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Thread: Silver flies - Coneheads or no?

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    Default Silver flies - Coneheads or no?

    Do you like your flies with coneheads or nothing up front? Seems like most flies I see don't have anything and are un-weighted.

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    Member icb12's Avatar
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    Personally I like them with cones.

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    Member 900fusion's Avatar
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    i like using dolly llamas in olive/white
    -Tight Lines & head shakin

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    Premium Member Wyo2AK's Avatar
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    All of the above.

    The more options you have in your fly box to mess around with when fish get lock jaw, the better you'll be. Weighted, unweighted, coneheads, dumbbells, whatever... depending on where you are, water conditions (high, low, cloudy, clear)... the more options regarding weight and color, the better set you'll be. Stay busy behind the vise until you're ready to hit the water.

    The greatest thing about tying your own is being able to have some of everything, and to be able to tie what you think will be best for the situation.

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    Member mossyhorn's Avatar
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    This may be a dumb question but I've never fished for silvers before. How do you know what's best for a given situation? Or is it just throw whatever you're feeling at the moment and keeping changing till something works?

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    Best can vary a lot from hour to hour, even on the same fish in the same location. Bring a variety and keep changing till you find what works. Bring lots of variety- large and small, weighted and unweighted, plus color and material variations.

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    Member alaskachuck's Avatar
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    Throw the whole fly box at them. As was said above. One fly works then does not. Change up. Soemtimes the same one works. You ever know. Changes every 5 minutes like the weather and my wifes mind
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    Member woodman6437's Avatar
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    As far as colors go my general strategy is this: Dark colors (purple) when it is bright out, light (pink) when it is overcast. Black flies for off color water. I also recently read an article that says chartuese shows up best in deep water (3' to 15'). Can's go wrong with a dalai lama though. Seems to slay anything in the water. Oh, and the infamous purple ESL.

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    I almost always fish something heavy for silvers. they like the bottom, so it's nice to have a fly that gets down there. I love the purple ESL, and a chartruese clouser rarely disappoints. I'm new to the Dolly Lama this year so I'll have to get back on that one.
    I'd agree with you, but then we'd both be wrong.

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    Something else to consider is your line. Floating, sinking, intermediate? You want your presentation near the bottom but not on it. Slow, shallow water less weight, faster, deeper water more weight. Some kind of weight up front though, jig action is good. Good tying!

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    Member Lake creek fishermen's Avatar
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    Try a unweighted conehead popsikle with about a 10ft leader with floating line! If you arent getting it down add some odd amounts of split shot.

    Also must add. Silvers will take most flys but when tight jawed they can strike on the weirdest things! Be prepared to switchout to find the hot fly.
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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mossyhorn View Post
    This may be a dumb question but I've never fished for silvers before. How do you know what's best for a given situation? Or is it just throw whatever you're feeling at the moment and keeping changing till something works?
    Goal: In streams, usually silvers are moving upstream, pausing in depressions or other places that give them an easy hangout from the current. Most of these sheltered locations will be at the bottom. Usually your goal is to present your fly to fish along the bottom.

    Methods: The coneheads, dumbbell eyes or other methods of weighting a fly will help get your fly down to where the silvers (or other salmon, or trout) usually are. Like rippinlip says, you'll get more action by weighting flies up front (coneheads, dumbbell eyes) compared to weighting the whole thing (with lead wire wraps). Other methods of using weight to get your fly down deep are to mash on some split shot on the tippet, or use a sinking fly line, or sink tip. Split shot ahead of the fly to gets it down to the bottom - and split shot is a good way to fine-tune for depth as conditions (stream depth, current speed) change. Sink-tip: are handy for me on one stream in the Fall. Most guys do fine with floating lines.

    Good luck.

    In fact, I never fished unweighted flies until one spring when I hooked both a Rainbow and a sockeye with subsurface flies...flies that I was actually retrieving when the fish attacked them near the surface. Now, I tie and carry some unweighted flies too.

  14. #14

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    I fish both.

    First, there are some back water areas fish will suspend and coho's in particular like to chase, or they are down right spooky and anything weighted will send them back to the ocean.

    Second fishing a short leader and a sink tip is much more fun then something with a ton of lead on it! And it's just as effective!

    All that said I DO carry weighted flies, both cones and dumbells or just wire wrapped and find myself fishing both weighted and unweighted about the same amount of the time. Carry BOTH!

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