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Thread: Yamaha 4 stroke electric start

  1. #1
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    Default Yamaha 4 stroke electric start

    I admit I have not read my manual. Like I know where it is!!!!

    If you arrive at the boat to find your battery is dead and have no other battery available....how do you start these motors?

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    You just push start the boat Pid, or have someone pull you then kick it into gear. :-)

    Seriously though, there has to be a place for a rope to go on the flywheel. Even my Honda 90 has such a notch, though I've never had to use it. I do now carry one of those emergency starters for jumping the battery just in case. I once had to run up to NAPA in Homer to get another battery when I found mine was totally dead at the boat launch.

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    The flywheel is concealed within a shroud that isn't easily removable that I could see. And there was no rope like there used to be in the 2-stroke cowls. You may be right, but it wasn't intuitive, and on the river in the wind, rain, and mosquitoes? Intuitive means plainly visible. Besides, the battery was low but not dead. It spun the motor but it wouldn't fire. I don't think I could have pulled it faster than it was spinning, but I need to find out. I pulled a battery out of a 4-wheeler and made emergency jumpers out of a piece of 2 conductor wire I found in a neighbor's yard. That worked.

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    Member sayak's Avatar
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    Them Yammies!
    I know a guy who had a brand new Yamaha 4-stroker snow machine he took into the hills. The battery went dead, and to his surprise, no provision was made for pull starting it. He has since sold it.

    Good McGivering on the 4-wheeler battery and jumpers. That's old time Alaska thinking.

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    My 2009 Yamaha 40/30 jet has a grove around the top of the flywheel where you can wrap a rope. It even came with a short piece with a handle on it. Dunno about the bigger motors.

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    I found a Yamaha on-line owner's manual and my motor does have a notch in the flywheel to use a rope to pull start it. I guess I need to familiarize myself with how to remove the flywheel shroud, and then try to start it with a rope. After all, emergency procedures aren't much good if a guy doesn't know how to apply them. It'll be interesting to see how fast I need to spin it in order to fire the electronics. I think I'll disconnect the battery just to keep it real.

    I had a Yami 4-stroke snowmachine. One of the first things I did was to make some jumper cables for it. I still have them even though the machine is gone. Next trip they'll go into the boat's tool box.

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    It will take a good tug to pull start the 4-stroke Yammi's, and always check your battery charge level. If everything works ok then a good charge in the spring is all I do all season. And you will not be able to run your outboard on a week battery as it will keep on dying.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Quote Originally Posted by MARV1 View Post
    And you will not be able to run your outboard on a week battery as it will keep on dying.
    Could you explain this? That motor should run reguardless of weather the battery is good, bad, or missing. Maybe I'm miss understanding what you mean.

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    My battery spun my motor at what I thought was an adequate rate but not as fast as a fully charged battery would. My electronic ignition would not fire until I jumped it. I was surprised by that. I don't think I can pull the motor with a rope faster than it was turning with the weak battery. But I need to find out. With snowmachines my wife can't develop enough pull speed to start her sled. In that case there's a magic speed that will fire the engine. Anything less won't do it. This boat motor looks like the same thing. As for sustained running? My motor runs when I disconnect the battery. I have checked that.

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    The alternator will put out more than enough power to keep the engine running even with a weak or dead battery.

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    I found my boat had a dead battery again. This time I figured out how to open the flywheel shroud. Very simple. Pull up on the rear of the shroud, Duh! I used the emergence rope to try to start the boat with a very, very dead battery. It started in one pull. The rope is rather long and I was concerned if I didn't pull it free it would wrap around the flywheel, so I gave it a pretty good heave. Absolutely no problem. After I fouled the grate with weeds I had to stop the motor to clear the jet, so I got to do it again. Same result. Easy.

  12. #12

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    Mr. Pid,

    I might have missed it in your posts, but what HP Yamaha 4 Stroke do you have? I'm really curious now if I can pull start my 150. It'd sure make me feel better if I knew i could.

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    F60. I didn't have much confidence that could spin it fast enough but it turns out I can. I have no idea how yours might be to start.

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    Are you sure it wasn't just the starter spinning and not making contact with the flywheel - that happens occasionally with a low battery...

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    EFI outboards need a good battery, carbed models do not. The injectors need a certain amount of power to pump fuel and it all goes through the battery even with the alternator.
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    I hope somebody with a fuel injected engine tests that theory. I've never found an engine that wouldn't run after disconnecting the battery as long as the alternator was working. To start one with a dead battery would be interesting as well. Do the big 6 cyl engines come with an emergency flywheel rope? If I was an ocean-going guy with a single engine I'd want to know. But I'm just a lowly river guy with an F60 that CAN be started with a rope.

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    If I am reading you correctly I would NOT, repeat NOT remover a battery from an engine, that is running.
    You could burn up the alternator, the battery controls how much voltage the alternator is putting out, removing the battery could tell the alternator to put out maximum voltage. Will this happen in every case, I do not know, why risk destroying something?

    I have heard of guys that switch off they battery thinking they were going to a 2nd battery and had to replace the alternator.

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    I did with my F60 to prove it would run with no battery. It does. I've done it with lots of engines. Regulators control charge voltage, not batteries.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I did with my F60 to prove it would run with no battery. It does. I've done it with lots of engines. Regulators control charge voltage, not batteries.
    You are correctly the regulator does control the output. Depending on the design of the regulator, it needs a battery to supply current for charging and tell the regulator how much voltage/current to put out.
    Removing the battery when a engine is running is not something a person would normally do. If you wanted to see if a engine would run with out a battery I have no problem with that, in fact itís a good idea.
    I just did not want you to blow something.


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    batteries are relatively cheap and when one loses its charge completely it never gets back up to maximum. in a boat you dont want to take chances on a dead battery if you dont have a spare. just get a new one and use that one in something else. plus always carry jumpers in every vehicle and boat.
    those that leave there boats away for some time, those small solar chargers do work to keep your battery up to full voltage without overcharging.

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