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Thread: Aerial Scouting for Moose

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default Aerial Scouting for Moose

    A friend of mine wants to go, which will only cost me my half of fuel costs. so.... what are your thoughts on this issue?

    Which brings me to my second question. Does anyone know what the restrictions are for flying the pipeline, preferably the Dalton Hwy Corridor, the person at Alyeska Don't know s****!!!! .....would like to fly low altitude/speed and was curious about Homeland security bs, would like to do this a few days prior to driving up for my archery hunt.... I know i'll be road hunting, but most of the moose are usually not seen from the road and are a mile or two in either direction.

  2. #2

    Thumbs up

    Early morning right after daybreak is best. Try to be in the hunting grounds early am. Next best is late evening.
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    Call the people who will be giving you a ticket IF you did something wrong, (fish and game) also might call the FAA and see if there are any regs concerning flying over the pipe line. hope you see lots big ones as I have a permit up there as well. good luck

  4. #4
    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Default F&G says...

    Fish and Game said "check with Aleyeska", they see no prob with it as long as I don't hunt that day and I'm not aiding others on the ground while they are hunting. When I talked to the lady at Alyeska...she said I need a permit for my ATV??????.....................Huh????.....First of all I wasn't inquiring about an ATV, and secondly, its illegal to ride one on the haul road along the corridor...I know you do need a permit if you ride along the pipeline, behind Eielson etc, etc...

    I guess just do it, is the answer I'm getting...of all the years I've hunted the corridor on the Haul road, I've seen a few planes do it.

    Now what about landing at the airstrips along the haul road?...I know theres a few, and know where they are, to include the ones at the pump stations, and at the DOT stations, can anyone land there? Remember, I won't be hunting, just looking. Will be taking some fuel with us, just want to land for refuel and lunch, and stretch the legs out......

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    As far as the FAA goes I believe the reg. states you must be no closer than 500 feet to persons or property. That would mean no lower than 500 feet above it, or 500 feet horizontal if you're flying on the deck. There are patrol helicopters flying the pipeline on a regular basis so it would be wise to keep an eye out and listen and make frequent position reports on ctaf....Louis
    Louis Knapp

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Louis View Post
    As far as the FAA goes I believe the reg. states you must be no closer than 500 feet to persons or property. That would mean no lower than 500 feet above it, or 500 feet horizontal if you're flying on the deck. There are patrol helicopters flying the pipeline on a regular basis so it would be wise to keep an eye out and listen and make frequent position reports on ctaf....Louis

    I know the regulations, I even have the 2010 FAR AIM book...I know they patrol it, we don't plan on flying directly above it, just in vicinity.

    Do you know anything about the landing strips? I'm gonna call Aleyeska again later and talk to someone sensible about pump station 5 landing strip near Gobblers Knob and a few others...

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    Fish and game come up with rules. State troopers are the ones to enforce the laws written by Fish and Game. Might be a good start. Heck just fly it, what are they going to do pull you over.

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    Member bushrat's Avatar
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    If I understand it right, kaha, plan is to scout for moose from the air two or three days before driving up? Would seem a vast waste of time and money to me unless you are more interested in getting a lay of the land from on high on places to hike into because any bull moose you do see likely will have moved significantly in a few (or more) days.

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    Kaha...it is legal. Flying is always fun.
    But many of us here on the forum have always considered you to be a kick-butt tough hunter who would do what you do with brains, sweat, good optics and your muscles.
    Are you suggesting that you are going to become an "airplane hunter". If so, don't forget your GPS so you can isolate and pinpoint the exact location of those early season bachalor bulls.
    I would rather view you as the kick-butt tough guy I have previously read about in your posts.

    Dennis

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    I did not read where Kahahawai said he was going to scout the area by air and drive back to hunt in two or three days. Even if he did, depending on the time of the year, location, age and sex of moose they will be in same location for several days.

    I hope this does not turn into ant-airplane hunting bashing.

  11. #11

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    I did not read where Kahahawai said he was going to scout the area by air and drive back to hunt in two or three days. Even if he did, depending on the time of the year, location, age and sex of moose they will be in same location for several days.

    I hope this does not turn into ant-airplane hunting bashing.
    Yup...most know that sometimes there are mile and miles of....well, miles and miles. Then there are pockets of Moose. Knowing where these pockets are will increase your kill rate tremendously. But some like to get out for the "experience" rather than the kill. I have no problem with these folks doing that, if that is what they want. Everyone has different reasons for what we do. As I see it, there is no better way in the world to find these pockets, than from the air. I have learned more about the terrain, animal concentrations and animal behavior in a couple hours in a cub vs years on the ground. Ever wonder why F&G uses cubs and choppers for their studies?

    Too late....it already has!!!
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    SF50 prevents over harvest I have 0 problem w/ an honest scouting trip to get the lay of the land and actually verify the presence of moose in an area. The thing that drives me nuts is the constant circling of animals while I am right there on the ground ACTUALLY HUNTING them. I have had a couple stalks blown in unit 14 because of this behavior.

    I certainly never believed that Kaha didn't fly the mountains any to find some of his sheep spots, I sincerely doubt that he just paid a pilot to drop him off at an off the cuff strip in the mountains then hiked into a random valley picked off of a topo map. He has more than proven that he will walk MILES from a strip into brutal country to get it done. His "Man card" is in no danger of being revoked any time soon.

