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Thread: PLUMBING Roof VENTS for a simple cabin.......Is one vent enough.....?

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    Question PLUMBING Roof VENTS for a simple cabin.......Is one vent enough.....?

    What is the minimum amount of roof vents needed for a minimal cabin ? After the last ten years of hauling creek water and outhouse use, I hope to have some basic plumbing by this winter. So cabin will have one (1) toilet, one (1) shower, and two (2) sinks. The sinks will be back-to-back, and kitchen and bathroom will share a common plumbing wall. The Question: Can I get by with only "ONE" (1) Roof Vent for everything.......? And should the Vent be as straight above the toilet as possible.....? Thank you for the help.

  2. #2

    Default Ooooops

    Ooops.....one more question: should vent be 3"

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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Before all the plumbers chime in... I vent my entire house, two complete bathrooms, a washing machine, dishwasher and a kitchen on a single verticle 3" vent. It is more than enough and I've never had a single issue with it.

    Mine happens to stack straight up from the toilets and everything else branches into it.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Thanks AKDoug, I have a new question........does the vent need to go through the roof, or can it just go up into the trusses, as there is a vent on both ends..........?

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    Member mjm316's Avatar
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    Every fixture needs to be vented. They can all tie into say your main toiliet vent which yes shall be 3 inch And it does HAVE to go through the roof. PM for any other questions
    Tomorrow isn't promised. "Never delay kissing a pretty girl or opening a bottle of whiskey." E. Hemingway

  6. #6

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    If you have a metal roof the closer to the peak that you can bring your vent through the roof the less chance for a snow load to rip it out. If you had space in the attic you could use different angle fittings and get it closer to the peak.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    All good advice here but I must add don't vent anything into the attic, ever! That introduces worm moist air into a cold space that then condenses into water or ice which makes a heck of a mess of things up there. Just last summer I put a new roof on a house built in 1996 (trusses sheathing and all) because the bathroom vent fan duct fell off unnoticed at some point causing everything to rot to the point of near collapse.

    Also make sure not to have any belles in the vent that could hold water.
    Andy
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    I have often wondered how the vent works in the winter, if it is full of ice crystals, hors-frost, and covered with 8 feet of heavy wet snow.

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    Sponsor ADfields's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AGL4now View Post
    I have often wondered how the vent works in the winter, if it is full of ice crystals, hors-frost, and covered with 8 feet of heavy wet snow.
    For some reason they donít seem to ice up inside in this area, Palmer, warmth from the pipes in the house maybe? Mine got choked off with snow once and would suck all the water from the toilet bowl when flushed. I was fresh from Arizona at the time so it took me a bit to figure out what was up with the thing. I extended the pipe to 3í above the roofline and it has been fine for 9 years now like that.
    Andy
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    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    They do get clogged at times. However, it's pretty rare for a 3" to get enough frost in it to render it useless. I get the question all the time in my store..."why is my toilet (or sink) draining slowly?) A whole bunch of times it's a clogged vent, and most of the time it's 2". Covered in snow doesn't seem to be an issue. They seem to suck air through the snow just fine.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Even in the dead of winter, with 3' of snow over the vents, there is a melted spot where the warm air from the vents has melted the snow above it or the snow has fallen in the vent and melted...at least at my house...

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