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Thread: Suoer Cub

  1. #1
    Member Searunner's Avatar
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    Default Suoer Cub

    I have been sitting here reading posts for 2 hours and beginning to wonder why is the Super Cub so versatile and desired? What is the largest motor for these planes? Also how do plane motors last for so long?

  2. #2
    Member Float Pilot's Avatar
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    You have to think of planes and how they compare to other vehicles.

    The Cessna 172 is like a Dodge Stratus. Good mileage, a little cramped but still comfy.

    A C-206 with Alaskan mods is like a Chevy Suburban. Roomy and you can beat on it to a point.

    A DH2 Beaver is like an old Army 2.5 ton (Deuce and a half) truck... once it is up and moving you better get out of the way...

    My PA-11 90 horse Cub is kinda like a WWII Willies Army-jeep, nimble and tough, but you have to watch out due to limited horsepower.

    A Super Cub is like a Jeep CJ-5. A tricked out Alaskan Super Cub is like a CJ-5 with big tires and heavy off road gear. They are loud, not very comfy for long periods and not so fast... But they are what you need for bashing and slashing...

    As for horse power:

    The first Super Cubs had a C-90 engine (95 hp at take-off), they then moved their way up through the Lyc 0-235 engines (105 or 108 hp) the 125 horse 0-290 and the 135 horse 0-290D2 engines. Around the mid 1950s they hit upon the Lyc 0-320 150 horse engine which was the mainstay for many, many years.
    Lots of Super-Cubs up here have gone to 0-360 180 horse engines. There is one locally that is producing a little more than 200 hp from a 0-360.

    Aircraft engines when properly maintained have a service life expressed in hours. While the recommended time to overhaul an engine, say 2,000 hours for a 0-320 is fixed for commercial operators, many private folks can go far past that point by occasionally changing out the cylinders and pistons as time goes on. A few years ago I sold a plane with a 0-320 that had 4,600 hours since it had been totally rebuilt... But I had changed all the cylinders and pistons 4 times and also changed the oil every 20-25 hours of flight time.

    You often find planes for sale with engines that have not been flown for years.... In a place like Alaska, or other states with temp extremes, an engine that has been sitting for years is not so desirable. Exposed eternal engine parts such as the cam lobs can develop pitted rust, since no new oil had been moved through the engine while it has been sitting.
    Floatplane,Tailwheel and Firearms Instructor- Dragonfly Aero
    Experimental Hand-Loader, NRA Life Member
    http://site.dragonflyaero.com

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    Quote Originally Posted by Searunner View Post
    I have been sitting here reading posts for 2 hours and beginning to wonder why is the Super Cub so versatile and desired? What is the largest motor for these planes? Also how do plane motors last for so long?
    Cubs are exceptional short field performers. An average pilot can easily land and take-off at gross weight from a 500' flat area. A good Cub pilot can do it in 250'. That's a guy plus about 400# of whatever he can fit into the plane. Many Cubs have increased weight capacity so the load may be pilot plus 600#. They'll fly fine with more than that, too

    Typical Supercubs have 150 or 160 horsepower. Some have 180hp. All have a suggested lifetime of 2000 operational hours, but most will be overhauled prior to reaching it. Some will operate safely beyond that. Commercial operators are required to overhaul at 2000 hours. Private operators are not. The general rule is that engines that get used regularly will last longer than engines that sit.

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