Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 51

Thread: Floating down the Ivishak River in early September

  1. #1
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default Floating down the Ivishak River in early September

    Can anyone offer some advice? I will be doing a C'bou hunting trip floating down the Ivishak River. (Airboat will take us up/down river & drop us). Could you make some suggestions on the following: clothing to take & how much, mosqito protection, light weight breathable chest waders vs hip waders? What type day pack/back pack would you recommend & do I need a rain suit besides the waders and rain jacket? All suggestions are appreciated. I am limited to 100 lbs total including my 306 plus sidearm. Thank you for your kind help.

  2. #2

    Default

    There is a lot of information on this topic so I'd suggest using the search function.

    Clothing: you'll need a good base layer then wear loose layers on top of that. This way you'll have the option to shed layers if you get too hot. If your limit is 100lbs then I'd pack some extra clothes because snow is very possible in September and even if it doesn't snow it can be windy and in the single digits. The weather tends to have a mind of its own.

    I'd go with chest waders (light breathable).

    Pack: use a pack that your comfortable with that can carry a load. I'd recommend going on some walks with 70lbs or so you can get familiar with the pack and how it carries weight.

    Yes, pack an extra rain suit. You could always slip in over your waders and get everything wet.

    bring a compass. I know you're floating down river however you could spot a nice caribou off the river then make a stalk and by the time you're done butchering the fog could roll in. Its easy to get disoriented with limited visibility. Also bring a mirror.

    First aid kit: bring a good one and know whats in it and how to use it. Nothing worse than having the supplies but not knowing how to use them in a situation.

    This should get the wheels turning.

    Hope this helps,

    Richie

    Mosquitos: if the weather is cool then you shouldn't have to worry about the bugs but I'd still take some bug dope and a head net.

  3. #3
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Expect the unexpected, the weather in Alaska is unpredictable, the Brooks range is no exception. Heed the warning about the ice fog, it will roll in quick and stay for hours.

    Dress in layers, it will most likely be right at or below freezing in the morning and can warm up into the 70s or in can turn crazy cold. I always try to have clothes for down to 20 degrees or so for that time of year.

    Bring some fishing gear the fishing is great. The river is fast and cold, and has killed more than a few folks. Hard to cross fast moving water so be careful.

    Plan on bugs and be ready for them.

    I don't use a day pack, you will be hunting wide open ground and will be doing alot of walking. Bring a good pack that will haul 70 or more pounds without breaking and falling apart on you. I keep all my gear with me and with the pack can get one load back to camp quick. I always keep the gear I would need to clean my game, take photos, and spend the night if the need should arise.

    IMHO leave the hand cannon home. I have never had a need for one on a hunt and most people that have brought them along soon get tired of carrying them around and leave them at camp. The only time I pack a handgun is when I'm fishing, on hunts I have my rifle and keep it with me.

    Know the rules and obey them, that area is highly enforced and you will most likely be checked. Salvage all meat, don't want any trouble on a great hunt.

    Keep a clean camp there are lots of bears in that area. Not a bad idea to have a wolf tag, seen a few as well.

    Watch the river it drops fast that time of year and you can end up doing alot of dragging, if you are floating back make sure you know which braid to take for the takeout.

    Do some practice walks in your hunting gear, walk in your hunting boots as much as you can, more times than I can count I have had hunters not used to walking or with new boots blister up their feet on the first or second day and they are done hunting, your feet are your only transportation take care of them.

    Here is a link to a hunt I did up that way.
    http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...rip?highlight=

    This fall will find me back in the Brooks Range as well and I can't wait. Beautiful country.

    Steve

  4. #4
    Member
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    fairbanks, ak
    Posts
    495

    Default

    My experience up there Ive never had bug issues after the middle of august. It doesnt hurt to take dope though. Plan on it being cold... you can always take layers off if you have them. If you dont have them its hard to put them on. Dont overlook your lifejacket. Mine saved my bacon 3 times on a single hunt last year. I wear chest waders and love them. Rain gear doubles as a windbreaker as well plus the jacket will keep your top dry while on the river... take them. Bou are heavy make sure your pack will handle one. Make sure you can handle it too. The tundra is no joke walking on. It looks flat but its not. Lots of mud and water to get you wet.