  13. #13
    jwolf
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    Well, to my knowledge, which is limited, aerial scouting for anything is dependent on various and numerous factors Ė weather being one of them.. Are they bedded down in the brush? Will they move around? Iíve always been under the impression that aerial scouting is generally designated for sheep.. Not moose.. Education anyone?
    It would seem that you could miss a great deal of moose if they are holding up and bedded down and the whole ordeal would prove fruitless. But..Thatís just my undereducated opinion..
    All that I could add is that Iím use to traveling the back country horseback and by doing so I curse one thing.. Thatís how much I MISS by NOT being afoot. Five feet off the ground and moving at an average of 2.4 mph has its disadvantages.. Imagine what you miss 100 feet in the air at cruising speed..

    Quote Originally Posted by Rutting Moose View Post
    I did not read where Kahahawai said he was going to scout the area by air and drive back to hunt in two or three days. Even if he did, depending on the time of the year, location, age and sex of moose they will be in same location for several days.

    I hope this does not turn into ant-airplane hunting bashing.

  14. #14
    jwolf
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    Oh boy, well, in my truthful opinion I have to add.. If youíre a professional outfitter and your livelihood is dependent upon scoring that legal animal or you really need or want freezer meat than spotting via aircraft could get you a leg up (not necessarily moose) or anything for that matter.. but.. I canít see how in the heck anyone could call themselves a ďhunterĒ or moreover trophy hunter in this game-rich environment if they canít adequately hunt this environment without the use of an airplane to spot from.. I mean serious, you canít track from an airplane, you canít find out what a critter is eating from an airplane, shoot, you canít even get an idea of herd dynamics or anything else from an airplane.. So, if youíre a hunter.. you should have an understanding of all the previous right? If a person understood all mentioned than it seems he would have a HUGE leg up over anyone simply spotting from an airplane..
    Just a weird little thought!

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    Member kahahawai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AlaskaTrueAdventure View Post
    Kaha...it is legal. Flying is always fun.
    But many of us here on the forum have always considered you to be a kick-butt tough hunter who would do what you do with brains, sweat, good optics and your muscles.
    Are you suggesting that you are going to become an "airplane hunter". If so, don't forget your GPS so you can isolate and pinpoint the exact location of those early season bachalor bulls.
    I would rather view you as the kick-butt tough guy I have previously read about in your posts.

    Dennis
    Dennis, you are making feel bad now...but what Mark (bushrat) says is right I'm trying to get some understanding of the area because the DM 922 area is so Vast!!! I am mainly interested in the area west of the Hwy torwards Kanuti Flats, I want to know what its like behind those hills, and have noticed its very thick brush, I have seen a couple of airboats go up in there, and want to see what I will have to compete with, if its even worth hiking in and burning up a few days. Unlike DM920 that area borders National park and preserve, and substantially smaller area. I'd just thought it would save time, rather than driving up there a couple weekends....as many times I have been up there, I am more familiar with the country north of Coldfoot ,and north of Atigun.

    Chuck

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    Member AlaskaTrueAdventure's Avatar
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    Well, KAHA, I believe you will be able to get over whatever regret you might experience....

    Concerning early season moose movements...and I'm sure other will have some similar or differing experiences...

    Way out yonder in western Alaska, bull moose do not do much moving during the many years I have observed them during the last few days of August and the first few days of September. When I have viewed a bull from a HILLTOP LOOKOUT on Aug 28th or on Sep 2nd, that bull will often be in the same area or only 1/4 mile away for a few days.

    But on Sept 5th or 6th their minds and hooves begin to wander, chasing the finer things in life. When I have spotted a bull after Sept 6th, and not been able to whack him out, I generally never see that guy again. Note that this need to wonder and chase the cows just happens to coincide with opening day of moose season for my nonresident client-hunters in western Alaska.

    ...just my observations....And yes I do regularly use aircraft for access to the areas I hunt both professionally and personally. And yes, on rare occasions I have glanced down at the ground and observed not only flora but also fauna. But honestly, I'm usually just looking for obstructions in whatever river I'm gonna be rafting/hunting. Really really.

    Happy July 4th!

    Dennis

  17. #17

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    Chuck - have you made contact with the flight company servicing the Aleyska flight patrol contract? I'm sure they would have the 411.
    Alaska Outdoors Television ~ Outdoor Channel

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    Default restrictions

    If there was a lawful restriction, it would be in the AK supp, sectionals, and/or NOTAM system. Heck it would probably be a TFR these days. Your pilot friend probably has (should have) already checked these sources. Enjoy your flight.

  19. #19
    New member akhunter02's Avatar
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    Default moose

    shoot me a pm and can offer some assistance

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    Quote Originally Posted by bushrat View Post
    If I understand it right, kaha, plan is to scout for moose from the air two or three days before driving up? Would seem a vast waste of time and money to me unless you are more interested in getting a lay of the land from on high on places to hike into because any bull moose you do see likely will have moved significantly in a few (or more) days.
    Agree with you on that one. An airplane flying around 500 feet from an area that holds moose, would only drive them away from there.

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