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Thread: rafting dt's

  1. #1
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Default rafting dt's

    I'm not going rafting this week and I'm a little worried about dt's. Any suggestions? Ativan or something?

    We bought our raft April 22nd and I figure I've hit the water 17 times, just tryin' to get my money's worth.
    Mat a couple of weeks ago with some boy scouts:

    Gulkana last week. 5 year old photographer shooting pictures of his dad being goofy in the canyon:


    It's gonna be a rough week. A bunch of time at work and the sea life center in seward on my day off.
    Hopefully next week will be better.

  2. #2
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    Hey Scott,

    Sounds like you are havin' some good times out there...

    Just a heads up ----- Second pic is showing that your oars are mounted the wrong way...

    Cuff goes facing downstream & then flop the oar shaft over to the other side of the pin --- this way the oar shaft is also on the downstream/forward facing side while the clip engages from front side as well.

    All this adds to more power, better efficiency, faster recovery, greater safety, w/ much less wear & tear on the oar system.

    Good pic of high-water on Gulkana!

    Cheers!

  3. #3
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Rafting DT's, withdrawal symptoms, can be avoided by going fishing, hunting, or power boating...

  4. #4
    Member Heg's Avatar
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    Scott,

    Way to get after it this summer-it looks like you are already putting together a nice river resume. I think all of us that are really tuned into this lifestyle have a hard time getting it off of our minds when were not on the water. The only time I let my mind drift from the river is during the winter when I obsess over skiing. During the summer months, my wife jokes that I’m a raftaholic: reading rafting books, surfing the Internet, tinkering in the garage with my gear, trying to convince her and other buddies to go on trips, etc. So, here is my list to that helps with my rafting dts:

    1.) Research river beer: Sample as many different canned beers as you can (for obvious reasons bottle beer is no good on an inflatable). I prefer Heinken, but the younger generation has me sucking down PBRs on occasion. There are also a lot of microbrews starting to show up in cans.
    2.) Surf the Internet: Check out this forum as well as others. Google rivers you want to run. Watch YouTube videos; you can learn a lot from other’s adventures… and carnage.
    3.) Practice your knots: Get a couple pieces of rope and practice. You probably won’t need most of these knots, but you look cool if you can tie them. Here is a good website: http://www.animatedknots.com/indexre...matedknots.com
    4.) Pay attention to the flow of your favorite rivers: Check out the gauges and watch how they change with the weather. I have direct links to Eagle River, Willow, Matanuska, 6 Mile and others on my iPhone.
    5.) Scope rapids: If you don’t have time to actually go boating, drive out and look at Eagle River, or 6 Mile if your heading down that way. Visualize yourself in the rapid. Pay attention to high and low water. Hopefully others will be floating and you can get a look at the lines
    6.) Read: Check out all the Alaska river guidebooks by Jettmar, Embrick, Strahan, and Johnson. Flag rivers you want to do. Read. Read. Read. There are lots of rafting books you can enjoy with canned beer.
    7.) Play with you gear: Make sure you understand how all of your gear works. Do you have the ability to repair gear if it’s broken? Could you simplify your kitchen? Etc.
    8.) Pay attention: There is a lot you can learn from people with more experience than you, but I also learn a lot from others that may be green to rafting- cooking ideas, technology, first aide, camping, fishing, etc.- you may learn something that makes your next trip way more enjoyable.
    9.) Cook: Probably the best thing you can do with your canned beer. If you don’t have one, buy a dutch oven. Practice cooking with it. You can make all kinds of cool stuff. Also, get a dehydrator and mess around with it. Work on grilling food. Eating is one of my favorite things to do on a raft trip.
    10.) Exercise: Not to hyperbolize, but being fit can be the difference between life and death. Stay strong in the upper body-it will make a big difference as you are rowing for extended periods, hauling gear, or pulling yourself on top of your raft when she flips. Also, work on your cardio- having strong lungs during strenuous portages is very beneficial and is crucial to the all around fatigue that comes from a long day on/in the water.
    11.) Gin and tonic: Drink sapphire and tonic with a lime. These are extremely refreshing on a river trip, especially, if you are not into canned beer.

    * Sorry if I offended any nondrinkers out there. I suppose you could drink coffee instead. And, remember to not pop one open until the boats are tied down for the night.

    Josh

  5. #5
    Member scott_rn's Avatar
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    Stellar advice everyone. I guess the sea life center will be fun too.

    Heg, Brian - I guess I need to read. Thanks for the heads up on the oars being backward on the pins.

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