  5. #5

    Default

    ice fog, heck come sept expect 70 degrees one day and snow the next...ice fog that can last for days, or weeks.

    I prefered hippers on the 2 floats we did here. The river rises and falls extremely fast, and it's usually pretty easy in the upper portions to get acrossed if you really need too. I hate hiking in chest waders unless I'm fishing, going fishing, or returning from fishing lol.

    We've seen snow aug 7th on this river that lasted 4 days, the following day was HOT! and BUG centeral!

    oops sorry stid, didnt mean to double post your info lol, thats what I get for reading first .

    I definatly would bring a rod!!! the char fishing is snaztastic!!!, or atleast was not so long ago before it really became popular.

  6. #6
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Steve,

    Thanks for the info. I look forward to reading about you & your wifes trip. I may have a number of other questions. Do you mind if I communicate with you? Andy

  7. #7
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by andycoats View Post
    Steve,

    Thanks for the info. I look forward to reading about you & your wifes trip. I may have a number of other questions. Do you mind if I communicate with you? Andy
    Feel feel to contact me, I will be hunting with a friend this year. The wife is off the serve overseas.
    Hope you have a great hunt.

    Steve

  8. #8
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I may have responded to your comments about fishing but just learning how to use this forum. I really appraciate all the advice. I was thinking of taking an orvis travel rod that will break down and Bradia spin caster. What kind of baits?

    Keeping a clean camp helps keeps the bears away but are there other precautions any of you would suggest just in case the folks I am going with don't have all the answers related to bears coming to the camp sites at night, while we are sleeping :-)?

    I have a set of breathable chest waders that I can roll down into pants with the boots you wear over the neoprene footies. I was opting for these because they are light weight but durable. Comments?

    I wouild like to continue to learn so if you guys don't mind I may have additional questions. I hunt a lot in Alabama but that is "nursery school" compared to this.

    Looking forward to these answers and any other comments.

    Thanks,

    Andy

  9. #9
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    THanks Steve. I have some customers in North Pole. North Pole Fire Department and Flint Hill Resources.

    What kind of rife did you use?

    Andy

  10. #10
    Moderator stid2677's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Fairbanks Area
    Posts
    7,274

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by andycoats View Post
    I may have responded to your comments about fishing but just learning how to use this forum. I really appraciate all the advice. I was thinking of taking an orvis travel rod that will break down and Bradia spin caster. What kind of baits?

    Keeping a clean camp helps keeps the bears away but are there other precautions any of you would suggest just in case the folks I am going with don't have all the answers related to bears coming to the camp sites at night, while we are sleeping :-)?

    I have a set of breathable chest waders that I can roll down into pants with the boots you wear over the neoprene footies. I was opting for these because they are light weight but durable. Comments?

    I wouild like to continue to learn so if you guys don't mind I may have additional questions. I hunt a lot in Alabama but that is "nursery school" compared to this.

    Looking forward to these answers and any other comments.

    Thanks,

    Andy
    I would plan on gear in the 20lb class. These are strong ocean run fish, in a very swift river. Vibrex spinners or spoons bass sized. Mepps spinners with buck tail.

    I can not stress enough how much you should respect this river. I have mobility issues and only weight 160lbs so my personal limit for swift water crossing is just over knee deep, any deeper and I could get swept off my feet. I have hunted alot in my knee high muck boots, your waders sound like they will work. Not unusual to walk for miles, can you do it in them???

    One other tip is to keep your wader shoes in the tent on cold nights, frozen wader shoes are not fun. Ask me how I know???

    People worry way too much about bears, keep all food and game meat or bloody clothes away from your sleep tent. Know how to care for your meat in the field and keep your meat cache downwind and well away from your sleep tent. It can rain or snow for days. Nice to have a tarp for a cook tent. No matter how bad the temptation keep food and food smells out of your sleep tent. I don't think any self respecting bear would prefer stinky hunters over fresh caribou. If bears are that great a concern buy a bear fence worth the price for peace of mind. The bears in that area are hunted so most will stay clear, it is the young ones that cause most the trouble, no different than human teenagers.

    Hunt hard and be safe.

