use a rather unconventional approach to this question, based on my prior trips. I use a BullPac Alaska Model meat hauling frame, or use the standard with the shelf (I have both) and several roll-top dry bags in Mossy Oak camo pattern. One contains all of my butchering gear (knives, sharpening sticks, meat bags, rope, etc), one contains all of my rain gear, safety kit, sat phone, GPS, etc) and one contains misc hunting gear (ammo, range finder, binocs, spotting scope, etc). The roll-top dry bags are the small or medium size, made by Mad Dog, or Cabela's. Get the one's that are thicker. Nothing gets wet, the gear is stowed independently and you can pack them sideways so you can open the roll-top and get stuff out without untying them from the frame. When you kill a caribou or moose, you can start packing out the meat in the first load. It has worked extremely well for me, and I have packed out moose, caribou, elk, whitetail deer, and mule deer with this system. I have affixed a way to carry my 300 win mag on top, to get a rest from lugging it around all of the time. I have a detailed equipment list if you are interested. Hope that helps, CaribouHunter

  17. #17
    Member GrassLakeRon's Avatar
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    Default Cabelas German Surplus Pack

    I use a Cabelas German Mil. Surp. Day Pack. These pack are new unissued and are $20. Waterproof and built well. 1700 cubic inches of space. Depending where I hunt, 1) my cabelas dry plus coat and pants. 2) dry pair of socks 3) gloves (if i don't have them on) 3) Survival kit in plastic waterproof box (meds/fire starting/etc) 4) 2 FEMA Blue traps w/para cord 5) food and in the out side pouches 1)Water and 2) camp stove. I carry my GPS, cell phone, extra ammo, lights, matches, and pocket knife in my filson double mac jacket.

    Ron

  18. #18
    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    Default

    I have used a Gregory, Badlands and a miriad of others but I have settled on the Kifaru packs. I use either the Pointman or Late Season (I know they are essentialy the same pack) and they work wonderfully. I have no problem carrying 1/2 of a caribou in one and can pack it all day. Wonderful suspension system! Put all my stuff in their exterior pouches and put them inside the pack. When I need to put meat in the pack take them out and put them on the outside. I especially like the zipper at the bottom, makes it really easy to remove meat from the pack. Jim

  19. #19

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    It seams like a lot of people out there are using the Badlands 2200 pack. I am actually considering purchasing this pack and had a couple of questions for those of you who own one. How does this pack work on extended hunts. I know the topic of this forum was daypack, but I am looking for something that might be able to do it all. Is packing an animal out a reasonable task for this pack, or would it make things pretty difficult? Any comments would be welcome. Also, has anyone used or know of anybody that has used this pack? http://cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/product/standar...=cat20770&hasJS=true

    Thanks

  20. #20
    Member BucknRut's Avatar
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    Thumbs up Let's see it!

    Quote Originally Posted by CaribouHunter View Post
    ... I have a detailed equipment list if you are interested. Hope that helps, CaribouHunter
    We are always interested in a detailed list! Please do send it our way.

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