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Thread: What boots for goat/sheep?

  1. #1
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    Default What boots for goat/sheep?

    We drew the Bradley Lake goat hunt this year. We did a similar hunt two years ago and the old hiking boots were soaked the entire time. I hate having wet feet for days. I've got some Koflach Artcis Expedition plastic boots but the suckers are supposed to be good to -65°. I think my feet would be soaked in sweat instead of rain. Can anybody suggest a good mountain hunting boot and a place that sells them? I'd really like to go with some lighter weight/less heavily insulated plastic mountain boots but will welcome all suggestions.

    p.s., I know, I gotta get em broken in first. We aren't going until mid-September so a few good hiking trips between now & then oughta do it.

  2. #2
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Take a look at the gear forum. We seem to hash out the "best mountain hunting boot" question about once every other week.

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    I have to agree with LuJon. Check out the Outdoor Gear forum and do a search. Here is a great thread on the subject: http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...highlight=lowa

  4. #4
    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    As above: search archives
    "Actions speak louder than words - 'nough said"

  5. #5
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Okay, here's how it's done:

    Don't shop for boots that won't get wet, because they all will. Shop for boots that will get DRY once they are wet.

    I NEVER sheep or goat hunt in a waterproof boot.

    For the last 4 years, my "boot" was a Merrell Chameleon hiking shoe, mid-height. Non-waterproof.

    This year I'm going to give the Sawtooth model a try. They waterproofed the Chameleons in '09.

    The weight savings is worth the damp feet. Damp feet dry for 10-hours per night in my sleeping bag. The Merrells nearly dry out overnight in my tent, tipped up with the heal down. With a fresh pair of socks, they feel actually dry. I take a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for when and if the water is just too much.

    There. The secret is out.

    After just one drying afternoon you're back to square one with dry feet and dry shoes.

    I'll say the most important part again; the weight savings is worth the damp feet.

    Taylor

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    Okay, here's how it's done:

    Don't shop for boots that won't get wet, because they all will. Shop for boots that will get DRY once they are wet.

    I NEVER sheep or goat hunt in a waterproof boot.

    For the last 4 years, my "boot" was a Merrell Chameleon hiking shoe, mid-height. Non-waterproof.

    This year I'm going to give the Sawtooth model a try. They waterproofed the Chameleons in '09.

    The weight savings is worth the damp feet. Damp feet dry for 10-hours per night in my sleeping bag. The Merrells nearly dry out overnight in my tent, tipped up with the heal down. With a fresh pair of socks, they feel actually dry. I take a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for when and if the water is just too much.

    There. The secret is out.

    After just one drying afternoon you're back to square one with dry feet and dry shoes.

    I'll say the most important part again; the weight savings is worth the damp feet.

    Taylor
    Hmm, is this guy really crazy or is he really on to something?

  7. #7
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    Thanks a lot for ur sharing.
    I'm considering this so it's really helpful.


    Hire .NET Developer

  8. #8
    Member doogiehauz's Avatar
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    I love my cabelas meindal alaska hunters, tuff awesome ankle support and not overly expensive.

  9. #9
    Member huntalaska's Avatar
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    Cabelas MNT Hunters work great..

  10. #10
    Member huntalaska's Avatar
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    wybohunter,
    Yea he's nuts..
    Why get wet feet if you don't have to. Many a sheep hunts I do there is no need to get wet. The reason you buy good boots is not just because you don't want to get your feet wet. What about toe and ankle pertection. If you get your boots wet so what walk them dry.. Or wait your right we should all were Crocs on sheep hunts for now on.. There your transportation.. get the best you can.

  11. #11
    Premium Member MarineHawk's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by doogiehauz View Post
    I love my cabelas meindal alaska hunters, tuff awesome ankle support and not overly expensive.
    FWIW, I have the 800 gram insulated Meindls and really like them now: http://www.cabelas.com/p-0005470810912a.shtml

    I had to wear them for about 20 miles of hiking to properly break them in (about four or five four-mile hikes). They fit perfectly and comfortably now. I'm not saying they are better or worse than any other particular boot, but I like them better than any insulated boot I have owned or worn in the past.

