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Thread: The "almost shrimp thief" that wasn't

  1. #1

    Default The "almost shrimp thief" that wasn't

    A little embarassing, but maybe good for a chuckle or even a lesson.
    In needed 800 feet of poly line for some new pots. The line came in 1,200-ft. spools, so that's what I bought. I measured off 800 feet from the spool and set it aside in the garage a few weeks ago.
    Was getting ready for last weekend on the water and grabbed the 800 feet and loaded it on the boat.
    Dropped 3 strings of pots in the usual place, 600 feet depth. First string had the new 800 feet of line. As I was heading over to the next spot to drop the next string, the person I was taking fishing said he couldn't see my buoy anymore. The water was a little rough, so I said that's probably the reason. I set out the rest of my pots and then headed back over to the first string I'd put out. Had some trouble finding it. The buoy was about half submerged and occasionally was going under. I grabbed the string to drag it over to a shallower area, trying to figure out what was going on. As I'm dragging my string, I look on my sonar and see the three pots I'm dragging. The bottom one is 200off the bottom. What I'd done was forget that when I measured off the line from the spool, I'd measured off the amount that left 800 feet on the spool and I was going to take the spool with me on the boat. Instead, I took with me the 400 feet that I'd meant to leave behind. Guess now I know that an A-1 will float 3 pots. I also know that you can't catch many shrimp at 250 feet, which was where I had to put the string for the weekend. I know there are people who steal pots, but this is one instance where I could have been one of those people who thought someone stole their pots when in reality I'd just screwed up.

  2. #2
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    sky diver you use poly for your shrimp gear? Poly is fine for the bridle and a couple hundred feet but you need to use sinking line the rest of the way. If I drive by a buoy w/ a bunch of floating line, I'll be pulling the pots. They'll be by the harbormaster shack in Whittier if you want them back.

  3. #3

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    Quote Originally Posted by fullbush View Post
    sky diver you use poly for your shrimp gear? Poly is fine for the bridle and a couple hundred feet but you need to use sinking line the rest of the way. If I drive by a buoy w/ a bunch of floating line, I'll be pulling the pots. They'll be by the harbormaster shack in Whittier if you want them back.
    I use poly and I use weights to keep the line from floating. You'd be wise to not make assumptions or pull my pots.

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Fullbush - how do you justify pulling someone else's pots simply because they use poly line? Do you also pull all pots (bouys) that don't have proper identification on them?

  5. #5
    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    Looks to me like he was refering to those pots with poly line floating on the surface witch is a violation. I seriously doubt he would check everyones pots for poly line and pull any of them.
    Of course I would also not make the assumption that all those shrimpers who use poly line leave any of it floating on the surface.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

    "Fishing and Hunting are only an addiction if you're trying to quit"

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    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kasilofchrisn View Post
    Looks to me like he was refering to those pots with poly line floating on the surface witch is a violation. I seriously doubt he would check everyones pots for poly line and pull any of them.
    Of course I would also not make the assumption that all those shrimpers who use poly line leave any of it floating on the surface.
    Bingo! thanx kasilofchrisn
    skydiver obviously I wouldn't pull your pots because of the weights holding the line from floating...
    Folks what I'm talking about is clearly a floating line navigation hazard so calm down. People do navigate at night and floating line can be a dangerous hazard. so don't get your boxers in a bunch, because I will pull and dispatch of any navigation hazards I see

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    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    Skydiver, that is an excellent post, Thanks for being real

    Mistakes like that are not all that hard to make and I think a lot of guys who only set gear now and then may be able to really learn from this Thread, "Think it all through, really doublecheck your buoyline, even to the point of taking a look after it is set and settling on to the bottom to make sure you have everything right.

    Even things like a relatively small rats nest of buoyline can result in similar to your situation if someone is "Just Sqeaking" by on buoyline. I have been setting buoyline for deep gear for years and by habit I still try to take a run by to make sure it's floating "Hi and Dry" before leaving it to soak.

    Kinda amazing what those buoys will float, eh? AND if you hadn't checked back on it, it would have drifted AWAY AWAY AWAY

    Curious, do you use an anchor also or is it just the weight of the pots tacking it to the bottom?
    If setting to hit an exact spot, even a small anchor will help to "Pin It" where you drop it versus the weight of pots that also have web or mesh drag on the way down, cause 'em to drift a bit more.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    And you thought you could hide behind your keyboard!!!

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    Skydiver, that is an excellent post, Thanks for being real

    Mistakes like that are not all that hard to make and I think a lot of guys who only set gear now and then may be able to really learn from this Thread, "Think it all through, really doublecheck your buoyline, even to the point of taking a look after it is set and settling on to the bottom to make sure you have everything right.

