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Thread: Anyone else using a plastic sled for the haul rd?

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    Member billy jack's Avatar
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    Default Anyone else using a plastic sled for the haul rd?

    After hiking the 5 miles in and shooting my first bull caribou w/ a rifle last year and having to pack it out in 2 trips by myself, I vowed to never endure that kind of torture again. I considered buying a plastic hauling sled while in Fairbanks on the way up but declined. I'm going back up there in a few weeks and will try to use my Jetsled XL. I think that I'll hike in, put up a bivy and shoot one that afternoon or following morning then butcher it up and pull it back to camp over the course of a day. I heard that Sportsman's warehouse is out of em cause everyone else has the same idea. Anyone have luck w/ pulling one of these freight sleds on the tundra without snow?

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    I used a freighter sled a couple of years ago on tundra with very little snow. It sucked! The friction between the plastic sled and the tundra negated any benefit of not having to carry the weight on my back. I think a sled will only be a benefit if the ground is completely snow covered and the sled will easily slide along.

    I plan all of my rifle hunts on the Haul Road with two days to pack out a 'bou at the end. If I don't shoot a 'bou I go home two days early.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    It's Definitely not as easy dragging sleds on dry tundra, (not as easy as snow anyway),but I think it may be a lot better than packing on your back and more capacity to get it done in one trip.

    I use one to haul firewood a lot in winter but the snow gets pretty thin in Kodiak forest and I know by experience, it is possible to use on dry ground and get a LOT of weight moving. A little better when raining. Probably factor in the terrain also, if it's just flat tundra, worth considering, I've been thinking about trying to get away with that on the Kodiak Reindeer deal if I get way back inland but thinking if I get into Alders or a lot of elevation changes I may get my butt kicked with the sled idea.

    I guess you gotta figure you can go a lot slower if youre already hauling both loads, right?
    K9 does sound like he's been there tho, probably better listen to that, maybe you can get out and try one, my sled is really strongly built but super light weight, might make a difference.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member Casper50's Avatar
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    I use one to haul my bear bait equipment in and out of the Kenai refuge. About half of the time on a gravel road. The small gravel grabs alot. It the woods it's okay. I've had to haul it through small tundra like areas. It catches on every hump. I've bought a roll up plastic sled made for deer hauling and am going to try it out on Kodiak if I get my bear this fall and take it with me for my moose hunt. If you put small enough chunks on it it will roll up into a 16 to 18 inch roll with a curved front. Easier to take between the trees but the rolling motion might be a pain.

    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...080&hasJS=true

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Well, I haven't done it on dry tundra and would not recommend it. I used a sled in about 4-5 inches of snow and it was still brutal. We did make it out in one trip in one day, but it was even tougher and more exhausting than any sheep hunt I've been on. As K9 said, the friction is still there, and any time you come to one of those God-forsaken tussocks (which is ALWAYS), you have to pull the sled up and over. No matter how you do it, the pack out is not going to be "fun" but I think pulling a sled over dry tundra is a good way to have a heart attack...

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Casper let us know how that works, heck that'd be worth a thread of it's own to hear results of that sled on Kodiak or in Moose country, I can't post a pic of mine but it is a standard highsided sled, Wmart special but it works really well for staying upright. Haven't used yet for hauling game meat.

    For several years, I used one of those orange kids snowsleds when walking out of Talkeetna (about 7 miles upriver) to build and live in the woods. worked really well for lowslung loads, used all on snowcovered ground but I Absolutely Loved not having my back get soaked with sweat when walking in winter. I used that sled to haul tons of gear over three full winters of living out there.

    This new one, I'll get pics if I get it to work this fall might be the ticket.

    Tundra is always wet in the morning right? pack up your sled, lay down for a short nap, then in mid of night or early morning get going on the dew covered Tundra? Might just be SLICK

    No doubt tho, if the Tundra is wind swept dry, it ain't gonna be easy.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    I have never hauled any animal with a sled but have hauled people on them and can highly recommend Sekdco's products for durability and their ability to slide on rough surfaces. They tend to slide a lot easier than a standard plastic sled with on gravel, dirt, or asphalt not to mention the woods. I have not used one on tundra though. I will say you can not destroy one. I have seen them drug for over a mile on asphalt with a heavy person in one behind a 4 wheeler and it was still in usable condition.

    Having said that I have never had to pull one by myself so don't know how well that will work. You also have the issue that they do not steer on their own so the tussucks will be a pain just like trees are when going through the woods.

    Think I will stick with a pack

    http://www.skedco.com/

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    I am taking the roll up type on a moose hunt this fall and may or may not need it. Never tried it before so new to me also. After reading these posts I am wondering if there might be a spray coating of some type that we could "slick up" the sleds with for dryer ground applications????
    When asked what state I live in I say "The State of Confusion", better known as IL....

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    I had to drag out a moose for a mile, and use a kidís sled. It was mix blessing, going down a steep hill it was really hard to keep under control. The grass next to the river was acting like a brake, and the area was covered in brush and the sled keeps hanging up, if it was not for game trails going to the river it would have been useless. I ended up making a 2 wheel cart, it would have worked a lot better. Another thing you need to consider is the amount of weight you are hauling, you may find splitting the load and making two trips makes more sense.

    Unless the ground is soft mud or snow I would use wheels.

  10. #10

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    I have dragged sleds of every kind over dirt, swamps, snow, ice, tundra and rocks. Very doable. Don't try to load it up heavy. Adjust your load to meet the conditions and what feels right. Might have to make a couple of trips, but still better than multiple trips with it on your back. I have also built a balanced cart, with handles front and back. I used lightwieght electrical conduit tubing and two turf tires off of a riding mower. It has saved my bacon numerous times. Another trick I have used, is to carry two five gallon buckets, one in each hand and when you get tired, you simply set the buckets down and sit on one of them.
    "96% of all Internet Quotes are suspect and the remaining 4% are fiction."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Akres View Post
    I have also built a balanced cart, with handles front and back. I used lightwieght electrical conduit tubing and two turf tires off of a riding mower. .


    You just describe the cart I made, except I use 26” tires; you’re a very smart guy. J

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Either of you guys have a picture of those carts you're describing?
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Member Kay9Cop's Avatar
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    Two years before I used the sled, which coincidentally I used to haul out the caribou in my avatar, my friend and I tried a double-handled cart with oversized tires. The tussocks threw it every which way and dumped it on its side uncountable times.

    For the Haul Road I would not recommend a sled unless there's snow and I would not recommend a cart except for the couple of gravel roads you can walk along. For dry tundra you really have to pack. I've done the 5 mile hike four times and the two easiest ones were the two I trained for the long walk with a pack.
    "Beware the man with only one gun; he may know how to use it."

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    Member tiger15's Avatar
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    I used the one Kay9Cop described on the Haul Rd last year in mid-October with a considerable amount of snow on the ground and it worked very well with two kids pulling it. We had 550 cord attached to the sled to act as shoulder straps for the both of us and we pulled it out with ease. The only aggravating part was when we busted through the snow as we walked. I used a similar sled to haul in bear bait items this past season and I will never do that again. It got caught on every uneven service and twisted and rolled every 15-20 seconds...what a pain! Looking at Kay9Cop's avatar, I would highly advise against dragging a sled even on that flat terrain, packing it out might prove to be more productive and less of a pain in the rear.

  15. #15

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    I use a Caldwell Dead Sled that you can get at Cabela's. I've drug out a couple of caribou with it now, both on snow and on dry ground. It worked excellent and I keep it with me even when bowhunting along the road. Both times I hauled out the full animals (quartered and in bags).

    It packs up small and comes with straps for tying the load down and hauling. I put a big rip in it over a root, but I think that spot would have torn a hole in pretty much any sled the way I yanked on it when it got stuck.

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    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    Instead of drag ropes try fabbing tow bars out of 3/4" conduit. Hammer the ends flat, drill out and pin them to the sled. Then pin the other ends to the bottom of your pack frame. Put 50lbs on your back and the rest in the sled and go. Make sure the load in the sled is lashed securely. A shifting load makes for an unpleasant and tiring drag.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

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    Ive drug bou out on dry ground with a "walmart sled" Not too fun. It was a lot of work. I would take them along on every trip though as you never know if it will snow. Up there it can snow whenever. We took them one year and they got left in the truck. That night it snowed an inch and we had 2 bou to drag out the next morning and we didnt have the sleds. We hauled camp out the first trip then went back in with sleds but by then the snow had mostly melted. Had we taken the sleds in to begin with we probably could have hauled it all out in one trip-on the snow. If you drag them in and can use them great... if you cant use them to drag meat then you drag them back out empty. They dont wiegh that much. If you even put 25 lbs in them then its 25 lbs you dont have to carry on your back. Id go prepared.

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    Default Dragging moose on a sled

    Quote Originally Posted by sambuck12 View Post
    Ive drug bou out on dry ground with a "walmart sled" Not too fun. It was a lot of work. I would take them along on every trip though as you never know if it will snow. Up there it can snow whenever. We took them one year and they got left in the truck. That night it snowed an inch and we had 2 bou to drag out the next morning and we didnt have the sleds. We hauled camp out the first trip then went back in with sleds but by then the snow had mostly melted. Had we taken the sleds in to begin with we probably could have hauled it all out in one trip-on the snow. If you drag them in and can use them great... if you cant use them to drag meat then you drag them back out empty. They dont wiegh that much. If you even put 25 lbs in them then its 25 lbs you dont have to carry on your back. Id go prepared.
    PLASTIC SLED .................
    My son and I got a moose about a 5 minute "drag" off the river. It was 8:15 in the evening. The brush was pretty thick
    but it wasn't too hard getting around the occasional alder. We skinned and quartered the moose (2.5 yr old) and used a beat up
    cheap plastic kid's sled to haul the meat to the boat. I had replaced the small diameter line on the sled with some 5/8" rope so
    the line wouldn't cut through the sled and the larger line would be easier on the hands when pulling. It worked really slick. I am almost 70 and we could have packed the moose out but bagging the meat in game bags and lifting them into sled was so much easier, quicker, and was a lot less of a hassle. The drag was pretty easy. We both pulled the hind quarters and one person did the front quarters. What really worked slick was the two ramps we brought. We set them up from the bow of the boat to the river bank and just pulled the sled with the quarters from out of the brush and across the ramps into the boat and onto the tarp.
    I had brought a can of Crisco to grease the bottom of the sled but we didn't need it. I am thinking that a sled made from the UHMW material might be a better overall option (stronger and wider) for a larger moose. I don't think the sled would have handled a larger moose for strength or width. I could make one by shipping out the material or maybe someone is making them for sale (?)
    If so please post. We got the moose into the boat, all clean at 0500. We did stop to eat before we started to skin and quarter.

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    Plastic sleds work great on snow, and mud as i have used them for years...I have a orange kid sled just for pulling in
    Bear bait. and when there is snow on the ground, even soft spring snow it works great. But once the snow is gone it's only advantage to me is that i'm not getting great smelly bait on me. I have a large roll up sled made for pulling out game and i once slid a bear out with it.through the woods, alders, and grass..took two of us and it was work.lots of work. I believe dressing that bear out and carring loads out on my back would have been easier. I'll agree that at times they are great, but haven't found much advantage without snow. I have packed those haul road bou out and i dress them out and pack em...

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    I religiously use one for moose, and my old beater blue sled has probably been in on at least 5 45" or greater moose. I bolstered the ropes as suggested but I also put a piece of plastic 3\4 conduit on the pull rope so you don't cut your hands, and it makes the two man pull easier if you make it about 16". I've done this for up to 3/4 mile with moose quarters and always on dry tundra. What I like about it is when you rest, you don't still have 90 plus pounds on your back. True mossy tundra is a pain, I aim for low shrubs like blueberries as they actually lessen the friction.....grass also slides slicker. I used to bring a can of pledge along to slick the bottom but it's usually scraped off after one trip.

    Personally, I don't like huge loads on my back. To me it's not only uncomfortable, but it also increases the risk that a simple trip or stumble could break or rip something. The sled idea is the tortoise for sure, but then again, I've never dragged one five miles so i don't know how much tortoising a man can take. I am usually about more trips, less weight. I can walk all day with 50 lbs on my back, I'll be dead by noon wiht 90.

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