Results 1 to 13 of 13

Thread: Grayling & Dolly Varden on the Parks Highway

  1. #1

    Default Grayling & Dolly Varden on the Parks Highway

    Going up to Denali in a couple of weeks (just before we go to the Kenai). I'd love to catch a Dolly and a Grayling, to add them to my life list. I'll have the kids with, and don't want to take a whole lot of time from the family to catch them.

    Anyone willing to share a couple of methods and places to try? Thanks!

  2. #2
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    dry flies for grayling up high in the drainages, dollies are kind scarce on the parks but you could try flesh flies near the mouths of the streams might be your best bet
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  3. #3

    Default

    I know it's not Pinks & Silvers, but someone has to have some tips for a spin fisherman...

  4. #4
    Member kenaibow fan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2010
    Location
    In a van down by the river
    Posts
    2,039

    Default

    talk to the jedimastersalmonslayer he is on my friends list, he has good info to help you out.

  5. #5

    Default Grayling & Dolly

    Little Vibrax, Mepps and Thomas bouyants going t work?

  6. #6

    Default

    A small rooster tail or panther martin wouldn't hurt either.

  7. #7

    Default

    Stop into a fly shop and buy a few nymphs in about size 12. tie them on your spinning line and hook up a bobber about 18 inches from the fly. That way you can cast easily and can tell if you are getting bites. Should be great on the grayling.

  8. #8

    Default Nymphs for Grayling

    Something like a Copper John, or similar?

    Am I better off using a fly rod (hadn't planned to pack one of those, since I'm bringing 3 kids along).

  9. #9
    Member Gr is for Greg's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Anchorville
    Posts
    597

    Default

    I think you'll be much happier if you bring a fly rod. Grayling will almost always hit the surface, and there's really no way to fish a dry with spinning gear. You'll have more fun bringing them in too. I would strongly suggest making room for a 5-wt.

    -Gr
    My signature is awesome.

  10. #10

    Default

    OK, you talked me into it. I'll pack the little Diamondback. What kind of drys do I need. I've got various hoppers and ants.

  11. #11
    Member jakec5253's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    381

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big D RiverGuide View Post
    OK, you talked me into it. I'll pack the little Diamondback. What kind of drys do I need. I've got various hoppers and ants.
    Elk hair caddis is my go to fly for grayling, with a griffiths gnat in second place. Although some days, I think as long as it floats and looks somewhat bug like, they will eat it.
    All the romance of trout fishing exists in the mind of the angler and is in no way shared by the fish.

  12. #12
    Member ak_powder_monkey's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Eagle River/ Juneau
    Posts
    5,154

    Default

    Mayfly looking flies seem to have been working lately much better than anything else
    I choose to fly fish, not because its easy, but because its hard.

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Eagle River, AK
    Posts
    124

    Default

    Can't beat a Golden Ribbed Hare' Ear, either. This is a nymph that will catch grayling or trout, fished wet or dry, on most occasions.
    If I had to take only one fly with me for food to survive in the bush, it would be either a golden-ribbed hare's ear, or an elk wing caddis.

    And - you can catch grayling with a spin rod fished with a bobber as was mentioned earlier - it will work just as well with dry flies as with nymphs. We taught my daughter to fish this way when she was small, and she caught lots of fish in the lakes- grayling and rainbows -with just a spin-rod and a bobber. In the river it works even better, as the fish don't have a much time to examine things.

    Try Troublesome Creek and Byers Creek around mile 135. Troublesome downstream from the highway to the where it runs into the Chulitna, and Byers both up and down from the highway. Haven't fished either in 15 or 20 yrs , but they were pretty good back in the day...
    Bill

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •