Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 32

Thread: Caldwell Lead Sled

  1. #1
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    14

    Default Caldwell Lead Sled

    Has anyone used a Caldwell Lead Sled for shooting, just wondering if it is worth the price.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Mine has paid for itself in what I have saved in wasted ammo from not using a good rest. I can shoot all day from this rest without ever hurting my shoulder. I just use the sled no extra weight added.

    Good luck

    Steve

  3. #3
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Steve

    Thanks for the info, was looking Saturday at one at Sportsmans in Fairbanks. Just did not really know anyone who has one, but your input was what i was hoping for. Thanks again

    Dan

  4. #4

    Default

    I bought the Caldwell 7 for at-home cleaning, etc., then brought it to the range with a new .375 Ruger for use with some reduced loads while I sighted in and tried out my chrony. Found it very useful, but then after two sessions had some repercussions from just shooting 200 gr. bullets at 1200 fps, like clicking noise in my jaw and minor pains in my neck and shoulder.

    So, I think I'm going to try to set up my Caldwell 7 with some recoil absorbing function as I work up larger loads. I think I heard of someone getting a detached retina from incorrect shooting. It would be a shame to have severe recoil spoil your sport.

  5. #5
    Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    FBX
    Posts
    108

    Default

    My lead sled rocks! I use 2-25# bags of shot and the savings in high power ammo for sighting in has almost really paid for it. It's nice to see how well your gun chan shoot, with little human error. Then you can;t blame the equipment if you miss a shot out in the field.

  6. #6

    Default

    A friend bought one and I used it quite a bit, then went back to my standard. I just put a 25 pound bag of shot between the butt and my shoulder on the big boomers. Works fine for me, and sure saved me a bunchabux I can now use for something else.

  7. #7
    New member
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Alaska
    Posts
    14

    Default

    Thanks for the info everyone. I am going to try and get one this weekend to use. I really appreciate your input.


    Dan

  8. #8
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Wasilla--Cantwell Transplant
    Posts
    4,600

    Default

    Steve, what's up with that trigger?

  9. #9
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hunt_ak View Post
    Steve, what's up with that trigger?
    That was a mistake I made once. The benneli has a stiff trigger that could only be lighten so much by design. That device uses leverage to lower trigger pull. It did work, but was wider than the trigger guard and was prone to accidental discharge.

    Had other pics of rifles on my sled, but that darn percent sign thing is a PITA.

    Steve

  10. #10
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    %%%%'
    Stid, the percent thing only affects the first one in a post, so put in three or for at the beginning and your pics will post fine. (Like I did here)

  11. #11
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,623

    Default

    I wouldn't consider trying to shoot groups for reloaded ammunition or sight in with out one. If you don't have access to one then YES it is indeed worth buying one!!!!!

    Brett

  12. #12
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Kodiak, Ak
    Posts
    3,175

    Default

    I bought one for the sake of Dialed In accuracy but found it still jumped around enough that, after the shot, I was spending a lot of time Redialing it in, probably would recommend getting some weight bags for it as that would undoubtedly solve the jumping around part. I was trying to use it unweighted. Found it was also a bit strange having the butt sitting in a pocket instead of against my shoulder, not like it would be in the field, so my Cheek placement was different and I didn't really like having to adjust for that.

    Mine is sitting on a shelf as I am only shooting a .270wsm and the kick factor is Nil, so I went back to good bags, which I am used to and feel work Very Well. Hoping to get back into a .300Mag soon and will probably really like that Lead Sled for extended range time then.

    I'd say if you can try one before buying, you might stick with a good set of bags, depending on what you are shooting.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  13. #13

    Default

    I've seen a lot of stocks break when a lead sled was used. I would go light with the weight you place in the bottom.
    Henry Bowman for President

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by deerhunter View Post
    I've seen a lot of stocks break when a lead sled was used. I would go light with the weight you place in the bottom.
    This has been our experience as well as a few busted scopes.

    Plus I'm like kodiakrain. I never liked the feeling of trying to shoot out of the thing. I prefer shooting off of a front rest only. I do a lot of shooting with a .358 Norma and a .500 Cyrus so there's plenty of recoil, but I still prefer not to use the lead sled.

  15. #15
    Member
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    895

    Default

    I think it changes my cheek weld and makes me shoot sloppy. I use it to sight in and then recheck my zero off the sled. It does wonders to work up loads though, and I use it for that. I also had a really bad flinch. It helped me to get over that as well.

    I cracked a Rem 700 factory stock 2 years ago on it with a 300 RUM. I use less weight now, and have a better stock. I use 2 10# weights like at the gym wrapped in a towel. I still get some recoil, but can shoot 20+ shots and still have my teeth.

    I practice more at the range now and have fun shooting so I don't use it as much. I will be working up a load for a new 300 win this winter, so will have it out more.

  16. #16

    Default

    I've just started working with reloads in .375 Ruger using 200 gr. RNs as I break in the barrel and make economical decisions about enjoying range shooting. After firing some 20 reduced rounds in two sessions, I already am feeling some negatives, such as pains in three places and a cracking noise in the jaw, so I'm looking seriously at the "lead sled" concept.

    Thing is, I already have the Caldwell 7 and would like to customize it enough to reduce recoil by 10+ lbs. Will try to use bungee cord going around the butt, plus maybe a cord to a plastic 5 gal. can of water for weight.

    By the time I try to work up some 300 gr. Barnes at about 2,400 fps, I could use some cushion.

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    3,568

    Default

    Tried using one on three different occassions. Wasnt impressed at all. It does help with reducing felt recoil but a rear sandbag and a quality front rest allows me to shoot tighter groups than the lead sled ever did.
    Tennessee

  18. #18
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    Anchorage
    Posts
    1,623

    Default

    I've done both Randy and I definitely have an appreciation for the lead sled! It makes it easier, but with good technique you can certainly shoot excellent groups with the sand bags. My best group ever was with a .25-06 and sand bags. It was .26" or .27". Where I really think the lead sled comes into its own is with heavier recoiling weapons. My best from a lead slead was a .47ish" group from a .375 Ruger. I doubt I could have done that off of bags.

    Brett

  19. #19
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Palmer, AK
    Posts
    11,415

    Default

    I am in the "like em" group. Certainly not a replacement for regular shooting in field positions but it certainly takes the sting out of siting in, especially if you are like me and tend to drag 1/2 the arsenal to the range in the spring after getting bored over the winter and doing the scope swap shuffle. New ziess for moose gun to replace leupy, leupy moves to bou gun, Nikon moves to backup gun to replace weaver, weaver shifts to 17hmr for predators..... I know I am not the only one who does this all too often...

  20. #20
    Member hodgeman's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Delta Junction AK
    Posts
    4,055

    Default

    I like them for rough zeroing and seeing what a particular load is capable of in a particular rifle but after that I never shoot off one and I generally don't use much weight so recoil reduction isn't too pronounced. Once a particular load is chosen and the rifle is zeroed I'll shoot from field positions nearly exclusively after that. It seems I'm only bothered by recoil from the bench anyway.

    I'm amazed at how your POI will shift going from a lead sled to prone off bags even though the group size may not change substantially.

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •