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Thread: Replacing Net - Best method for tying on new net?

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    Member AKMooseMan's Avatar
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    Question Replacing Net - Best method for tying on new net?

    Hi everyone, this has to be out there but my searches didn't find it...

    I have a few of Mike's 5' dip nets and after many years of repairs, it's finally time to actually replace the nets. I have the nets, but am curious about options for tying the new net on.

    What approaches / knots have you used? What worked and what didn't?

    And before anyone not familiar with Mike's nets asks...the hoop is welded, so I can't just slide the old net off and slide the new one on

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    Member Derby06's Avatar
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    I would say Zip Ties.

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    I've used zip ties before, but that can cause abrasion at each point of connection and lead to the new net failing sooner. The last two years I have wrapped each web to the hoop with electrical tape. I'm not sure if it's the best option out there, but so far so good.

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    I briefly webbed crab pots 30-some years ago, and they sell a specific twine/rope that's used for attaching that webbing.

    If you don't want to use zip-ties, call up one of the crab pot companies and ask them where they get their twine/rope, or ask if they'll sell you enough of it for your project.

    If you decide to use that, you can choose whether or not you wish to wrap each place the mesh contacts the hoop with an individual piece of rope, or continue on around using more or less one continuous piecce, tying each mesh opening with a series of half-hitches that lock themselves in place, and then proceeding on to the next mesh opening with slack wrapped as you go, as one might do on a crab or shrimp pot.

    It ain't all that fast, but it's sturdy, and afterward you'll have an appreciation for what those poor buggers contend with who wrap those pots.... as well as what hopefully turns into an attractive and functional piece of gear. ;^>)

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    Quote Originally Posted by ruffle View Post
    I briefly webbed crab pots 30-some years ago, and they sell a specific twine/rope that's used for attaching that webbing...If you decide to use that, you can choose whether or not you wish to wrap each place the mesh contacts the hoop with an individual piece of rope, or continue on around using more or less one continuous piecce, tying each mesh opening with a series of half-hitches that lock themselves in place...
    Yea - That was pretty much my current plan. I already have the "twine" and just couldn't decide on individual pieces or one continuous piece - just as you described...I've got till next Thursday...sounds like a beer (or several), a good DVD or two or three...and I'm there

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    Default Ruffle, as Johnnie Carson would say,

    "I did not know that"! Good point. I don't own a mike's welding net but have seen them when I have visited his shop. I did not know that there is not a way to open the hoop to put another net back on.
    Mike is a stand up guy and I think if someone went to his shop, with a replacement net and pole in hand, asked him to cut and then reweld after new netting is in place. I betting it would not cost more than 15-20 bucks.
    A quick cut and a quick weld. Just remember to brag on how much you like his nets-- scratch his ego and it might be even cheaper
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AKMooseMan View Post
    Yea - That was pretty much my current plan. I already have the "twine" and just couldn't decide on individual pieces or one continuous piece - just as you described...I've got till next Thursday...sounds like a beer (or several), a good DVD or two or three...and I'm there
    I use heavy gangion line from Donaldson’s about 500 # One roll will last year’s also take camping for “camp rope” I just use one continuous piece and tie at top of hoop. Just put loose net and tape or tie net in place in 4 places and start stringing at top of hoop and go for it. It is strong and will last a long time. If worried about abrasion I have in the past wrapped my hoops with plastic electrical conduit that I cut lengthwise and slipped it over the hoop. It lasted for years when fishing the copper from a boat and was hard to get on but would not just come off easy. I quit the copper when road was closed as went to Hailey creek to launch my zodiac.
    I also use a little strip duck tape for a quick fix on the river if net gets a small hole in it. Zip ties make the net tangle a lot. But that’s just me.

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    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    "I did not know that"! Good point. I don't own a mike's welding net but have seen them when I have visited his shop. I did not know that there is not a way to open the hoop to put another net back on.
    Mike is a stand up guy and I think if someone went to his shop, with a replacement net and pole in hand, asked him to cut and then reweld after new netting is in place. I betting it would not cost more than 15-20 bucks.
    A quick cut and a quick weld. Just remember to brag on how much you like his nets-- scratch his ego and it might be even cheaper
    Don't you think the heat from the weld would melt the webbing close to it? like a match melting mono fishing line.

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    If it were me i'd just sew in another row of top meshes around the hoop, use some heavier twine or doubled twine. OR start twine(tarred if possible) at end of hoop pick up 2-3 meshes, space about 3-4" and tie on to hoop with a clove hitch then pick up another 2-3 meshes, space and tie on to hoop do this all the way around the hoop till done. This gives me a idea for a new division of the shrimp pot biz?? re webbing dip nets, bring them on this fall !!!

