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Thread: Brooks water quality/Purifiier needed?

  1. #1
    Member BIG 27's Avatar
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    Default Brooks water quality/Purifiier needed?

    Any thoughts on water purification in the brooks would be appreciated. Is it necessary to purify water in clear running mountain creeks? And if so what is the best purifier on the market lightweight and compact being biggest concern.

    Thanks, Big 27
    “A man does not climb a mountain without bringing some of it away with him,and leaving something of himself upon it -- Sir Martin Conway

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Lots of water in the brooks coming from up high.....and clean, I don't bring water filter....I only drink out of rock and gravel streams and not water flowing through tundra, If I am anticipating not finding water....I use two part purifier into a 32 oz. Gatorade bottle, they have both, tablets and liquid available in most stores around Anchorage...

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Always a good idea to filter water. Frequently I have crossed a crystal clear stream high in the rocks only to find a dead squirrel or similar or animal feces in the stream 50' higher! That being said I have not purified water in the Brooks in almost 20 hunts into ANWR. I should also acknowledge that I have had giardia at least 3 times.

  4. #4
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Filter

    I used two kinds last year.

    Once on Brooks Range ridge I found a runoff area that was very silty. I dug a depression and filtered that mucky stuff to produce a light brown water with a MSR ceramic. I then zapped it with a Steri Pen. I also found a bug infested high alpine watering hole. I think you guys would call that tundra where it was. I cleaned that up too.

    I hate dropping off a ridge. The other option is gathering snow and rain.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    there is an article by Michael Strahan here on the forum...

    http://www.outdoorsdirectory.com/mag..._the_water.htm


    that is well worth reading. there is not a single body of water i would drink unfiltered water from anymore... Giardia has spread like wildfire across the state since the 1970's


    here are a few excerpts from the arctical... click the link above to read the entire thing.... a small water filter bottle is well worth the expense and hassle...



    WHERE DID IT COME FROM? (AND CAN WE SEND IT BACK?)

    The first documented case of a waterborne outbreak Giardia in the United States was in 1970, in Aspen, Colorado; possibly carried there by travelers who had recently returned to Colorado from Leningrad, Russia. It is known that Leningrad's municipal water supply was contaminated with Giardia at that time. From there, giardia swept the nation's remote waters at a phenomenal rate, being carried from state to state by humans and other mammals. Early records by residents and visitors of the Alaska Territory make no mention of giardia, but by the 1980's it was well established in the state. Some maintain that it's been here all along- and we just started noticing it . (Yeah, RIGHT! Like I'm not gonna notice my guts knotted up like a balloon animal for a couple of weeks!) Since that time, it has spread throughout the state at a phenomenal rate to the point where most river systems and lakes are potentially affected. Those that aren't soon will be. It's just a matter of time.

    FILTER IS BETTER THAN SELTZER!

    Avoiding giardia is of course much better than dealing with the results of getting it in the first place. What follows is a listing of the best methods of saying "Adios, Amoeba!" to the little critter, and keeping your intestinal tract smiling.

    Unless you enjoy the taste of iodine tablets in your water or have plenty of extra fuel lying around with which to boil your water (giardia and other similar critters will be dead by the time the water boils), the single best option (besides staying home and watching the nature channel) is to filter your water. ALL of it. Giardia cysts are about 13 microns in length , which is well within the filtration capacities of recreational water filter systems. If you're traveling alone or with one or two other people you can get by with a simple individual water filter such as the MSR Waterworks II filter or the Miniworks filter. Both of these filters allow you to screw your wide-mouth Nalgene® bottles directly to the filter, which makes filling them much easier than the filters by Pur or Katadyn- which have hoses out the end. Additionally, the MSR filters pump from the side, which is more user-friendly than the end-pumpers that Pur and Katadyn offer. End-pumpers leave you looking for a rock to brace the filter on, but since the hose comes out the end you're mostly out of luck. For three people or more, you should take a serious look at a bulk filtration system such as the one offered by Cascade Outfitters. This is a gravity-feed system that filters three gallons of water for you in about fifteen minutes! Just think- you can be cooking dinner while your water is filtering- no more endless pumping, pumping, p-u-m-p-i-n-g! It's the best system by far for groups, and costs about $200. Money well spent. On rafting trips, we just hang the three-gallon water bag on a tripod made of oars, set the hose and filter up and filter our water right into a three-gallon clear jug with a spigot! Simple!

