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Thread: 9.3x62mm & other 9.3s

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default 9.3x62mm & other 9.3s

    Anyone on the forum use or have used the 9.3x62mm for hunting big game like moose, bear, elk or other species of animals? Was wondering how well the bullets perform and what brand and grain of bullets are you hunters using or have used, and what ranges work best for this cartridge based on your bullet selection. Also do you think the 9.3 in general is a good cartridge for Alaska?
    Read that there are a handful of rifle cartridges that use this diameter bullet, like the 9.3x57mm, 9.3x74mmR, 9.3x64mm Brenneke and more recently the 9.3x66 Sako. Seems to me from my reading that the 9.3x62mm is a good cartridge, but I can't say for sure since I don't have any real world experience with one yet. Thanks in advance.

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    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    I don't own one nor have I ever shot an animal with one. I have shot several 9.3x74s in double rifles and they are a pleasure to shoot. Those friends have used them for bear and moose with good results. I would expect the same for any of the other 9.3s. Not the most flat shooting for sheep or goats, but for most anything else in Alaska I think it would be great. Again the recoil on these is very tollerable. I would think they could easily be a 300 yard gun if need be, but more than capable for out to 200 yards. The standard 9.3 loading is usually with a 286 grain bullet. I'm not sure who all makes 9.3 bullets. The 9.3x74 is a rimmed cartridge meant for break action rifles or rolling block rifles, so unless that's the type of action you're going for I'd look at one of the other 9.3s. The 9.3x62 is MUCH more common for loaded ammo or parts than the other 9.3s you mentioned, so I'd consider that one.

    Brett

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    I really enjoy my 9.3x62. I have settled on the 286 Nosler Partition for everything. I've had good accuracy with every bullet I've tried including the 250 Accubond and 270 grain Speer Hot Cor (most accurate). It's been a easy cartridge to load for in my experience and has not been at all tempermental. I would consider this a 250-300yd rifle which for me covers everything (BTW I'm not a sheep hunter!) I think this is a very suitable cartridge for Alaska and I don't regret buying mine at all - plus it has an interesting history.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I'm hoping the 9.3x66 Sako (ie. 370 Sako) makes a good showing in this country.

    So far its not looking good. The very little I've messed with 9.3x 62 I got the impression from several folks that they kill game much better than the ballistics show.

  5. #5

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    Hodgeman - I agree. I'm actually choosing this rifle over any others to be the go to rifle for me and consequently, I'm having mine refinished with a more weather resistant finish.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Cartridge sure does have an interesting history, developed by a gunsmith from Berlin name of Otto Bock in 1905 for the 1898 Mauser rifle, used by many folk in Africa as their goto rifle cause rifles then and there were inexpensive and reliable. Popular in Nordic countries of Europe for moose hunting and in Canada for moose and bear, in Australia too for sambar stag. Seems to me that this cartridge does have a strong international folowing and here it is 105 years old. Just amazing, especially when you hear of new rifles still being manufactured by companies suchas CZ, Sako, Tikka and Steyr, good bullets available too from most of the major bullet manufacturers.

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    Member hodgeman's Avatar
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    I'm pretty interested in seeing how this one works out for you. I'm thinking that at the mild velocities this round shoots at- that consistently good bullet performance would be assured. I believe in Boddington's book "Safari Rifles" he talks about seeing this with some regularity in the portions of Africa settled by the Germans. I does appear that this is popular everywhere but here.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    If everything works out I will be buying an older model rifle in the 9.3x62mm chambering. The rifle is a real classic and was built sometime in the 1950s. From the looks of it, the rifle was built around an FN action, so I am fairly confident that it is a good rifle. The Sako, CZ, Tikka and Steyr are probably all good rifles too but for some reason these days I am starting to prefer the older models with a bit of history attached to them. Never owned or even shot a 9.3 before so I am looking forward to buying this rifle and doing some shooting and hunting with it. Read the info on the 9.3 in Boddington's book just today too. Thanks

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    Good luck on the new rifle - I don't think you will be disappointed in the cartridge.

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    I have a 9.3x62 in a p14 enfield action. I've been sticking with the 286gr Nosler partition. that bullet lumbering around at 2450fps is just about perfect. I have only shot one moose with it so far, about 280 yard shot, Perfect performance behind the shoudler. I tied one of those 270gr speers as a finishing shot on a small bull and the bullet didn't even make it thru the neck, it completely disintegrated on the neck vertibrae. I wouldn't recomend the 270gr speer on anything bigger than whitetails. I havne't tried the TSX bullets yet as the nosler is just about perfection.