    Even things like a relatively small rats nest of buoyline can result in similar to your situation if someone is "Just Sqeaking" by on buoyline. I have been setting buoyline for deep gear for years and by habit I still try to take a run by to make sure it's floating "Hi and Dry" before leaving it to soak.

    Kinda amazing what those buoys will float, eh? AND if you hadn't checked back on it, it would have drifted AWAY AWAY AWAY

    Curious, do you use an anchor also or is it just the weight of the pots tacking it to the bottom?
    If setting to hit an exact spot, even a small anchor will help to "Pin It" where you drop it versus the weight of pots that also have web or mesh drag on the way down, cause 'em to drift a bit more.
    I don't have any weight in the pots, I just have a mushroom anchor on the end of the line. One thing I've thought about is if there is a strong current or wind and pots aren't weighted (only the anchor at the end like I have), then can the line get pulled tight enough by the buoy to lift one or more pots off the bottom?

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    Member Frostbitten's Avatar
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    Fullbush - I completely understand that floating poly is a nav hazard...which is why I rarely, if ever go anywhere near bouys other than my own. If I did happen across the situation, instead of pulling the gear, I would probably just attach a weight to the line and move along. Hazard averted, time saved and I don't have to explain to anyone why I have someone elses gear on my boat.

  11. #11
    Member kodiakrain's Avatar
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    I think that is possible skydiver, if nothing else the buoy surge may be just lifting that first pot enough that it is stirring around and may affect the way it fishes. Might just throw an anchor or cannon ball on the buoyline side also if that makes sense,(if I understand the way you have it)
    Although little things like those weights you have to keep the poly buoyline down also help to minimize surge somewhat.

    Also you mention an A-1 which if I recall is just smooth round, right? The Low Drag buoys, LD-2 (I think), the ones with those rib lines around them are designed with the intention of laying on the top of current and wave action to minimize the pull on the line below. Also if you pull up to an LDrag after setting and it is bobbing or tipping up you know you need more buoyline, if laying on it's side even in current it is a great buoy.

    Try just hauling a round one in fast by hand sometime (like the last twenty fathoms of it, or while the boat is idling away from it as you haul) then try same with a Low Drag buoy, you'll instantly see what those ribs do. Might help with your set-up, they are spendy but I don't use the big rounds ones much unless I am in MAJOR CURRENT and worried they might literally be pulled down. Then a better option is to use a Hard Ball, Trawling Floats found on beaches everywhere open to the Gulf.

    I don't know but I don't imagine you have that much current going on in there or even storm surge (locals could comment better on that) to warrant that but the Low Drag buoys are nicer for storage reasons, also, etc.
    Ten Hours in that little raft off the AK peninsula, blowin' NW 60, in November.... "the Power of Life and Death is in the Tongue," and Yes, God is Good !

  12. #12
    Member fullbush's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frostbitten View Post
    Fullbush - I completely understand that floating poly is a nav hazard...which is why I rarely, if ever go anywhere near bouys other than my own. If I did happen across the situation, instead of pulling the gear, I would probably just attach a weight to the line and move along. Hazard averted, time saved and I don't have to explain to anyone why I have someone elses gear on my boat.
    yep probably a better policy frostbitten. I have sucked poly in one of my jets killing one of my engines. fortunately there was no damage except bloody knuckles cutting it out, so I'm a little sensitive on the issue

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    Quote Originally Posted by kodiakrain View Post
    I think that is possible skydiver, if nothing else the buoy surge may be just lifting that first pot enough that it is stirring around and may affect the way it fishes. Might just throw an anchor or cannon ball on the buoyline side also if that makes sense,(if I understand the way you have it)
    Although little things like those weights you have to keep the poly buoyline down also help to minimize surge somewhat.

    Also you mention an A-1 which if I recall is just smooth round, right? The Low Drag buoys, LD-2 (I think), the ones with those rib lines around them are designed with the intention of laying on the top of current and wave action to minimize the pull on the line below. Also if you pull up to an LDrag after setting and it is bobbing or tipping up you know you need more buoyline, if laying on it's side even in current it is a great buoy.

    Try just hauling a round one in fast by hand sometime (like the last twenty fathoms of it, or while the boat is idling away from it as you haul) then try same with a Low Drag buoy, you'll instantly see what those ribs do. Might help with your set-up, they are spendy but I don't use the big rounds ones much unless I am in MAJOR CURRENT and worried they might literally be pulled down. Then a better option is to use a Hard Ball, Trawling Floats found on beaches everywhere open to the Gulf.

    I don't know but I don't imagine you have that much current going on in there or even storm surge (locals could comment better on that) to warrant that but the Low Drag buoys are nicer for storage reasons, also, etc.
    Just wrap some trawl web around a buoy ball (like a bait bag) and it will slide across the water just like one of those low drag buoys. Its a old swordfish longliner trick.

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