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    I have a couple of Mike's nets. I took them in last year and told the girl I needed new nets on both of them. Left them there and came back in a couple hours. They both had new nets tied on, provided by Mike's Welding, for 30 bucks total. This is the best method.

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    Default Steve, thought of that and so did mike

    Read the post above. How do you think he gets them on there in the first place?
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

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    Nothin' prettier on a pot or a net than a nicely done series of six or so snugly-tight half-hitches all lined up in a row with a slight 2"-3" run of tight diagonal tarred line between them. It's artwork, by golly!!

    I'd hold at 1 or 2 beers though. Otherwise it might turn into macrame' of some sort, and -then- what would the neighbors think??

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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska Hockey View Post
    Zip ties make the net tangle a lot. But that’s just me.
    Yea, That was my fear but saw other people and tried it. Gotta definitely cut them flush and clean. We'll see how I fair. I also bought a bunch of electrical conduit plastic like that is used in vehicle wiring and plan on covering with that. Kinda funny, I am finding the lil zip ties also work as net connectors when replacing or for quick onsite repairs....
    I never had an issue until dipping in Chitna this year. That place is hell on a net....

    IN EDIT: I dipped the Kasilof on the opener and the zip ties worked well..... But that is only one 3 day fishing expedition....lol

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    Default Net Protection

    I use old garden hose taped around the rim. Makes the net last. Also I used to use zip ties but it gets very frustrating untangling the net constantly.

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    Default new net methods

    Don't like zip ties because they catch on your net during use.

    Don't like electrical tape because some of the fish will see the black tape and swim around it.

    Halibut cord and a bunch of good knots can do it.

    Or if you use zip ties, make them small ones and then use grey duct tape on each one to avoid the snagging problem.

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    Default braided fish line

    zip ties are a pain-I like some form of tough braided line (halibut cord)- B&J's sells it off spools.

    I tie the first loop of the net right where the hoop joins the pole,

    then work my way around the hoop wrapping each loop of the net to the hoop,

    about every fifth loop I do multiple raps and give it a bunch of half hitch (I think this helps it keep from slipping around the hoop while your fishing). I'm no knot tying expert but it works well and if the line busts while your fishing you have a lot of extra line to work with and can tie it off where it breaks.

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    Arrow Cut Mike's Net Frame? Why???

    Quote Originally Posted by thewhop2000 View Post
    "I did not know that"! Good point. I don't own a mike's welding net but have seen them when I have visited his shop. I did not know that there is not a way to open the hoop to put another net back on.
    Mike is a stand up guy and I think if someone went to his shop, with a replacement net and pole in hand, asked him to cut and then reweld after new netting is in place. I betting it would not cost more than 15-20 bucks.
    A quick cut and a quick weld. Just remember to brag on how much you like his nets-- scratch his ego and it might be even cheaper
    I own one of Mike's nets. Its net bag is tied to the hoop - NOT threaded onto it. There is no need to cut the hoop to install a new bag. Simply tie on another, as others have suggested here.

    My bag ties wore through during its first season, and I must re-tie the bottom portion of my net back onto the hoop. The tie cords at the bottom of the hoop are prone to abrasion on the river's bottom. Be sure to wrap or cover the bottom part of the hoop ties to protect these ties and the outermost loops of the bag's netting from premature wear and failure. Duct tape wrappings, plastic or rubber hose, or flexible conduit are all possible protective options to cover these ties.

    Dan

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    Premium Member kasilofchrisn's Avatar
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    I bought some hanging twine at Silvertip in kasilof. It works best if you also buy one of the plastic Needles made to do the task. Cost was about $2.50 for the needle and@ $10 for the twine
    You wind a bunch of twine on the needle and sew the net on as one continuous piece. It is not really all that hard once you see someone sew a small portion. I picked it up easily and although not perfect it looked good and worked great.
    "The closer I get to nature the farther I am from idiots"

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    I find it so ironic that I'm laughing. PU fishermen are so quick to the podium to complain about the commercial guys taking all the fish. Now, they can't figure out how to work the commercial fishing gear that they have claimed for their own fishery. Why don't you ask a commercial fisherman how they tie the net to the cork and lead lines? It's a very simple skill and no, they don't "thread" the net onto anything. Just lay it alongside and wrap some twine around it. For what a dipnet needs to do, you can tie the net with 3-5 wraps at about 8-inch intervals and it will work perfectly.
    Winter is Coming...

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    Well, JOAT, I'd suggest you tie -every- loop of top mesh in place on the hoop, creating a wrap with gaps of about 3" or so, unless you're looking to have a poorly attached net on your hoop.

    Catch and release works best with fishing lines in my experience.

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