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Thread: Big River Reds

  1. #1

    Default Big River Reds

    I've never fished the Kenai for reds before but will be hitting a similar sized river. How do you pick a good spot for Reds when the whole river seems moderate and without much structure of fast tumbling riffles. In the pics of Kenai Red fishers, you are all lined up and it's more of a fight to get a spot rather than try to find a good spot. So when you are just fishing and swinging flies, do you just blindly cast and let the fly drift/swing hoping for the best or is there a way to improve the odds and actually catch fish on purpose when you can't see them.

    If you don't see fish boiling/surfacing, does that mean there's few to none there and not worth it or is it a matter of put your time in, have your fly swinging in case some do come through? I've just been fishing Kings, but the few sockeye that I have fought were an absolute blast.

  2. #2
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    Jul 2006
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    salt lake city ut
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Big Bad Bob View Post
    I've never fished the Kenai for reds before but will be hitting a similar sized river. How do you pick a good spot for Reds when the whole river seems moderate and without much structure of fast tumbling riffles. In the pics of Kenai Red fishers, you are all lined up and it's more of a fight to get a spot rather than try to find a good spot. So when you are just fishing and swinging flies, do you just blindly cast and let the fly drift/swing hoping for the best or is there a way to improve the odds and actually catch fish on purpose when you can't see them.

    If you don't see fish boiling/surfacing, does that mean there's few to none there and not worth it or is it a matter of put your time in, have your fly swinging in case some do come through? I've just been fishing Kings, but the few sockeye that I have fought were an absolute blast.
    LOOK FOR FAST MOVEING WATER if you dont see them they are probably just above the bottom a few feet in front of you. its all about getting youre weight down fast cast at 10 drift to 2 if youre weight taps bottom a few times your doing it rite. dont stand way out into the river stay as far back as you can if youre 4 feet out the fish are swiming behind you.use a 3/0 coho fly tied to 4.5 ft of 20lb mono then a swivle to my main 25 pound solar green big game I have a slider with my weight on the main line look for my other post for pictures thats what works for me good luck have fun, ps I rarly see the fish I catch its all about feel on the lower kenai.

  3. #3

    Default

    I read some of the old posts, there's some very good material there. I never did find the picture of your rig. What purpose does the sliding sinker have?

    I've been using split shot most and snag-less pencil lead style sinkers a little. With three moderately large split shots I am ticking the bottom regularly. But as implied, I am a little inexperienced on the reds. The few that I caught, I was fishing moderate water, not fast, and I was casting a country mile for them, if I threw in short it seemed like I never got sockeyes, just them funny pinks.

    What is a typical day on the lower Kenai fishing for reds? How many fish and hook-ups per time spent? Some call it the fish of 1000 casts??? Is it really that slow a deal unless in ideal conditions?

    Thanks!

  4. #4
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    Jul 2006
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    salt lake city ut
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    409

    Default Slider

    The slider helps you feel the fish better because the weight is not felt on you're line as for the fish of 1000 casts it all depends how many fish are moving thru the area you're fishing.I've caught a six fish limit in less than 20 casts but that was on a 96000 fish day five or six years ago. But if there aren't fish in the river you will cast all day and not hook Any.

  5. #5

    Default

    Change things up as well. No bite try a bit further out maybe cast at 11-12 etc. Don't tap the bottom to much like some dragging it on bottom

  6. #6

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    So would the slider be of good value on longer casts too?

    I'm trying to understand these runs, obviously I do not. How long do these runs last? I'm fishing just south of you guys on the Skeena in BC, and I think conditions would be similar to the Kenai. I thought the fish started running at end of June, slowly at first then progressively started running in bigger numbers until the run peaks, then start slowing down until the run ends, basically over a two month period.

    Is that an inaccurate account of Red run?

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