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Thread: Octopus Recipe?

  1. #1
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    Default Octopus Recipe?

    Does anyone have a recipe/technique for octopus? I keep getting them in the shrimp pots and while they make great halibut bait, I can only use so much. I had octopus in a restaurant the other day and it was excellent. My one attempt at cooking one didn't turn out well.

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    Member Ak Bird Brain's Avatar
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    I got one the other day myself, nice 2 1/2 foot long arms. I've spoken with a few people on how to prepare it. They have both said the same thing. Slice the tenticles into thin rounds and pound the heck out of it with a meat mallet. When your done beating it it should have spread out and thined down quite a bit. Rub it with bread crumbs and pan fry for just a couple of seconds on each side like you would do clams. I haven't got around to trying it yet so I hope someone comes along to correct me if I'm wrong.
    Give a man a fish and you feed him for a day,
    Teach a man to fish and he'll also learn to drink, lie, and avoid the honey do list.

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    Thanks, I'll give that one a try.

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    Talking Teriaki Octo

    I love octopus prepared like this: First Blanch the outside with hot water. This takes away the slime and let you skin it easily. next cut up the meat, mantel and all. Pound the living heck out of it and soak in teriaki sauce. Barbaque hot and fast. Don't over cook. A word of advice is to not invite your friends for the first 20 times so you get some.

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    It's the whole "blanching" thing I think I screwed up. How long do you blanche?

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    Blanching usually just requires that the item being scalded is dropped into boiling water just long enough to mildly cook/break down the cell structure of the outer skin, epidermis (spelling??), etc., of what ever is being prepared. A metal strainer works well when working with meats or items that aren't uniform in shape, or are small in size.

    Once prepped for final cooking, it can be made similarly to squid, in which case either a Szechuan or Thai recipe, with bell peppers, carrots, sweet onions, perhaps basil, garlic, freshly prepared ginger, olive oil, and chili pepper sauce of one variety or another is nice. If cooking Thai style, either a small amount of white sugar or substitute, a bit of either lime juice or kaffir lime leaves, and even a touch of coconut milk and/or peanuts, cashews, or (??) can be added. Don't over-do the lime or the sugar/sweetener.

    A touch of Thai red pepper paste and some freshly sliced jalapenos or dried asian red peppers will give it the amount of 'zing' you desire, if any at all.

    I tend to add the spices etc. to the meat in advance, and with meats that take notably longer to cook than the veggies, add the meat to the wok first, then the veggies.

    With seafoods and other items that cook very fast, however, you can either cook the meats entirely separately from the veggies, or add them all at once. Your choice.

    Serve over plump, short-grain brown rice or the rice of your choice.

    Or, once boiled/cooked without veggies, you can make some awesome sushi with it, as I don't recall eating octopus raw in sushi, though others may do this..

  7. #7
    Member grcg's Avatar
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    Default mmmmm....thai

    Siam Cuisine in Fairbanks has a fabulous squid dish....I bet that Thai octopus is awesome.

    ...sorry...don't have the recipe...

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    I don't run shrimp pots and have never hooked an octopus when fishing for halibut but I have friends who have. I wonder how do you kill one of those things? I have heard that they stick to the side of the boat or scurry to a corner of the boat etc. so it seems like it would be a chore to kill one for butchering.

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    easiest way i've found to cook them is in a pressure cooker. gut them..depending on size of cooker put the octo or a few legs at a time in a pot inside pressure cooker... maybe an inch of water in cooker, put the lid on, and the weight on 10 lb setting right from the start. no venting necessary. when the weight starts chattering time for 10 of 15 mins. might have to experiment with the time for desired doneness. let cool and you can slide the skin and suckers right off and then prepare or freeze the meat.

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    I've seen the monster octopus come off AK boats. Legs 2-3" in diameter! For prep and cooking freeze it first to get it tender, no pounding necessary later on. Clean by reversing the mantle and pulling out the guts, be careful with the sharp beak just inside the mouth where the tentacles meet. Massage and rinse with salt several times to get rid of slime. Pour enough olive oil to cover bottom of large pot w cover. On highest heat setting, sear and cook. Turn to avoid burning flesh. Should be done when flesh begins to curl. Steaming also works well. Make thin diagonal slices and serve with lemon-soy sauce or grated ginger-soy sauce. (I confess that in weaker moments during my younger days, I used octopus as bait!)

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    Make octopus ceviche. There are lots of ceviche recipes online, but basically they all call for "cooking" the octopus (or fish) with the juice of a citrus fruit, usually lemon or lime. Once you've had it this way, you'll want to make it every time you get a fresh octopus. We used to get them on the boats on the Bering Sea all the time and one of the crew from Mexico on one boat knew how to make ceviche. The stuff is excellent.

    The other nice thing to do with it is to make California rolls, especially if you have some good smoked roe to put on them. Just cook the octopus briefly, cut in strips, add sticky white rice, and roll the stuff up in a sheet of seaweed. Sagaya sells a bunch of different types of seaweed. Slice the roll into one inch sections, top with roe, add a slice of pickled ginger, a bit of wasabi, and soy sauce to taste. Deeeelish.

    (Some guys on boats think it's also quite funny if you throw an octopus on the back of someone who's wearing a Grundens rain jacket. Usually the octopus can't bite through the fabric, and it can be interesting watching someone try to get the thing off. Of course, it's not unheard of for there to be a bit of a scuffle between the victim and perpetrator afterward....)

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    clean and pound the octo with a rolling pin or whatever you may have till it becomes more plyable.place tenticle into a vacum seal bag with nice olive oila pinch of sea salt,pepper,tyme. Seal up and place in a steamer for 10+ hours.at 76 degrees slow and low will break down the tissue so it does not become rubber.when done quickly chill in ice bath still inside the bag! Do not open bag and place directly in the water!.when chilled
    slice octo on a bias too get nice rounds out of the tenticle. Add too a homemade rich tomato sauce,with piccolinni olives,minced capers,and very thin sliced roasted thai chili if you like a bit of spice,very thin! And if going simple toss with angel hair pasta or if you make your own pasta and want to impress a lady make your pasta with a lil bit of the ink from the octo and you will get a beutiful black pasta noodle with the bright red sauce and pink octo..it will look nice

  13. #13
    Member Phish Finder's Avatar
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    Next time you come to Anchorage, head to New Sagaya on Old Seward and pick up a container of Tako Sansai.

    The trick to octopus is to slice it very thin. I like to get the skin off of the tentacles first, then quick saute with something acidic.

    It can't be beat when prepared properly.


    Yummy!!!

    Tako is Japanese for octopus. Doing an internet search for Tako recipes will yield more than you can imagine. Sesame oil, sake, and ginger are great additions, as well as a touch of mirin and rice vinegar.
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