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Thread: 2 VHF radios 1 antenna

  1. #1
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Default 2 VHF radios 1 antenna

    Is it possible to connect 2 vhf radios to a single antenna? If so, is there some kind of splitter you have to buy?

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    Member SkinnyRaven's Avatar
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  3. #3
    Member hoose35's Avatar
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    Thank you very much

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    Member Mort's Avatar
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    I'm no electronics expert, but I think this could actually damage your radio(s). If you transmit on one, and the signal is transmitted directly to another cable, without going out one antenna and back in the other (as in boat to boat), I think the signal strength could be so high as to damage the receiving radio. If you only turned one on at a time, you would probably be OK. I'd run this by someone really smart on radios before I tried it.

  5. #5

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  6. #6
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    As a ham radio operator, we combine radios that operate on different frequency ranges to one antenna using the appropriate splitter / duplexer all the time. If the radios are on the same frequency range, only one radio can be on at a time, otherwise you have a high probability to burn up one of the radios (without fail) if you are not running the duplexer setup (as done on repeaters).

    The above linked product will allow you to connect two antenna's to one radio, it is not designed or appropriate to utilize for connecting two radios to one radio. You need a duplexer such as found on page 6 of the attached PDF.
    Attached Files Attached Files

  7. #7

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    Just curious, but what advantages are there to having more than one antenna per radio?

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by skydiver View Post
    Just curious, but what advantages are there to having more than one antenna per radio?
    Typically one antenna has a set amount of gain, if you stack (properly position) your antenna's you can & will get a better signal gain overall. This helps with reception and transmission capabilities. Typically Ham's will stack a Yagi (directional) antenna system to obtain a high gain system.

    Other reasons to have more than one antenna per radio is if the radio can operate on multiple frequency ranges, look at a Ham HF receiver, typically there are two antenna ports on the back for different antenna frequency ranges. The Alinco DX-70th has one antenna connection for the HF band (160 meter to 10 meter) and another for 6 meters. You can use a duplexer as mentioned above to combine both of those connections into one antenna line should you be using a multi-band antenna (G5RV, outbacker, etc...). This is not typically the case on VHF radios, but has been known to exist on some models.

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