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Thread: Skate Recipes?

  1. #1
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    Default Skate Recipes?

    Does anyone have any truly amazing (or even just tasty) recipes for skate? We often catch them in Cook Inlet, and the tale goes that some commercial entities used to process the tube-shaped strands of muscle/tissue in the 'wings' into scallop substitutes (or fake scallops).

    If anyone else has a use for these, I'd appreciate it.

    My son caught a skate that might've gone 6 ft. across last year, and wanted to keep it, but I decided against it.

    I'm fairly sure we'll get into them again this year, and want to be able to let him keep his skate (as well as his halibut) if there's something that can be done with the thing that doesn't cause me to regret bringing it on board.

    Thanks.

  2. #2
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    Default Steamed Stingray

    I've only had them cooked like scallops. Lots of recipes on the net for those.

    Here's a recipe that sounds good:


    Steamed Stingray with Lemongrass, Ginger, Orange and Lime

    Ingredients :

    4 x pan-ready Stingray fillets - (6 oz ea)
    1 x lemongrass stalk
    3 cup orange juice
    2 tbl butter
    1/2 cup lime juice
    2 tsp thinly-sliced fresh ginger
    Fresh Chives or scallion tops for garnish
    Lime juice for garnish

    Method :
    Discard tough leaves and woody base of lemongrass. Thinly slice the
    tender portion of the lemongrass stem. In the base of a steamer,
    combine lemongrass, orange juice, lime juice and ginger; bring to a
    boil.
    Arrange Stingray on steamer rack or basket, fit to pan, cover tightly.
    Reduce heat; steam for 5 minutes or just until Stingray "flakes" easily
    when tested with a fork. If rack will not hold all of the Stingray at
    one time, steam in two batches.
    Using a wide slotted spatula, carefully transfer Stingray from the
    steamer rack to heatproof platter or individual serving plates;
    keep warm.
    Turn heat to high, cook juices, uncovered, for 10 to 15 minutes or
    until sauce is reduced by about one-half (should have consistency
    of syrup).
    Strain sauce over fish. Garnish with lime slices and chives or scallion
    tops.
    This recipe yields 4 servings.
    Comments: If fresh lemongrass is unavailable, increase ginger to
    1 tablespoon or substitute 1 teaspoon lemon zest.

  3. #3
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    Default Skate

    have tried them a couple of ways, an all that I have tried have not turned
    very good good luck on your endevor
    SID

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    Default

    Thanks AkGuppy and Sid.

    Not certain how close in characteristics rays are to skates, though they have some commonalities when you glance at them, for sure.

    The recipe sounds pretty tasty. Almost read like a citrus stir-fry there for a moment, until I read the bit about the steamer.

    I hadn't done an internet search yet, hoping someone with similar Cook Inlet experiences as ours had a home-spun recipe. On the other hand, I guess most recipes started in -someone's- home...

    I guess I'll do my best this year to process the things, and see what meat we can salvage out of the 'wings'.

    I've also wondered, since they're a member of the shark family (at least per my understanding, which might be flawed), do I need to skin and gut them immediately like a salmon shark, in order to prevent the build-up of ammonia that can occur so quickly with sharks??

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    Member AKGUPPY's Avatar
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    Default

    I would think so. You might also try marinating fillets in milk or buttermilk, this'll help break down any "off" taste.

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    Default

    I use to work on commercial fishing boat on the east coast. We'd catch tons of skates as bycatch and occasionally the crew would keep and cook up some.

    The Italian guys would cook them one of two ways. Cut off the wings (this was the only part I ever saw consumed) and rinse them well. Rub with a bit of oil and salt and pepper. Lay in a single layer in a baking dish. Cover with your favorite red sauce. Bake (I don't remember exact time but I think something like 20-30 mins at 350). Remover, add some grated cheese, and serve with a side of pasta. Often this dish would be a combination of different type of small fish (herring, sardines, small whitefish, or whatever was in the last trawl) simply gutted and then cooked whole. When severed you'd take a selection of small whole fish and wings and pick the meat off the bones as you ate.

    The other way was to cut them in chunks, bread them, and then either bake or deep fry them. Pretty much the same as any breaded fish. The 'bones' in the wing are tough and not editable so you have eat around them.

    The Asian guys would often put skate wings in a soup. Basically just boil them with a variety of veggies and spices.

    I think the flavor a skate wings in pretty good (it's mild and a little bit like a scallop) but the meat is a bit stringy so I know the texture can be off putting for some.

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    Default

    Thanks, Chris. I just now saw your reply.

    Sounds pretty basic in terms of the different cultures' typical preparation methods. Italians tending toward a marinara sauce with various cheeses, Asians with a basic soup or stir-fry and accompanying veggies, and, of course, the werstern approach of deep-frying or frying.

    The comments about bones surprises me a bit. I didn't realize they had any bones in their 'wings'. Are they large enough bones to easily spot and remove??

    I also liked the lemon grass and citrus dish (Asian) that AKGUPPY posted from the internet as well. It sounds like something we'd cook here. I may try my standard Thai squid recipe, but replace the squid with a boneless bunch-o-skates instead of the squid.

    But the personal experience with cooking skates is very helpful due to not having any memory of ever fixing the stuff, and another's personal experience goes beyond the hypothetical nature of cook books..

    Thanks everyone.

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    The 'bones' in the wings are not typical fish bones but rather cartilage. They are not like fish bones at all. They're tough and rubbery after being cooked and are quite easy to remove as they are rather thick (the size of a pencil in big barn door skate but obviously smaller in smaller skates). There is a fan of these 'bones' through the center of the wing. You can remove them by filleting the wing in a similar manner as you would a flounder. I found an interesting write-up and recipe for skate wings on this blog...might be worth a read. http://beyondsalmon.blogspot.com/200...kate-wing.html

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    I meant to mention that Murphy's law was in full force for our halibut outing to Cook Inlet a couple weeks ago. Murphy says "When one goes fishing with specific recipes in mind, it's nearly guaranteed that none of that particular species will be caught."

    True to form, this was the first trip to that area in years that we didn't catch even a single skate! (Not that I'm complaining a whole bunch or anything... We did, after all, limit out on halibut...)

  10. #10
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    Default

    This 'Butt's for you!

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