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Thread: Waterfowl advice for the FBKS area

  1. #1
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    Default Waterfowl advice for the FBKS area

    Ive never hunted ducks myself, been out with a couple buddies before in the mintoflats area but was just along for the pike. I have now got an itch to expand my hunting horizon and try my hand at it. Any advice from what shot and choke( i assume a full choke) to areas that are productive would be helpful. Background info- I do have 10 years experience hunting upland birds and wingshooting, I have no dog, and I have never messed around with calling ducks. Thank you in advance for any advice given.

  2. #2

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    I feel obligated to mention this before you go diving in. You are going to be addicted! For me, there is nothing like hunting ducks. Its a social hunt where you can sit back...enjoy your coffee until the birds come in then you'll be in such a rush you'll spill it all over yourself...trust me, I've done it countless times. The birds always seem to know when you're not paying attention because that is when they come in.

    Shot: I like shooting #4's. I'd rather take more pellets in the sky because I need the extra help. Some folks will say #4's aren't heavy enough because of their thick feathers but with puddle ducks I've never had a problem. Some also like to go to a heavier shot later in the season when the birds start to pack on extra feathers but up here the season really isn't that long due to ice forming.

    Choke: either a modified or improved...go with the one you can shoot better and know your distance. It sounds like you do since you've been chasing upland for a number of years. I'd stay away from a full because most of your shots aren't going to be that far away (or shouldn't be) and you'll also probably want to eat the bird so for me there is a better option.

    no dog: really isn't that big of a deal. Does it help, youbetcha but it can be done without a dog. I've seen everything from a small boat, to a fishing rod to just going for a swim to retrieve the birds.

    calling ducks: go get a call and leave it in your truck and practice while on the road. Also, practice outside because it'll sound completely different. Get on youtube and log in some keyboard time and you'll get some good instruction. Another route is to get a dvd.

    decoys: If I were you I'd recommend using hen decoys. There isn't a bird flying in early September that is colored up so I'd use brown decoys and that'll look a lot more realistic. You can also google how to set up a spread. Long story short....have a pocket for the birds to land in. One set on the left and one set up on the right with a space in the middle. Also learn how to set up a spread considering the wind.

    Oh, and try not to setup facing to the east...you won't see the birds coming. I hope this helps.

    Richie

  3. #3
    Member akblackdawg's Avatar
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    I hear that in the FBks area you get some very good shooting just across the river from North Pole, you will need a shallow draft boat to get back to them. Good luck and enjoy. Bud

  4. #4
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    Thanks for the info and hopefully between moose hunting,work, and of course taking the kids grouse hunting I will find some time to shoot some ducks.

  5. #5
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
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    Good advice Richie....as for the hen dekes, I haven't been able to find anyone to sell just hens. I use black duck dekes and have had good success. Although you'll have to order them because no one up here carries them.
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  6. #6

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    avery products carries all hen decoy sets in mallard and teal they call them early season packages and you can find them on Mack's Prairie wings and cabelas

  7. #7

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    While I agree with much of what has been said here the hunting without a dog is not one that I would agree with. Unless you're planning to hunt on a parking lot there is no way that you will be able to recover all of the birds that are wounded by just looking for them. A dog has one very important advantage over us-they can smell them out-even when the duck heads to the bottom of a pond and hides out there. I can't tell you how many ducks my labs or goldens have found that I would have had to spend the entire day looking for. While I don't have any qualms about killing my limit, I really hate to leave a wounded bird in the field. Without a dog that is a lot more likely to occur. I can count on one hand the number of birds I've knocked down and my dog couldn't find. On a personal level, for me the real joy of duck hunting is not shooting ducks or even seeing them come back in for a third time to land in our decoys-the real joy is watching my labs eyes as she watches a flock coming in and the pure joy that she gets when I release her to retrieve. It takes about a year of solid training but it's well worth the effort.
    Ruby at the end of a good day.

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