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Thread: 4 Bison GMUs...

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    Default 4 Bison GMUs...

    OK, I looked up the regs & there seems to be only 4 GMU's to hunt bison in the State of Alaska, It seems that we're the only state as well, with a huntable free range bison herd...with that we're pretty fortunate.

    However, wouldn't it be nice to have more opprotunities to hunt them? IE get ADF&G to spread the herd into neighboring GMUs & get the population rising.

    So far, I've counted the Farwell herd, the Copper River herd, the Delta Bison & one other, that I can't recall off the top of my head. I notice too, they're only allowing one hunt every 10 reg. years...

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    Talking Utah

    Did Utah secede?

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    Default AZ also and...

    MT & WY also have bison--MT has a drawing that lets some lucky people shoot the ones leaving Yellowstone. Still pretty lucky to have them here though.

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    Weren't all the bison here "planted"? I believe they were planted in places that have the appropriate habitat. Bison are not moose and need a different sort of growth for food. I think I heard that Farewell bison were planted after a large fire and the habitat is getting smaller as normal succession returns to forest.
    Yea, goalie, be great to have more. Not likely in the cards. Maybe we could get the state to start a "hatchery" and stock bison somewhere we could easily shoot them.
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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    We are getting more. For the past two years there have been ~60 woodland bison quarantined at the Wildlife Conservation Center in Portage to make sure they're clear of disease. I'm fairly certain that it is this year that they're to be released in an attempt to establish a new herd in the interior. Of course, a huntable population will take ome time to grow, but the ball is rolling.

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    Those in bison portage are Wood bison 1/3 bigger than plains bison and a few other distinguishing characteristics.To my understanding are slated to be released on native land so I am sure there needs of subsistance will take priority before a sport hunt ever takes place on them. And yes AZ, MT, UT and WY also have bison seasons. Alaska's bison were transplanted from this national bison range in Moiese MT in the 1920's. That herd came from yellowstone as a precaustion if all bison in yellowstone died off.

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    Meanwhile there is a group in Delta that want the local willd bison herd eliminated......discussed in previous threads.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by gogoalie View Post
    OK, I looked up the regs & there seems to be only 4 GMU's to hunt bison in the State of Alaska, It seems that we're the only state as well, with a huntable free range bison herd...with that we're pretty fortunate.

    However, wouldn't it be nice to have more opprotunities to hunt them? IE get ADF&G to spread the herd into neighboring GMUs & get the population rising.

    So far, I've counted the Farwell herd, the Copper River herd, the Delta Bison & one other, that I can't recall off the top of my head. I notice too, they're only allowing one hunt every 10 reg. years...

    there are otehr states with what is considered " FREE RANGE BISON" however those ranges tend to be limited to large ranges or reservations..

    Alaska's delta herd hold the distiction of being one of the very last PURE bison strain herds in the country. with out any beef bred into them
    i am unclear of the farwell or copper river herds as they do not get the attention as the delts herd does...
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    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brian M View Post
    We are getting more.
    Don't be couting the chickens before they hatch, Brian.
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    hrm, as has been stated Utah does also have a native bison herd. If I am not mistaken the Henry Mountains is the only one that wasn't a re-planted bison herd....and therefore the genetic strain is pure...but I could easily be wrong. Only 10 more years and I should draw a tag on one of those bad boys!

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    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by martentrapper View Post
    Don't be couting the chickens before they hatch, Brian.
    Perhaps, but previous posts made it sound as though there were no plans in the works. Just pointing out that things are happening. What will come of it, though, I do not know.

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    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Woodland Bison

    My understanding is that Woodland Bison are prone to respiratory diseases that affect humans. As such, they may need to be planted in remote regions.

    I would like to hunt "free range" bison but, at my age, I suspect any bison hunting will be on private ranches (probably in Wyoming where I have hunting experience).

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    The woodland Bison are supposed to be released around McGrath this summer.

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    Member Jeff Shannon's Avatar
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    It's doubtful that any wood bison will be transplanted into the wild in Alaska until they are delisted from their current threatened status under the Endangered Species Act. The so called "environmental" groups want to keep them ESA listed so they can use them as a tool to prevent resource development and the state won't release them while they're listed because they know it'll turn into a goat rodeo just like the wolf reintroduction in the northern Rockies turned into. Between the Yukon Flats, Minto Flats, and Innoko NWR there's some tremendous wood bison habitat in Alaska, but as long as the ESA looms over head it will likely remain vacant. I read somewhere a while back that the Yukon Flats alone had more wood bison habitat than all of the McKenzie Wood Bison Sanctuary where most of the worlds pure wood bison occur. There's quite a bit of good info here:

    http://www.wildlife.alaska.gov/index...me.restoration

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vince View Post
    there are otehr states with what is considered " FREE RANGE BISON" however those ranges tend to be limited to large ranges or reservations..

    Alaska's delta herd hold the distiction of being one of the very last PURE bison strain herds in the country. with out any beef bred into them
    i am unclear of the farwell or copper river herds as they do not get the attention as the delts herd does...
    That the most interesting definition of free range I've ever came across. You contradict yourself by saying "these places tend to be limited to large ranges". Using YOUR definition I could say that the delta buffalo are no different. Or any AK buffalo. So I guess AK doesn't have any free range buffalo either.

    Also Indian Reservation buffalo are not included in the states listed as having Free range herds. Indian reservations are private land, so they are considered private herds.

    So exactly Vince what is your definition of free range? That because its not in AK it can't possibly be free range?

    Two places not mentioned yet for free ranging buffalo are South Dakota and The Yukon country in Canada.

    Last I heard the buffalo from the nature center were going to native land on an island somewhere. The article was on ADN less than two months ago.

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