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Thread: My hunting partner is lost what not to do.

  1. #1
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    Default My hunting partner is lost what not to do.

    If you or your hunting partner is lost, do you know what to do and what you should not do?

    Several years ago I went hunting with two very experience hunters who had been hunting together for several years. One of the guys had his 25 year old son with him. They got turn around and could not find there way out, they were just 3 or 400 yards from a swamp and home. They had no GPS or compass and were bow hunting so they could not fire a location shot. When it got dark they were screwed, stumbling around in the brush and no flashlight for 7 hrs. What added to there frustration was his partner kept driving up and down the swamp firing his 44 until he rand out of ammunition. That turned out to be a blessing, because they walk to the last gun shot and found the swamp.

    I know what to do and I carry most items to get home and was surprise to find out my very experience hunting partners were a couple of dummies.

    Have you ever talked to your partner and discuss what to do if you or he gets lost?
    Do you carry a whistle, or compass?

  2. #2
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    I always carry fire starter and proper rain gear. If I get lost by the time it's dark I stop moving and settle in for the night. My hunting partners know not to look for me until daylight. We discuss this before every hunt. I will also hunker down for the night even if I know where I am, but it gets dark and travel wouldn't be wise.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  3. #3
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    Nothing can beat knowing how to properly land navigate when all else fails. I always have my gps and use that as a primary, but will always have a compass and a map. I do a map check every mile or so Ive walked. I have learned the hard way in the army about relying on technology to guide you. Land navigation is definently a skill that has fallen by the wayside. There have been many a hunter who walked 5 miles or more off the Dalton but were only 3.5 or 4 miles off the road and ended up with a nice lil fine after they shot their bou. The response when confronted by a trooper " but my gps said i walked this far". Prior to hunting with someone, especially in the middle of nowhere, I would definently discuss survival skills and land navigation. A good hunting partner is sometimes harder to find than a compatible wife

  4. #4
    Member Erik in AK's Avatar
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    I always carry firestarter, rain gear, a whistle and a signal mirror (you know, to touch up my make up). When hunting with a partner(s) I make a point of discussing our orientation; camp, landmarks, distant peaks ect. I always talk about the lost "what if" too. My advice to my partners is if they are good physically to stop, admit being lost and think before stomping off in a panic. If we are in hilly or mountainous terrain I suggest climbing to get a better visual picture but if unsure, exhausted or hurt? Stay put and build a fire. Since I bring extra whistles everybody gets one. 3 blasts every 5 minutes until you hear a reply. During the pre-hunt planning I also nag my partners to have maps of their own and a compass. GPS is fine but Murphy hates GPS.

    Good topic.
    If cave men had been trophy hunters the Wooly Mammoth would be alive today

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by ga2akwild View Post
    A good hunting partner is sometimes harder to find than a compatible wife
    And finding one that fits both criteria is even harder.

    That said I always carrying enough gear to hole up for the night when out dayhunting away from camp. If it gets dark you can often make a bad situation MUCH worse by continuing to wander around aimlessly in the dark. If it gets dark and I am lost, just hole up make your save as least umcomfortable as possible and have an understanding with your hunting partner to not go looking for you until you have daylight to work with. No sense either of you putting yourselves in harms way IMO.

  6. #6
    Member broncoformudv's Avatar
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    Uhh don't get lost in the first place and keep a leash on your hunting partners does the trick for me.

    Now the trick is keeping my wife from getting overly worried when she has not heard from me for a few hours and alerting everyone.

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