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Thread: personal use question

  1. #1

    Default personal use question

    A question came up the other day about personal use fisheries and I thought I would post it here.

    The regs say:

    A non-resident can not participate in a personal use fishery, they cannot fish, handle the fish, or the gear.

    At the same time, fish caught under a personal use permit can only be consumed by permit holder and members of his/her immediate family.

    If a member of your family is a non-resident, can they consume the fish caught under a personal use permit (I suppose that would be awkward at dinner...fish us, hotdogs for you)? Can they be listed on your permit as members of your household and therefore increase your legal harvest limit from 15 to 30?

    I don't know how a family member could be a non-resident, but maybe a step-son or daughter, mail order bride, your mom/dad/brother/sister moves up from lower 48 and moves in under your care?

    You have to live in the state for a year (among a few other things) to qualify for a resident fishing license. Do you have to meet the same qualifications to be listed as a household member on a personal use permit?

    Any thoughts?

  2. #2

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    The federal rules, say I don't even need a Alaska Fishing License. I have to pack out my fish, with out outside help. Now if someone who lives here, and qualifies for a permit wants to help pack they can help pack my fish out for me. For example my neighbors filled there 30 sockeye limit quickly, at the Russian River Falls. They could help me pack out my 30 Sockeye salmon, but a brother/sister from Anchorage could not help pack or touch.

  3. #3
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    bobblehead,

    The technicality of those regs has never or rarely been enforced to the letter of the phrase you're referencing.

    Example; a year or two ago a particular state representative from the Interior served Copper River dip-net salmon from the pu fishery as a portion of the 'eats' at a fund-raiser he held. Clearly, those present were only immediate members of his family if one literally accepts religious references to "all persons being brothers and sisters."

    The question was publicly raised re. the representative in question and his use of pu salmon at a fund-raiser.. As far as I know, nothing came of it, and those who harped about it were ridiculed in thel ocal paper's comments section as being petty and partisan.

    Personally, and not for any particular pointed dislike of the guy, I think his use of those fish probably violated the intent of the law represented within the regulations.

    Also, the definition of 'for my and my family's own use' can become pretty vague, I suspect

    There's also the privacy issue in Alaska; any authority would have serious egg on their faces if they raided someone's home during dinner to cite someone for consuming salmon without being an immediate family member and resident. I don't think that they realistically intend to have you turn folks away from your dinner table simply because you're having fish.

    As to the prospect of having a family member who's not a resident, that could easily occur in the event that my daughter moved out-of-state, and returned home for Christmas or moved back home altogether (not that kids -ever- do -that!!) ;^>).

    At a festive gathering such as that, there's a strong likelihood that we'd have some smoked fish, and even more likely it would personal use salmon if we had any.. In that event, she'd be a non-resident, and a family member.... AND eating personal use smoked salmon with us.

    The intent of the law's questionable choice of wording was to prevent persons from bartering and selling pu fish.

  4. #4

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    Ruffle,

    Great points, I agree.

    Good example of the kid that moves away then moves back home (and you're right, that rarely happens).

    So let's say the kid has been home a few months...and it looks like he/she will be there for at least a few more. Though he or she might not yet qualify for a resident fishing/hunting license, would they qualify to be listed as household members on your permit for the purpose of increasing the limit from 15 to 30 (as is the case for Chitina, for example)?

  5. #5
    Member JOAT's Avatar
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    The rule is that anyone listed on the permit MUST also have a RESIDENT sport fishing license. No resident license, you can't be on the permit. There's no gray area on this one. They have to be here 12 months prior to the household obtaining the permit.
    Winter is Coming...

    Go GeocacheAlaska!

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by JOAT View Post
    The rule is that anyone listed on the permit MUST also have a RESIDENT sport fishing license. No resident license, you can't be on the permit. There's no gray area on this one. They have to be here 12 months prior to the household obtaining the permit.
    JOAT,
    Thanks for the info, not to question you, but can you tell me where it says that specifically?

    Thanks,
    Bobble

  7. #7
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    I don't believe that information to be accurate. I've spoken with F&G numerous times re. the regs, and those persons -fishing- are required (if over 16 y.o.) to have a sport fishing license. The family members names on the permit are to simply qualify re. the limits per family size re. the specific fishery in question. They are not required to have a sport fishing license unless they are over 16 and fishing/dip-netting.

    In the Kenai dip-net fishery each family is alotted 25 fish per head of household, and 10 fish for each additional member. The space for filling in the names of household members is merely to validate the count re. the number of persons being fed, and to list those who may be fishing, but who are not -required- to have a license unless they're -actually- fishing..

    In the Chitina fishery, each single-member household is alotted 15 fish, and each household of two or more is alotted 30 fish, with 10 additional fish typically alotted during a supplemental EO notice.

    Those listed onm the permit are NOT required to have a sport fishing license unless they're actually fishing.

    Your local Fish and Game fisheries specialists can answer these questions best. The Fbks generic office # 459-7200, then cue the proper prompt for the dept you're needing to speak with.

    And the permits don't ask if all household members have met the criteria for residency. They simply require their names if they're household members.

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