    Be sure to wash your hands with filtered water before you eat, and use filtered water to wash produce- rather than raw river water. Raw river water can be used to cook with because the boiling action will kill the cysts- but all other water you use should be filtered.

    my experience with folks that have gotten it has left a life long impression and a desire to never get it... and my understanding is that once you have been affected it is twice as easy to get again in that your body never fully recovers from it.... at least that is what has been explained to me by friends whom have suffered it....
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

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    Member shphtr's Avatar
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    Actually, with continued recurrent infections an asymptomatic symbiotic relationship tends to develop between the parasite and the host .... as a rule ... and as we all know that,"rules are made to be broken". My recommendation is not to try to be an exception.

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    New member Targetman's Avatar
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    Default dont take a chance

    I live to sheep hunt. I cuss and swear and complain about how bad I feel everytime I get into sheep country, but as soon as I am heading home we are already talking about next years hunt! With me, I only get one sheep hunt per year, which isnt enough. So, I do not like taking a chance on getting sick in the middle of one. The chances of getting sick may be very slim if you drink directly out of a clear, flowing, rocky stream, but then again getting sick could ruin the entire hunt! I got giardia once in Colorado, and I was sick for 3 whole days. It was miserable and I never want to experience that again. If I have to pack an extra pound of water filter up the mtn, then that is what I will do. The risk just isnt worth it to lose an entire sheep hunt!

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    MSR Hyperflow, 7ozs. 6L Dromlite bladder for "camp" water in sheep country. Otherwise just screw it on to my Kelty 3L bladder and filler-up.

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    Member BIG 27's Avatar
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    Who carries them snyd in town and what is the price?

    Tim
    “A man does not climb a mountain without bringing some of it away with him,and leaving something of himself upon it -- Sir Martin Conway

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    Quote Originally Posted by BIG 27 View Post
    Who carries them snyd in town and what is the price?

    Tim
    I bought mine at Beaver Sports a couple years ago. Just under 100 bucks I think.

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    Member BIG 27's Avatar
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    Default thank you

    Thanks snyd
    “A man does not climb a mountain without bringing some of it away with him,and leaving something of himself upon it -- Sir Martin Conway

  12. #12

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    I 2nd the dromlite. Been using one for 2 years now. They are WAY nice for camp water when your source is a ways away. Snyd, I have heard horror stories about the hyperflows and freezing temps with the fibers breaking off and what not. Apparently you haven't had any issues with that??? Thats the only reason went with the 11 oz hiker pro over the 7 oz hyperflow filter.

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    Member dkwarthog's Avatar
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    Bighorse mentioned the steripen....anyone have any experience or comments on how effective that device is or any drawbacks to it??

  14. #14

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    Did a quick Google search - the MSR Dromlite 6L Hydration Bag shows up at Eastern Mountain Sports online for 32.95.

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    Member CGSwimmer25's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dkwarthog View Post
    Bighorse mentioned the steripen....anyone have any experience or comments on how effective that device is or any drawbacks to it??
    I use the steripen & haven't got sick yet!! I just purchased a prefilter for it that screws into your nalgene bottle and filters out the sediment, then you stick the steripen down in and sterilize the water. I have a few friends in the service that teach survival school and they take them out in the field, filter stagnent water through their shirts, then use the steripen and they don't have any bad reviews on it either. I have used it for two years without the pre-filter but figured I would give it a try this season because it only costs a few bucks and weighs next to nothing.

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    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    I have the Katahdyn Pro Hiker. No complaints with it. There may be a better option if you are setting up camp and running large amounts of water at a time, but the Pro Hiker is good if you plan to be mobile and only fill up a few bottles at a time.

    I will always take it with me, no matter which range I'm hunting. I also take a bottle of iodine tablets as backup. That is one area I'm willing to add a bit of weight. I figure a few ounces more weight is better than a few days of intestinal havoc.

  17. #17

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    I have the sweetwater and really like it. I've considered going to the aqua mira drops...still in the back of my mind.

    as for to filter or not...in 03 we drank unfiltered water from a high mt flowing creek and both of us got the 'fever' lol. NEVER again! Thankfully it didnt hit me as hard as it hit my partner!!!

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    Check out the Katadyn and the MSR gravity filters, they weigh about the same as a pump filter, but instead of pumping you are hunting, let gravity do the work.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Targetman View Post
    http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/te...box.jsp.form23

    It appears that the Hyperflow is on sale at Cabelas for $30.....
    It looks like it's just the replacement filter.

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