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Thread: 14 ft sled

  1. #1
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    Default 14 ft sled

    Would like input from those using small jets 20-30 hp on jon boat type hulls.

    I have a 30 hp 2 stroke Tohatsu with jet pump and looking for hull.

    Looking at the Lowe 14' semi V riveted at 260# .072 and a Tracker Grizzly semi-V welded at 365# with .100 metal. I know the heavier gauge will be better for river work, but the extra weight will certainly degrade the performance, and I have some concerns with riveted construction. Any experience with these small hp boats would be appreciated. Would be using for fishing and hunting on class II with 2 aboard.

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    I've had two 14' jon boats, and still have one of them. I refer to it as a "coffin" boat. I'd strongly suggest you'll be happier with a 16 or 18' boat. Longer boats plane easier, ride flatter which is better in the shallows, and stay on plane slower, too.

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    Would you be referring to the narrow flat bottom jons, if so, I'd agree a coffin. But, then I'm used to Kayaks down river, real coffins.

    Both these hulls I'm looking at, are 6 ft. wide and a shallow semi V bottom, perfect for jet power according to Outboard Jet's boat selection guide. The Lowe hull is one recommended by Alaska Mining and Diving Supply in this horse power range. A 16' or 18' boat would bust the weight limit performance with a 30 hp. power head. Also if the boat has to be lined or portaged through shallows or bad spots with motor and gear removed, weight is the problem.

    Outboard Jet, the maker of all these pumps, does not recommend more then a 14' boat with this low a horse power. Their graph shows I should not be trying to push more then 950# total. If I take the 14 ft .100 boat at 360 # and the motor at 115 # that's 475# add 12 gals of gas with tank, 80# and two persons at 190# each = 935 leaving only 15# for gear..... That on paper is the problem, with the .100 hull, weight. The lighter .072 hull is 100# lighter. That makes 115# of gear fit into the weight restriction.

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    Error in above post, OBJ does not recommend "shorter" then a 14' hull, or narrower then 48" bottom. I see Lowe makes a 16' 48" bottom hull with weight listed at 275# only 15# more then the 14' ??? Beam on both is 70".

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    You live in the jet boat capitol of the world. Look at what people are using. There's a reason they use what they do.

    Be careful about Outboard Jet's recommendations. Dick told me personally to leave two shims worth of clearance between impeller and sleeve. That's horrible advice. Tighten the clearance to where the impeller jams and back it off one shim. Your load capacity and out-of-the-hole performence will be WAY better. Friends and I used to have half-thickness shims made to get our clearance right to the gnat's *****. I could have my unit shimmed so it'd work in a lake but jam in the Susitna silt. A half shim was perfect to adjust it.

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    No I live in the un-jet capitol of world, California. :-) But, hope to escape to Idaho soon. My trips to AK consist of jamming inflatables in to my Cessna.

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    180pilot,
    It sounds like you already know you're going to have to make some compromises with your 30 hp jet. I've run a 40 hp yamaha jet on a riveted jon boat and I have a welded semi v with 3/8" bottom and 1/4" sides I had made overbuilt due to the river I run a lot. Lots of rocks, fast current and shallow.
    The extra weight of the better built boat would be a concern to me with a low hp jet unit. You're only getting about 21 hp at the jet.
    I would be very careful following Mr. Pid's advice on adjust the impeller clearance. Shimming the tolerances too tight can cause a lot of wear on the liner and impeller. I use a .020" feeler gauge to set the clearance on my jets as advised by a shop here in Anchorage and it works great.

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    Angry

    Well soon as I get the answers, they will change the question. I'm apprehensive of buying anything right now as it appears my lovely light weight 2 stroke engine will shortly be outlawed on every fresh water river in the country. After researching the Kenai proposal, could someone please tell me how gasoline, which will vaporize at -40 will not vaporize, ("like it does in the lower 48"), in the Kenai, as the proposal states??????

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    The ONLY thing that I've seen that affects sleeve and impeller wear is pumping sand and gravel. With tight clearances the gravel won't lodge between the impeller leading edge and the sleeve. Not the case with Dick's suggested clearance. Been there. I got tired of buying sleeves. Sand won't end your day. Gravel sure can. Less clearance is better. If you happen to pump some sand and wear the liner, adjust the shims. That's precisely why they're there.

    I suppose none of it matters if you never run in shallow enough water to bump the bottom. Well, that's not true. As I said, the load capacity of your boat will go up with a well-adjusted impeller. So will top speed. Been there, too.

    That said, do whatever you want.

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