Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Cabin foundation questions, please chime in w/ ideas as I'm ready to start.

  1. #1
    Member billy jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Wasilla AK
    Posts
    182

    Default Cabin foundation questions, please chime in w/ ideas as I'm ready to start.

    Looking to put in my cabin foundation at my lakefront property west of Kashwitna and the Big Su. I'd like it a few feet off the ground for storage and so the snow and vermin keep off. I'm thinking of sono tubes? I've never worked w/ them but seen em on some cabins. Looking at a 16X20 w/ loft. I'm either going to buy a kit from Friesen or just buy the lumber and do it myself. I'd like to at least get the tubes in place this fall and haul in my lumber and supplies w/ my sled this winter along the Deshka. If any one has good ideas for a foundation w/o a cement truck please let me know. Keep in mind I have access by float plane in summer and snowmobile in winter.

    Thanks Billy Jack

  2. #2

    Default

    I am building a 1600 sq ft place on trapper now and we used 45 hand dug holes with 6x6 presuure treated timbers wrapped with plastic. We hand dug about 3 feet and mixed 1 1/2 bags of concrete and poured that as the base let it set up over night then we placed the wrapped 6x6 in the hole added 2 mores bags of concrete each and back filled. I hauled all this in in the winter the concrete alone was 110 bags. I bought a mixer and hauled that in as well.The concrete altough heavy rides great in a tote sled i hauled it all in behind a 570 fan cooled bear cat no problems. pm me if you got more questions id be happy to help

  3. #3
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    952

    Default

    Any idea what kind of soil you have? It makes a big difference on what kind of "shortcuts" you might be able to get away with. It would be worthwhile to go out with post hole diggers and dig a few holes where you want the cabin to go and see what you have.

  4. #4

    Default

    we had lots of devils club and roots the first foot or so we took a modified ice chisel out that was super sharp and chopped right through them got down to a silty soil dug another 2 feet and hit SOME gravel. The more post you put in the better off you are and the bigger the "foot" the better you are as it spreads the weight i estimate about 50 to 60 thousand lbs on the posts. I am a builder and i have done many remote cabins and this works. If you are tryimg to build on a swamp you need to think surface area.

  5. #5
    Member cdubbin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    KP, the dingleberry of Alaska
    Posts
    1,751

    Default

    6x6 treated posts are all you need for a frame cabin; keep the dead load light and a 12-12 pitch metal roof to shed the snow load. For a 16x20 you'll need 9 posts, if you make up some nice big girts. Wrapping them in plastic isn't necessary. Neither is backfilling with concrete; a good gravel base and gravel backfill will do the trick. Make the holes as deep as you can with your post hole digger. Lowe's has posts for $20 apiece.
    " Gas boats are bad enough, autos are an invention of the devil, and airplanes are worse." ~Allen Hasselborg

  6. #6
    Member Dirtofak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Beaver Creek
    Posts
    2,267

    Default

    Just a quick note - I have a metal 12/12 roof. I believed that it would shed snow immediately. It didn't. I had 1-1/2 foot+ of snow that stuck. Be sure to factor in for the times when the snow sticks! Be sure not to have the snow slide off on a doorway. A little extra eve makes it slide farther away too. You don't want the snow up against the wall. When you are ready to buy metal for the roof, PM me for a name and phone number for a quote. He is great to work with, has a top of the line product and very reasonable pricing.

    Mike

  7. #7

    Default

    Make sure the posts are .60 treated.Some of the box store stuffis not.

  8. #8

    Default

    I think the issue here is the frost jacking up the posts in the spring. Hence the plastic.frost cant grab it where as wood it can my thoughts.

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    22

    Default

    I've seen the visqueen frost jacked to the surface. Once that happens, the posts could move.

  10. #10
    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Anchorage, Alaska, United States
    Posts
    3,256

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by akdube View Post
    I think the issue here is the frost jacking up the posts in the spring. Hence the plastic.frost cant grab it where as wood it can my thoughts.
    Not highly suggested in my book. Moisture will get inside the plastic (no matter what wood is used) and it will rot. Every pressure treated will rot over time. Better to leave it off and let the leach back into the ground than trap in around and hold it on your posts.
    Grandkids, Making big tough guys hearts melt at first sight

  11. #11
    Member Vince's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Fairbanks most the time, Ancorage some of the time,& on the road Kicking Anti's all the time
    Posts
    8,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alaskachuck View Post
    Not highly suggested in my book. Moisture will get inside the plastic (no matter what wood is used) and it will rot. Every pressure treated will rot over time. Better to leave it off and let the leach back into the ground than trap in around and hold it on your posts.
    EXACTLY...

    there is only two ways to build on ground with perma frost in it... ( well.... unless your rolling in dough and can afford engineered products with cooling transfers)

    1 remove it, ALL OF IT.. down to gravle and back fill to above with compacted gravel and foundation

    2 insulate the ground and build gravle pad with pads and peirs for cabins, ( this is the economical and prefered method in the faribanks area for many cabins)

    post holes in perma frost ground will settle and heave and or sink over time.. it can be slowed by having, un heated space under the cabin with constant air flow to prevent cabin heat escapement from thawing the ground. however ALL materials inserted into the ground will transfer heat into the ground and allow perma frost to retreat over time.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  12. #12

    Default

    Chance Helical Piers. All you need to know and use.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
    ~~Abraham Lincoln~~

  13. #13
    New member
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    anchorage ak.
    Posts
    3

    Default

    I used railroad ties back in 1998. It went through the flood on Bigsue and several earthquakes and has not jacked or heaved. It is five ft. off the ground and the post are at best 4 ft. in the ground. I used 15 ties for a two story 16x24 cabin. It worked like a charm. My soil is sandy though.

  14. #14
    Member billy jack's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Wasilla AK
    Posts
    182

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rhino View Post
    I used railroad ties back in 1998. It went through the flood on Bigsue and several earthquakes and has not jacked or heaved. It is five ft. off the ground and the post are at best 4 ft. in the ground. I used 15 ties for a two story 16x24 cabin. It worked like a charm. My soil is sandy though.
    Rhino, did you use 3 rows of five? 3 front and 5 deep? Concreted in?
    thanks

  15. #15
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Talkeetna
    Posts
    5,714

    Default

    It really depends on your ground type and pads you put under the posts. A 16x24 would only need 8 6x6 posts if you put them on 2x2 concrete pads under them. If it's super tight gravel you might get away without the concrete. If you used 3 rows of 4 you'd be more than solid on good gravel. If I were building a remote place that had good gravel and no permafrost I wouldn't have an issue at all using that pattern. 8' apart means you can use 24' 4x12's across the tops of your posts and 2x8's for your floor joists.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  16. #16
    Member Rock_skipper's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Deltajct
    Posts
    2,499

    Default

    We just used to use a really greased up pipe in the villages, and that was all permafrost.

    That being said we were puting down 20' sections of 8 " and filling the outsides with slurry. We tried alot of things out there as to what the engineers told us to try. Did they work? I hav'nt heard that they did'nt. In Platium we did a post and pad metheod, 3x3 pad with a 6x6 up right, we did the piling with the plastic in a few villages.

    There is on top of the ground system that is the newest and greatest from what I've heard, I think that the proto type was used in Nome.

    Not sure about that, been out of the loop for awhile. Maybe some one else on here can give more insight on it.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •