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Thread: Chugach transportation options?

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    Default Chugach transportation options?

    So I fly into Anchorage and plan on going to Chugach (Crow pass trail) for my vacation. Transportation to and from? Railroad? Taxi?

    Alaskan Rail goes to Girdwood and then how far is the park from the rail station? Are there any taxi services in Girdwood? Or should I just take a taxi from the Anc airport?

    Or does someone want to make some $$ to and from?

    Any advice (other than rental car, can't see the money for it just to sit there at $10 a day for parking) for transportation options would be appreciated.

    Thanks

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    Have you considered hitching? I also plan to hike that trail sometime in July or August. I was planning on hitching from Anchorage to Girdwood and then Eagle River back to Anchorage. Locals seemed to think that wouldn't be an issue at all...in fact there is only one road out of Anchorage to Girdwood and not much in between...just a thought. I know I will also be doing hitching when I head up to Denali...kind of just seems the way to get around as a backpacker in Alaska...

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Taxi would be very expensive, there are shuttle services in addition to the train and taxis. Do some googling or call the Alyeska Prince Hotel and ask them to recomend some shuttles from the airport to Girdwood.

    Have you considered how you're going to get from the ER nature center back to town?

    Hitchhiking is probably your best bet from Girdwood to the trailhead, and from the ER nature center back into town.

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    I have almost the same question as above: how to access the Crow pass trailheads without a car. I might have a rental car that I would leave at one of the trailheads, but how could I get back there? I'm not hitchhking at all (female, solo).
    Any ideas? Would probably be towards the end of August.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Northcrazy View Post
    I have almost the same question as above: how to access the Crow pass trailheads without a car. I might have a rental car that I would leave at one of the trailheads, but how could I get back there? I'm not hitchhking at all (female, solo).
    Any ideas? Would probably be towards the end of August.
    Park your car at the Eagle River visitor's center and get a friend to drive you to Girdwood?

    I always hiked with someone else, so we had two cars and made it work.
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EagleRiverDee View Post
    Park your car at the Eagle River visitor's center and get a friend to drive you to Girdwood?

    I always hiked with someone else, so we had two cars and made it work.
    Thanks, but the thing is that I'm hiking (and travelling) on my own. So in a case like this (walking from A to B) I really do depend on whatever kind of public transport.

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Unless you can befriend a local to either drop you off or pick you up, you're going to have to hire someone to drive you to one end or the other. The Eagle River end is about 10 miles from the closest bus stop. I don't believe there is any public transportation to Girdwood, though their might be shuttle that you could take to town or the hotel, but that would still be ~10 miles from the trailhead.

    While the hike might be "only" 24 miles, the drive from trailhead to trailhead is more like 80 miles.

    Unfotunately their are no good, easy or inexspensive options.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Thanks for your reply as well. I already suspected it to be that way after some research on the net, but still hoped that maybe someone here might have some "insider information".
    Well, I'm going to think about it and possibly choose some other trail instead. After all, there's enough more nice places to go for a hike in Alaska. (and I have not seen many of them yet, so...)

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    Head down to Sterling and rent a canoe for a few days, there cheap and you can leave your car there .

    edit : Oh nevermind , just seen your not renting a car .
    Alaska bound !

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    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    Here's a great resource to find out about trails in the state: http://www.alaskahikesearch.com/

    Something to consider would be depending on the length of your trip is to fly into Anchorage and take a shuttle to Girdwood. Check out the link to the Girdwood trail map http://www.alyeskaresort.com/events-...-trekking.aspx

    As far as Crow Pass, honestly the most scenic part of the trail is from Girdwood to the river crossing. So if you can't work out the transportation on both ends, hiking from the Girdwood side to the river and looping back to Girdgwood would be an outstanding hike. Sure it's nice to say you've done the whole through hike, but having done the hike I could certainly pass up the Eagle River to the nature center portion of the trail.
    Those that are successful in Alaska are those who are flexible, and allow the reality of life in Alaska to shape their dreams, vs. trying to force their dreams on the reality of Alaska.

    If you have a tenuous grasp of reality, Alaska is not for you.

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    Thanks a lot. I already knew the first link, but not the second one.
    Walking only part of the trail and come back is actually an option I had already considered, so thanks for the information that the southern part is more interesting.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul H View Post

    As far as Crow Pass, honestly the most scenic part of the trail is from Girdwood to the river crossing. So if you can't work out the transportation on both ends, hiking from the Girdwood side to the river and looping back to Girdgwood would be an outstanding hike. Sure it's nice to say you've done the whole through hike, but having done the hike I could certainly pass up the Eagle River to the nature center portion of the trail.
    This is actually true. And if you hit it at the right time, the entire valley will be in flower and it looks like something right out of "Field Of Dreams".
    "If snowmachiners would adopt the habits of riding one at a time and not parking at the base of avalanche prone slopes, the number of fatalities would likely be whittled by at least a third, if not by half." ~ Jill Fredston, in the book Snowstruck, In The Grip Of Avalanches.

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