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Thread: Wool or fleece vest?

  1. #1
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    Default Wool or fleece vest?

    I really like wearing vests when layering. For a tundra caribou hunt would you prefer one made of light wool or fleece (probably Polartec). Will have a Berber fleece jacket with Cabelas Microtex shirt and long underwear underneath (not sure of the kind yet). Thanks.

  2. #2
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
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    Default Polartec Fleece for Me!!!!

    I love the stuff have some wool also. The wool is just so much heavier. The fleecee is lite and drys fast. Wool dries not so fast. But will keep you some what warm while wet.

    Steve

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    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Fleece

    Dry's quick and with the windshear added I think it is warmer than wool..
    I am atimate about windblock and windproof upper clothing especially on a caribou hunt.

  4. #4

    Default Fleece

    No doubt about Fleece is the way too go. Dries faster and will break the wind great.. Have many hours of field testing both.. FLEECE

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    Member tccak71's Avatar
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    Question Fleece Vest

    mtcop71/wilson:
    Any particular vest you recommend? I like fleece, but I surely don't have a windblocking/resistant fleece vest.

    Tim

  6. #6

    Default Vest Suggestion

    I have the Whitewater Wind Blocker Vest I purchased from Cabelas. I could find the link on Cabelas web site but here is the one I found. I believe I payed under $50, I do not go too the field with out. Hope this helps.



    http://whitewateroutdoors.com/osc/pr...804c68af0cab03

  7. #7
    New member mtcop71's Avatar
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    Default Cabelas

    Cabelas sells the Berber fleece in windsheer as well. I would leave the vest and go with a full pullover, Sitting and glassing all day with a 25mph headwind at that time of year will even make your face cold.. That being said take a balaclava as well.

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    Default

    I was actually planning on both the vest and the Berber fleece windstopper vest. I have found that many times and additional garment on my torso really makes me comfortable on cold windy days without restricting movement too much.

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    Member fullkurl's Avatar
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    Thumbs up

    Quote Originally Posted by mtcop71 View Post
    Cabelas sells the Berber fleece in windsheer as well. I would leave the vest and go with a full pullover, Sitting and glassing all day with a 25mph headwind at that time of year will even make your face cold.. That being said take a balaclava as well.

    Good advice.

    A thick fleece pullover with drawstring hoodie is the only "coat" I take in the sheep mountains. Its amazing how warm and dry it is, especially with a marmot precip jacket over the top in really gusty or wet times.

    If its warm by midday, I tie it around my waist.


    Wool had its day, but fleece may be the best product ever designed for outdoorsmen.

  10. #10

    Default Primaloft

    Bowman,

    I spend 200+ days a year hiking, snowshoeing, skiing, and just being in the mountains here in AK. I used to swear by my fleece vests until I bought an REI vest with Primaloft insulation a year and a half ago. Since then I don't think I have worn a fleece vest except to go out to dinner. Primaloft is warmer than fleece, amazingly light weight and much more packable. The arm holes offer a snug fit which helps keep snow and crud from falling in. This is the one piece of equipment that I never leave behind!

    REI has a great sale on these right now...half off! http://www.rei.com/product/738387

  11. #11
    Member Rod in Wasilla's Avatar
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    Default

    Wool is a great natural insulator. That being said, wind blocking polar fleece is THE way to go. It is lighter and dries faster than wool. All my hunting clothes are now synthetics. But, I do have one caveat. All polar fleece and other synthetics (nylon, polyester, etc...) are essentially plastics. Plastic and fire do not play well together. Be very careful when wearing fleece around the campfire.

    Now, unless you're going to spend all your time tending the campfire, go buy some wind blocking polar fleece and join us in the 21st century! ;-)
    Quote Originally Posted by northwestalska
    ... you canít tell stories about the adventures you wished you had done!

  12. #12

    Default Berber Pullover W/wind Shear Or Windstopper!

