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Thread: Wish Barnes still made old style copper and lead bullets

  1. #1
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    Default Wish Barnes still made old style copper and lead bullets

    I am almost out of my old 275 (really 276) grain Barnes 358 caliber bullets...
    Oh how I long for at least one more box of them....

    By the price tag on the old box, I picked this last box at Longs Drugs some years back...
    They were $29.33

    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails 358 caliber 001.jpg  
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
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  2. #2

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    I used to mourn them until I was introduced to Hawk Bullets. They're the same bullet with lots of choices in weights and jacket thicknesses, just like the Good Old Days with the original Barnes company. You won't be disappointed. They've got 358 spitzers to 265 grains, RN's including 275's and even 300's, with jackets up to .050.

  3. #3
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    I think I will give them a try.. I like how the Kodiak Bonded bullets work on impact, but they are not as accurate as I would like them to be...
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  4. #4

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    In my experience with both the original Barnes and the Hawks, you won't get "match" accuracy, but it will be plenty good for hunting. For whatever reason the larger calibers always seem to deliver somewhat tighter groups than the smaller. Hawk may be seeing the same thing, because sad to say, they don't make anything smaller than .264 diameter. The old Barnes 125 grain .257 bullets were my favorites for 25-06, but they seldom did better than 1.5" at 100, and 2" was more typical.

    I haven't shot enough of the Kodiak's to reply with any confidence, but accuracy of the Hawks might or might not be any better depending on the particular rifle.

  5. #5
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    The Kodiaks do very very as far as expansion and weight retention, (I have tried about 4 boxes so far. ) but on the 275s the base is seems to be quite a bit bigger on some in the box than others. If I go through the box and weigh / sort them all, and then trim uneven lead from the nose, then it helps accuracy to a great extent.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

  6. #6

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    I bought some Barnes bullets from an old-timer to use for handloading my .375 Ruger, got the 235 and 300 grain, plus some 270 Hornady's. I'll be using factory loads for big game, plus maybe a 260 Nosler if the accuracy on my new rifle works out. Like you say, the bigger calibers supposedly like the bigger bullets, maybe due to sectional density, or something. Probably I went for the old Barnes just because of the nostalgia associated with the .375 H & H.
    Last edited by bookburn; 07-26-2010 at 22:24. Reason: add note

  7. #7

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    I think you'll be impressed if you go ahead and whack some game with those old Barnes. And if it becomes a habit, check out Hawk.

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