    Steve

  11. #11
    New member
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Chugiak, AK
    Posts
    694

    Default

    Why does everyone was important weight on a side arm, when you have a rifle with you.


    Terry

  12. #12

    Default

    dunno, my sharp sticks work just fine lol

  13. #13
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    I'm a novice. Just trying to get info and I appreciate your comments. I am here to "learn" and you guys are the experts. Thanks, Andy

  14. #14
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    What caliber rifle do you recommend? I have a 306 or should I bring my "Daisy Red Dot BB Gun"? Seriously, is a 306 adequate?

  15. #15

    Default

    I guess the question you should ask yourself is..."is this the gun I'd place my life, or my partners life on if a grizzly decides to get you".

    Caribou themselves are not very large in most cases, thin skin animals. Go to adak, well you can throw that not very large comment out the window LOL!

  16. #16
    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    Paradise (Alaska)
    Posts
    1,543

    Default

    andycoats,
    Your .306 will be fine.
    Caribou die easy if hit anywhere in the vitals. Many have had the air let out of them with lesser calibers, such as a .243.
    Ivishak caribou are not hugh bodied animals. I generally get little more than 100 pounds of de-boned meat, which is considerabally less than when the old Mulchatna herd was huntable. Racks are of interesting shapes, generally not hugh, but three years ago one of my guys shot a very beautiful 399 gross!
    Great hunt, fun river, expect to see other hunters...the Ivishak holds very few secrets anymore....but I'll return there...

    DO YOU HAVE YOUR AIR SUPPORT ARRANGED/ESTABLISHED??
    Mike McCrary out of Happy Valley can be reached at 907 209-0119 for reliable, safe and experienced transportation.

    Dennis

  17. #17
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thank you Dennis for your helpful input. My first hunting trip to Alaska and hopefully not my last. Andy

  18. #18

    Default

    Andy,

    Guess what I was trying to say that wasnt as eloquently put as others....is most of us when we carry rifles are concerned caliber wise to the big furry things more so then having enough gun for animal at hand. It's pretty rare that a rifle that can nock down a charging hairball with fangs and teeth wont do the job on a moose or caribou.

    Sure a 243 or heck my 22-250 will kill caribou all day long. I dont want to be caught walking around with a 22-250 should a bear charge, it's not a fun experience.

    It' seems atleast from my 'limited' gun toting experience, that most around here carry 300's 338's, not that a 270 wont kill a moose deader then a road killed skunk, it's not quite the weapon of choice when it comes to charging bears. Confidence in your weapon of choice is huge...over confidence can be deadly.

    We were bluffed on the ivishak at 20 yards (when he STARTED the bluff). My 7mm sure felt like a pellet gun at that point, thankfully we didnt have to shoot the bear. My partner got some GREAT still photo's of him. We had JUST landed, the raft was blown up and we were loading gear getting ready to float.

    I've also seen them go a helluva long ways after being hit HARD with 300's and 338's, including my brownie with no lungs and a busted shoulder, managed to make it up the side of a southeast alaska mt with easy a couple hundred yards!

    Just to note, I dont carry a pistol, I rarely hunt with guns, and I love giving pistol wears as much of a hard time as I get for carry bear spray, just a little good natured ribbing anyways .

    I dont think you can put too much emphasis on it Stid, it's rare I disagree with you, but I definatly will on this one! A close fishing buddy of mine had an article written about an experience he had in illiamna of a bear ripping the side of the tent, he sat up just in time for the bear to steal his dirty cloths bag. He knows the ins and outs to camping in bear country.

    Wish ya the best.

  19. #19
    Member danattherock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    5,608

    Default

    Be sure to take your fishing rod. Great dolly fishing in that river at times and if I recall, you will get dropped off near a good spot. Any deeper pools would be where to fish. Ask the guy running you up. If you spin fish, take some 3/8 ounce spinners in gold, silver, etc.. and if you flyfish, take #2-4 purple egg sucking leeches. Great fishing could be had with any luck at all up top.


    -Dan
    The two loudest sounds known to man: a gun that goes bang when it is supposed to go click and a gun that goes click when it is supposed to go bang.

  20. #20
    Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Birmingham, AL
    Posts
    19

    Default

    Thanks Dan. Very helpful...

Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •