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Thread: another question about rigging ... two hooks on a line

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    Default another question about rigging ... two hooks on a line

    Asked in my first thread about the use of jigs in saltwater up there. Now I see in Alaskas regulation book that you can have two hooks on a line. One of the rigs we use in TX involves fishing a jig with a smaller lure dropshotted above it - say a streamer fly or a 'hootchie' (if I understand what y'all mean by 'hootchie' that is!)

    So far as I can tell, this is legal by AK regs ... does anybody use rigs like this there? From the feedback on my previous thread & reading through older threads, it seems like salmon would clobber this sort of rigging. Yes? No?

    We'll be up in Ketchikan Saturday ... one way or another, I'll find out, eh?

  2. #2

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    You can buy "mooching rigs" that have two hooks inline, but I tie my own so I can get the proper spacing between hooks for the size of troll herring I'm using. I also use hoochies above the first hook regularly. They are indeed very deadly for salmon, though I prefer threading my line through the herring with a "herring needle" and then just imbedding a single treble hook in the tail of the herring. Much deadlier than the mooching rig method.
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    Mutt, I was actually asking about the use of a feather or skirted hook tied with a dropper loop above a heavy jig. I have read some of the threads on here about tying a two-hook rig for cut herring - and thank you to the posters who have done so!

    Just wondering if the 'jig & fly' is something used up there.

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    We have had some success with white or glow hoochies (with a single trailer hook rigged to lie just at the end of the tentacles) fastened to the main line from a loop about 2 feet above the regular jig we may be using. I put this down if the fishing seems to be slow. While jigging the spread up and down it has a higher profile and is more visible to fish in all directions.

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek the Greek View Post
    Mutt, I was actually asking about the use of a feather or skirted hook tied with a dropper loop above a heavy jig. I have read some of the threads on here about tying a two-hook rig for cut herring - and thank you to the posters who have done so!

    Just wondering if the 'jig & fly' is something used up there.
    Not that I've ever heard of or seen. I'd say there are more effective ways to fish than a rig like that, which is probably why it isn't used. But you never know. It might just be "the secret weapon" someone out there uses and they just won't tell people that. I've caught silvers with a bass crank bait before, but it isn't the MOST effective method going.
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  6. #6

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    Nobody I know dropshots around here that I've seen.. Give it a shot and report back... but I doubt you'll be able to outfish the traditional methods.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek the Greek View Post
    Asked in my first thread about the use of jigs in saltwater up there. Now I see in Alaskas regulation book that you can have two hooks on a line. One of the rigs we use in TX involves fishing a jig with a smaller lure dropshotted above it - say a streamer fly or a 'hootchie' (if I understand what y'all mean by 'hootchie' that is!)

    So far as I can tell, this is legal by AK regs ... does anybody use rigs like this there? From the feedback on my previous thread & reading through older threads, it seems like salmon would clobber this sort of rigging. Yes? No?

    We'll be up in Ketchikan Saturday ... one way or another, I'll find out, eh?

  7. #7

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    I do it bass ackwards to most folks. Why use a plain weight when you can get jigs of the same weight? On a leader above there might be bait, might be a hoochie, might be a fly. Only requirement technique-wise is that the leader be stiff enough not to wrap around the main line as the jig drops to the bottom. Toughest to manage is with a largish bait up there like half a herring- anything big and water resistant with lots of spin.

  8. #8

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    I do it with a 16oz.-10" grub jig with a 5" Storm swimbait 16"s above. Works great in Ling and Rockfish areas. I`ve had salmon follow it to the surface also.


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  9. #9

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    I use a similar set up in the northeast. They call that fly above the jig/spoon a 'teaser'.
    I use it when Im surf casting.

    Basically what I do is have a 2-3 ounce Krocodile spoon at the end of my line, and about 24 inches above that, I will have a smaller fly or 'teaser'. I cast out and use a steady retrieve, NOT a jig motion.

    The scenario it creates in the water, is one bigger fish (Kroc) chasing a smaller fish (teaser). I'd have to say Ive caught just as many fish on the teaser as I have on the Kroc. Im guessing that, just the competition for the smaller fish is often enough to make the fish strike. Unsure though...just guessing.
    Also, sometimes if the fish arent feeding heavily, they will only take the smaller fly.

    Try it out. If I had a boat, I would have already done it! haha!

    good luck
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    Quote Originally Posted by AK2AZ View Post
    I do it with a 16oz.-10" grub jig with a 5" Storm swimbait 16"s above. Works great in Ling and Rockfish areas. I`ve had salmon follow it to the surface also.
    As mentioned, it does work up here, sometimes extremely well. However if your jig uses two hooks, you can't use the setup. I use 300# mono with a corkscrew swivel @ the bottom to connect to the jig, and a barrel swivel with a 10/0 hook tied w/ 80# mono at the top. Use a corkscrew swivel on your main line and it's a quick change to add the leader w/ teaser hook, or not. I've used the berkley gulp 3" herring/shad's on the teaser w/ great effect on rockfish, and the occasional silver. Just make sure everyone on deck is aware of the second hook as it poses an additional hazard when it doesn't have a fish on it.


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    soda, yeah we call it a teaser fly as well & the theory is as you described.

    Paul, is the green squid-type jig what you guys call a hootchie? When I'm deep-dropping in the Gulf, I'll use a large diamond jig with a dropper loop jig similar to that tied above it - usually a spider hitch knot, as it tends to make the teaser stand away from the main line & avoids tangles.

    Will give it a try along with the more conventional techniques & see what works.

  12. #12
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    What we call a hootchie is any of the various squid type skirts, they come in a variety of colors and color combinations. They are most commonly used when mooching for coho, but will catch other fish.



    This is what I like to bait the hook with, but a small piece of herring also works well.



    I haven't had problems with tangling, the key is short stiff piece of mono.

  13. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Zeek the Greek View Post
    soda, yeah we call it a teaser fly as well & the theory is as you described.

    Paul, is the green squid-type jig what you guys call a hootchie? When I'm deep-dropping in the Gulf, I'll use a large diamond jig with a dropper loop jig similar to that tied above it - usually a spider hitch knot, as it tends to make the teaser stand away from the main line & avoids tangles.

    Will give it a try along with the more conventional techniques & see what works.
    I thought you were talking about salmon fishing. You said something about using a rig for salmon and what you're talking about is for halibut. If Paul H. is using it for salmon I'd like to find out where THOSE salmon are that you need to use 300# mono and a 10/0 hook for. I want some of those.
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    I have had coho's hit the teaser rig while dropping the rig on a rockpile looking for lings and rockfish, but no, it is not what I use when targeting salmon. But the fun part of ocean fishing is you never know what's going to hit your rig when you drop it over the side

  15. #15

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    Yeah, people catch salmon out in K-Bay quite often when they drop chunks of herring down for halibut on typical halibut rigs. But Zeek asked about using this sort of rig for salmon which is why I took it in the direction I did. Not quite sure why it progressed into rigging for halibut.

    So to answer his original question, like I said, it isn't used as a method for targeting salmon that I've ever heard of and there are much more effective methods to use.
    Year round saltwater fishing adventures in Homer, AK.
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