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Thread: OPTIC TRAINNING. Teach Me Please

  1. #1
    Member powderhound's Avatar
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    Question OPTIC TRAINNING. Teach Me Please

    Alright I have a Rem 300 Ultra Mag that I am comfortable with currently. I mounted up a cheap Nikon 3x9x40 scope on it. I did well moose hunting last year with it. Took a 100 yd shot and was pleased with my results.
    This year I would like to upgrade my scope.
    I would like the option to take a longer shot if needed. I currently do not like the looks of my target @ 200+ yards.
    I am considering a Leupold 3x9x50 or a 4x12x40
    Which scope will display my target better at 200+ yards? I know there is a heated debate about taking long shots, I would rather we stay on the current topic here. Please teach me about the Optics.
    I would love to learn more about them.
    Thank You Gentlemen

  2. #2
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
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    I also have a 300RUM, I have a 4.5-14 50mm VXL mounted to it, it is all that is needed for me. As far as your choices I'd pick the 3x9x50 just get better glass, look for it in the VX-3 line. For seeing the target better at long range go with the 4-12 or higher, just remember its harder to hold zero at higher power levels when shooting off hand.
    I have a 3x9-50mm VX-2 on my 270 and there is no compairison between the two, I usually have it on 4 or 5 power already and most of my shooting is past a 100 yrds.
    No matter what you pick, going with a higher grade scope will make all the difference. Buy the best you can afford and you'll have a gun forever

  3. #3
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    If you are only looking to take shots 400 yards and under then a Zeiss Conquest 3-9x40 would be perfect. Doug has good deals on them too. I personally don't see a need for objectives over 40mm for most normal AK hunting. If you get up into the real long range w/ 15x or more it would probably be worthwhile. Zeiss sopes also have constant eye relief which is a blessing on a big boomer like the RUM. My zeiss has the same 4" at 3 power that it has at 9x. With the Leupold scopes you have to inch forward on the stock to see clearly as you increase the power. Makes it fun when prone and reeeeaaaallllyy concentrating on that distant animal, gently squeeze the trigger and feel the bite of scope against your eyebrow and the warm flow of blood as it drains down your face.

  4. #4
    Member powderhound's Avatar
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    so you guys recommend me to get the 50 power over the 4x12? I am having a hard time seeing my target large enough at long distance. I currently have a cheap buckmaster. What about the Leupold Var 2's? are they any good?

  5. #5
    Member HuntNBgame's Avatar
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    The 50mm will gather more light in lower light conditions (mornings & late evening) than the 40mm will. You can get the 50mm in 4-12 power. The VX-2 is what I have on my 270, at the time it was my first rifle purchase and the best scpoe I could afford, and it is still on there if that tells you anything.That one is 3-9x50.
    As LuJon stated alot of guys in Alaska do not use Obj. as big as 50mm. But a gun as heavey as the 300RUM the little weight difference in the 50mm doen't matter much.
    In optics you get what you pay for. I have 6 Leupolds and just bought my first Zeiss this year from Doug at Camera Land, he is a forum sponsor on here and might have some leftovers. Mine was a show model. Doug doesn't carry Leupolds, but if the price is right for a ConQuest jump on it. Plus he offers discounts to forum members.

    If it were me in your shoes I would save a little longer and get a VX-3 in 4.5-14x50mm or the Zeiss Conquest in 44mm.
    They have better glass then the Vx-2, but if thats your budget it will be alot better then what you have now.
    Good luck!

  6. #6

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    I've been really happy with the Nikon Monarch 2.5x10 I have on my .375. Last year I hunted a new area that's very open and ranged my bull at 427 yards. Waayyyy further than I like to shoot but took the opportunity and hit him good and down he went.
    I personally really enjoy this scope.

  7. #7

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    powerhound,

    If I'm not too late to comment, well here goes... I shoot known-distance at the range fairly often. A while back I found myself asking the same question, but for paper targets.

    IMHO, there are a couple of things that you may want to think about:
    1) you want the exit pupil size to be 4mm or greater to transmit adequate light and be easier to see, in general
    2) magnification is GREAT for stationary targets, but too much is useless for moving or locating distant targets (tunnel vision)
    3) at higher magnification any normal physiological unsteadyness (heartbeat, breathing, muscle twitch) is magnified and your cross hairs will move all over the target

    To determine exit pupil size in mm, divide the objective mm size by the magnification (you want that number to be at or over a 4). For example, if you have a 40mm objective lens you can go up to 10 power before you can start to compromise your sight picture. If you have a 50mm objective lens, then you can move up to 12.5 power magnification and still should have a good sight picture. For moving targets and/or in darker environments this becomes more important. Speaking about objective lens, the 50mm will allow more light (sight picture) through the scope than a 40 mm scope of the same quality; if you are a low light hunter, think about going big on the objective.

    If you are a bench shooter at a shooting range then you can move up to a 20 or more power scope because you have a pristine stationary shooting environment. I have a 6.5-20 with a 50mm objective lens for my target rifle. I run it up to max power for my shooting range work but if I was to hunt, depending on distance to the critter, I'd buy another scope that could start at 4 power.

    Good glass can cost good money. Bad glass can cost you the sight picture that you need to hit your target. Will you shoot with the rifle supported by a tree-stand, tree branch, or will you fire off-handed? Will the game be moving? At 200 yards I see no problem with having a 12 or 14 power scope, sighting it in at max power so you know it is precise, then going down to 4 or 4.5 power for scanning/hunting. When you locate your target, you make the judgment call of how much power you need because you will have it.

    Good luck!

    AJ

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