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Thread: wet weather boots

  1. #1
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    Default wet weather boots

    I will be hunting deer on P.O.W. in late Aug. what type of boots do you guys use to stay dry and have good traction.
    Thanks, garyrad

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    if it says Danner and Gortex in the same patch of leather... you will do good... i don't hunt SE anymore but wear them in all the swamps in the interior. i wear out 2 pairs a year on average as i wear them every day i like the pronghorn models my self... but have always had good luck in any condition with Danners.
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

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    Member L. G.'s Avatar
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    Calked Meindls. Sending in a pair to Hoffman's today. My older pair wore out - the boots, not the carbide spikes. Should have them in time for opening day.

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    Member jdb3's Avatar
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    Schnee's work very well, I've worn them for years working in the woods of Southeast Alaska. Jim

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    Another vote for Hoffman's. They were a Christmas gift from my best friend. Some of the best boots I have.

  6. #6
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
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    I wear Lacrosse Burly's for everything except sheep. Comfortable, warm, waterproof and knee high.
    The worst part about them is also one of the best parts: They're ankle fit, so they're great for walking in, but it also makes them a real pain to take off.
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

  7. #7

    Default Boots for POW

    If I'm climbing to the alpine I'm wearing my caulked (by Hoffman's) Lowa Sheep Hunters. Usually with gaiters for additional protection. If I'm working a muskeg system without a lot of climbing I'm usually wearing xtratufs. My caulked leather boots are the single best gear decision I've made since moving to SE.

  8. #8
    Member ACNDHO's Avatar
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    Xtratuffs are THE boot for S.E. period. All the locals that live there every day can't be wrong in their boot selection. That's all I wore for the 20 years I lived there stompin around in the pucker brush. Good Luck
    Even a jackass won't stumble on the same stone twice.

  9. #9

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    I bought a pair of the arctic insulated Muck boots a few years back and I wear them everywhere now...they are more comfortable, have better traction and keep my feet warmer than Xtratuff boots ever did. I also have a pair of Danner boots with Gortex and insulation but I still prefer the Muck boots for wet terrain.

  10. #10
    Member muskeg's Avatar
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    Like mentioned above, many hunters in SE wear Caulks (corks) ... go to Hoffmanboots.com and look at the leather Logger section. They aslo will Cork most when you send them in. Depending on the wear.

    I don't require my Deer hunters to get Corks like I do my Goat hunters but most of my repeat Deer hunters are sporting a pair of Corks.

    Other than Corks you just need a good pair of leather waterproof (goretex) mountain boots ... preverbally with airbob (or other good gripping) soles. Extratuffs just don't have the ankle support (none) that I need. If you have strong ankles they do have Corked Extratuffs.

    August will not be cold so heavy insulated boots are not necessary.

  11. #11
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Load and distance make a difference in this discussion. Throw terrain into the mix and you've got variable number three.

    Short and wet: Any high waterproof boot will do, heck some folks even use waders. I'd say out past 5miles total for the day and you'd consider something different.

    Long and heavy: Your gonna get tired and thats when you start getting sloppy. The support of a well made mountaineering boot is helpful. I also believe that the extra material on the lower leg protects my skin from impacts and abrasions while slogging through the unkept timber.

    Danner, Mendeli, Kentreck, Lowa, ect..........just make sure your happy with it.

    I've never used corks so I can't comment on em. It makes sense and I like having lots of boots around.

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    It doesn't matter what I'm hunting, wet always seems to be a factor. I wear Lowa because they fit me like no other. Leather and GoreTex with a hard sole I can set into uneven ground. I like my Burly boots for flat country but don't prefer them for climbing and absolutely hate them for descending. Gaitors are always a good idea for wet weather and brushy terrain.

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    Been working in the woods in SE for over 20 years. Tried lots of different boots and the best I've found are Danner Pronghorn Caulks. Goretex keeps them pretty waterproof.

    http://www.loggingsupply.com/catalog...roducts_id/542

    Unfortunately the caulks are pretty loud for alpine bowhunting so they don't get used for that. Get em and you won't be sorry.

  14. #14
    Member kjashen's Avatar
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    meindl canada pro's....best boot ever.

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    Let me sum this up for you:

    Quote Originally Posted by L. G. View Post
    Calked
    Quote Originally Posted by jtm9 View Post
    Hoffman's.
    Quote Originally Posted by Fullcurl View Post
    caulked (by Hoffman's)
    Quote Originally Posted by muskeg View Post
    Caulks (corks) ... go to Hoffmanboots.com
    Quote Originally Posted by ibohnt View Post
    Caulks.
    I concur.

  16. #16
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    I agree with AK DUX:
    The LaCross Burlys are great.
    Good support, warm, and WATERPROOF. I don't have trouble getting mine off and on, but my wife often needs help with her's. It probably has to do with fit. We've used them for hunting several years. Once in the snow.

    Just the other day I noticed another boot in SW, and I just couldn't resist them. They are made by the "MUCK Boot Company". They call them the "Fieldblazer". Both my wife and I got a pair. I guess we don't really need them since we already have the LaCross Burly's, and they're proven, but these will take the place of regular Knee Boots.

    http://muckbootsdirect.net/outdoor-a...port-boot.html

    I wore mine the other day to the rifle range, to test them, and they felt great all day.

    You might consider them. I gave up on leather boots for hunting. It seems it's always wet or cold, and leather only kept my feet warm and dry for a short time.

    Smitty of the North
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  17. #17
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Late Aug in P.O.W. means alpine. Not a place for rubber boots..no matter how much I like my Burlys. I'd much rather wear a wet pair of leathers in the alpine than any rubber boot. Corks are the way to go, but I haven't worn a set in 20 yrs. I did some surveying work in S.E. back then and corks were priceless.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

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