    I have prolly just shy of $1 million dollars in coats and clothes. the windstopper berber is amazingly quiet, warm, it breathes VERY well, I prefer it to anything in cold weather, even if it is snowing heavy. the vests that I have tend to sit at home compared to my berber pullover, I have an older on with Gore Windstopper and a newer windshear coat, but the pullover is my preference as it does not let anything in through the zipper.......best $80 ever spent!

  13. #13
    Member Wyatt's Avatar
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    Default

    I put my vote in for Primaloft for hunting! Down gets a bad rap! In very cold dry weather it's still king for its warmth to weight and compactability, but it loses nearly all its insulation value when wet. Wools great since most have it laying around the house or can pick it up cheap at second hand stores. It insulates some when wet, but is heavy and takes a long time to dry. So that leaves synthetics! Fleece wicks moisture well, insulates when wet and dries quickly! I like it for bumming around town, but out hunting it is relatively heavy, doesn't compact well in the backpack, is bulky to wear, loses about 50% of its insulation value when wet, and unless it has a "Windstopper" type liner, body heat loss is substantial when the wind blows. All the downsides of fleece are where Primaloft shines. It packs small, insulates nearly 100% when wet, is warmer per ounce compared to fleece and always has some type of lightweight windproof liner. This liner also makes it water resistent compared to fleece. A Primaloft jacket compares to 2 to 3 layers of Polartec 200 in warmth. It is more expenses and maybe not as durable as the other materials listed, but it just feels better on the body in my opinion! I'm not a fan of vests, but that is more a personal preference!

    Info on Primaloft:

    http://www.integraldesigns.com/ipage...primaloftsport

    Wyatt

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    Default Primaloft all the way

    Nearly all the insulative qualities of wool, even when wet. It wicks moisture away from the body, and is extremely compressible. And it's usually significantly cheaper than 700/800 fill down.

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    Wink A vote for fleece.

    A windshear fleece pullover is the way to go. A fleece vest with a high collar, underneath this is part of a good layering system. If i'm packin in thats what I'll take these days. Bill.
    ; for them that honour me I will honour, and they that despise me shall be lightly esteemed. 1 SAMUEL 2;30

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    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Fleece is winning...

    Although I like merino in base layers, the wool outerwear I have is bulky and heavy. It looks good - I like that, and it won't melt in a fire I guess, but the lightweight, quick-drying, easy compressiblity of fleece, especially a garment with a hood as Fullkurl mentions... lots of function per ounce.

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    Default

    No dispute with any other opinions, but I steer away from windshear products after trying them as I seem to create a lot of heat and moisture when I'm active. I found that a windshear layer under goretex raingear is too sweaty. If I am backpacking I will pack the least number of garments possible so I use the raingear layer for wind protection. I do take a vest sometimes but I'm more likely to take a hooded fleece jacket for versatility. Lots of personal variations, luckily for the garment industry!

    Merino makes for wonderful underwear.

  18. #18
    Member stevelyn's Avatar
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    I like fleece for inner layers with wool as the outer.
    Now what ?

  19. #19

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    Wool is no doubt heavier, but it has won me over the past two years. Last year while floating for moose I hopped out of the raft to stop it from slamming into a strainer, lost my footing, and my entire right side of my body went under. Regained my footing, pulled the raft as needed, and boarded the raft. It was a couple of hours before I pulled ashore and changed into another set of dry wool. The wool pants and shirt I was wearing were thoroughly soaked, but the wool did in fact retain my body heat well.

    A couple of lesser known advantages of quality wool, besides retaining body heat while wet, is that it doesn't burn very well, and it does not pick up body odors quickly. My wife and I both wear wool on our moose hunts, and we're always pleasantly suprised that the wool doesn't smell nearly as bad as it should after a 10 day float hunt. We of course smell like $#!^.

    I've got a Sleeping Indian wool vest, and I adore it. Its thick as a horse blanket, and some would say it weighs as much as the horse.

    WhiteFish

  20. #20
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    While wool doesn't melt like synthetics it will burn albeit fairly slowly. Of greater interest is the toxic gas released when it burns. Unlikely to be an issue around the campfire though.

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