  12. #12
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    I like Lowas because they fit me. I like Gore Tex because it works. My mid height Lowas are my favorite dog walking boots. I just had to replace them because they started to leak. It was time since the soles were getting thin. Conservatively estimating, those boots had about 2000 miles on them, both paved and unpaved. The only way I noticed them leaking was because I like to fish in them when I don't need waders. Standing up to may ankles in water has never been a problem until it was, and it's hard to complain after all those miles. I bought a duplicate pair without hesitation.

    The only time my Extremes have gotten wet was because the water crossing took longer than I had hoped and water came in over the tops. They dried in the tent that night.

  13. #13
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Talk about me, but don't hunt with me.

    While you're balancing pack and self on a rock looking for another rock to jump to, I'll be eating an energy bar on the other side and when you catch up, we'll move out again! Haah Then when we get to base camp, I'll have walked my feet dry and you'll be standing there wondering how you'll ever get those big boots dry.

    I'll wonder right along with you...

    To each his or her own, of course. It's just A way of doing business. There are lots of successful ways!

    Taylor

    Taylor

  14. #14

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    Quote Originally Posted by Marc Taylor View Post
    Okay, here's how it's done:

    Don't shop for boots that won't get wet, because they all will. Shop for boots that will get DRY once they are wet.

    I NEVER sheep or goat hunt in a waterproof boot.

    For the last 4 years, my "boot" was a Merrell Chameleon hiking shoe, mid-height. Non-waterproof.

    This year I'm going to give the Sawtooth model a try. They waterproofed the Chameleons in '09.

    The weight savings is worth the damp feet. Damp feet dry for 10-hours per night in my sleeping bag. The Merrells nearly dry out overnight in my tent, tipped up with the heal down. With a fresh pair of socks, they feel actually dry. I take a pair of SealSkinz waterproof socks for when and if the water is just too much.

    There. The secret is out.

    After just one drying afternoon you're back to square one with dry feet and dry shoes.

    I'll say the most important part again; the weight savings is worth the damp feet.

    Taylor
    As much as I hate to admit it. Taylor is right (for just this once) I hike all summer in salomon non-waterproof hiking shoes due to the fact that water crossings and swamp crossings are frequent and often knee deep. Just accept the fact that you will get wet feet. Like Marc mentioned your feet get to dry out once at camp for 6-10 hours. So long as the boot/shoe is good fitting it shouldn't have much affect on the blister end of things and as long as they get to dry out over night you should have no ill effects. Plus GTX boots weigh a lot more when wet. Whenever my Lowas are done (I've had them for 3 years now so maybe 2 years from now) I'll likely go non-gtx for my hunting boots like I already do for my hiking shoes.

    Oh yeah and Marc I'll be in for the crampons on Tuesday.

  15. #15

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    Quote Originally Posted by doogiehauz View Post
    I love my cabelas meindal alaska hunters, tuff awesome ankle support and not overly expensive.
    Agreed. These are awesome.

    I've also heard a lot of good things about Kenetrek. Supposed to be excellent boots as well.

  16. #16
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK Predator View Post
    Agreed. These are awesome.

    I've also heard a lot of good things about Kenetrek. Supposed to be excellent boots as well.
    Kennetrek has some new boots out I believe but I am not overly impressed w/ the Mountain Extreme's. They fit great then you get them wet and they streeeeetch to the point you can't get them tight. Not a good thing in a mountain boot! I have said this before and have a couple PM's from people who have said they wished they had heeded my warning before plopping down their money on them. I wear thicker socks and will be putting in thicker insoles next season but these are definitely my last pair. I am going to try on the Lowa hunter GTX and Scarpa Liskamm's for my next set. In my mind you can't put a price on good boots! They are the single biggest game changer on a long hunt followed closely by your tent, sleeping bag, and pack. Hard to hunt if you can't walk or sleep!!

  17. #17
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    I ended up getting the Lowa Hunter GTX Extreme (bought at Wilderness Way in Soldatna). My wife nearly passed out when I told her I spent $400 on "a pair of shoes"

    So far they seem like they fit well, I walked aroung the store for about 1/2 hour in them and did the same in the back yard at home. I hope they live up to the price tag... time will tell.

  18. #18
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    I think your feet will appreciate your investment! Many hunters swear by those boots and they are built to last.

  19. #19
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    I hiked 40mi in my new lowa GTX sheep hunting last year & Love them ,dry fast,light,& all the support I needed..buying some for the fiance for her DS204 hunt..

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