    My 9.3 is a scout and that fits the ballistics of the 9.3 very well. Its really tough to beat that much power in a quick handling platform that works well with stripper clips. I highly recomend the 9.3x62 as an ultimate all around alaskan game round.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    What appealed to me about this cartridge is that the case is unbelted meaning smooth feeding, the 9.3 also has a larger frontal area than my all time favorite the .358 (just a tad more), from what I read today the recoil is tolerable and manageable, wonder what that equates to in ft lbs of felt recoil (less felt recoil than my 358 Norma magnum?). Additionally the cartridge was designed for the farmers and ranchers of Africa who hunted animals for meat which also appealed to me since I am also a meat hunter. Ballistics are perfect for the ranges I am accustomed too, shots within 200 yds. Seems to me that the 9.3x62mm would be a real good moose hunting cartridge up here in Alaska. Probably be way better than the good ole 30'06 when you really think about it, 35 Whelen would be pretty close to it's equal though, what do you think?

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    Nukalpiaq - I think it is a great moose cartridge. In terms of recoil it is very easy to shoot - this coming from someone that doesn't enjoy a good belt in the shoulder. I think it recoils much like an '06 but recoil is a subjective thing based on lots of things. I'm only guessing as I haven't shot a 358 Norma but I would think the 9.3x62 would have less recoil. In terms of it's relation to the 35 Whelen it has a marginal 10% more case capacity (If memory serves) and is pretty much safe to say it is like a European 35 Whelen in most respects. It seems the old 9.3x62 is becoming a little more common place but still very much a handloader's cartridge. I did see that Federal and maybe Hornady? would be offering something in the 9.3. Of course there's also Lapua and Norma loaded ammunition if a guy can find it (Wild West Guns) does stock it at times.

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    I've shot my last two moose with a 9,3x74R in my Chapuis double. Last one was shot offhand at a lazered 287 yards or so. Lucky shot, sure, but it shows you the accuracy and knock down of the caliber.
    Also owned a Ruger 06 that was rebarreled to 9,3x62. Fantastic rifle and most likely the easiest caliber I have ever reloaded for. The 62 seems to be the most popular at the moment as 64 and 66 brass can be difficult to find. Jamisons currently has 9,3x64 brass in stock.
    The 64 is on par with the 375 H&H as far as power (and recoil) while the 66 has a little more.
    9,3x62 brass is easy to find as are bullets and reloading dies. Great caliber choice for Alaska hunting.
    Tennessee

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    Snowwolfe - What bullet did you use out of your 74? I hear a mix bag of results using the Speer which is a shame because they are very accurate out of my 62. I have settled on a load using the 286 Partition - still accurate but not quite as accurate as Speers.

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    The moose were shot with 286 gr Woodleighs. They performed pretty well but I suspect were at the limit for holding together. The one's I recovered expanded to about an inch.
    Woodleigh has a chart that suggests recommended velocity for their bullets and it is information that should be adhered to IMO.
    Have used Speers and Noslers for practice but not yet on animals.
    Tennessee

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    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    I've always been intrigued by the 9.3x62. I like big bullets and moderate velocities, in rifles with short barrels. I think I my have just talked myself into getting one. I have heard that it is possible to make 9.3x62 brass from 30-06, has anybody done this or is it even possible?
    LIVE TO HUNT....HUNT TO LIVE!!!!

  17. #17

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    Quote Originally Posted by Nukalpiaq View Post
    35 Whelen would be pretty close to it's equal though, what do you think?
    It would take a highly educated moose to recognize and additional .006" of bullet diameter and 5 additional grains of powder.

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    So the European designation for the .35 Whelen would be 9x63mm. Since the .35 Whelen was developed in 1922 by Townsend Whelen and James V. Howe, 17 years after the 9.3x62mm, makes me wonder if it was designed to compete with the 9.3x62mm for the American market, what do you folk think? or did the 9.3x62mm already have a strong market here in America? or was it more of an overseas cartridge back in the early days? Thanks

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    I can only guess it was created because of how easy it was to obtain 30-06 brass and neck it up. The 9,3's have sort of a "romantic" history about them. Stats on paper or game do not indicate any clear advantage. Sort of like a .277 vs a .284.
    It is just personal choice. Like 99 percent of the calibers in existence, something else will do almost the exact same thing.
    But once you jump up to the 9,3x64 or 66 you are entering a different ball game and equaling or surpassing 375H&H power levels in a round with no belt.
    Tennessee

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    BigSwede - If you want a 9.3x62 in a short barrel, CZ has one in a mannlicher and 20" barrel. The rifles point very nicely but I think I would prefer a little longer barrel length to help gain just a tad more velocity for this cartridge. They are nice and affordable rifles.

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