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Thread: The horriblest Question. What is the easiest way???

  1. #1
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    Default The horriblest Question. What is the easiest way???

    But, I'll settle for ANY way that works, OK.)

    The easiest way to lube your patches or patching material, (Strips).

    If I'm using spit patches, I spray on a solution, like maybe some water with some detergent/soap, and that works fine, for the short haul.

    When I put on something like lard, or bear grease, or stuff like that I heat it first, and it soaks into the patching material, but it's really too thick. Then I hafta try and squeeze it/ring it out. I have taken a strip that was lubed/greased, and put another untreated one with it and rolled them up together, then squeezed them so the excess in the one soaks into the other one.

    Anyway, I like lubed patches but I wish I hadda a BETTER WAY, to get the lube on them.

    Every time I've asked this question before, not on an Internet Forum, but just people I know, I've not gotten an answer. I'm thinkin, maybe, no-one likes to answer this question, and from all that I know now, I can understand why.

    I just bought TWO YARDS, of that blue and white Ticking Material. I got some lubbin to do. Help me out here.

    Any Takers on this?

    Thanks
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  2. #2

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    I once bought a couple hundred of the Oxyoke patches by mistake that weren't lubed. At the advice of an old long time musket shooter I put a hundred of them in a big pill bottle and filled it with veggy oil and let it soak over night. Then I tuned it upside down and left the excess run out. They worked fine except for the oily spot on my britches leg where I kept wiping my fingers!

  3. #3

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    Moose milk(water soluble machine oil), hoppes #9, H202 (hydrogen peroxide) works well for me. Pre cut patches, dampen and store in percussion cap tin's or any plastic container,film cannister, pill vial etc. Use the same solution to swab your barrel by spraying on cleaning patches. Some individuals use windex, others use window washing solution and some just use plain ole water rather than the peroxide. I've even seen some throw in some rubbing alcohol in the belief that it helps dry the bore faster after swabbing but if you use a clean dry patch it's not necessary.
    Saliva (spit patching) is great for range shooting but long term, ie: all day carry will facilitate a rust ring in your breech area. Probably, the best patch lube I ever got my hands on was pure bear oil but it's hard to come by down here. The old timers supposedly used a mixture of sheep lard and bear or whale oil with whale oil the preferred oil. Whatever you use do not use petroleum based lubes unless you really like cleaning out bore carbon and burning patches.

  4. #4

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    I use strips about 90% of the time, but I lube them "one at a time" from a tin. Before you grind your teeth, I'm not loading them into the bore, but into a loading block. Just lube and load into the block, then cut. I even use the blocks at the range. When they're empty, I refill them and go back to shooting.

    When I'm lubing whole strips, I generally roll the strips, then put them in a ziploc with lube and stick them in the microwave for about 30 seconds to really melt the lube, then let it soak in. If the lube is stiffer, it wont soak all the way in, so I nuke it again once it cools. A couple or three treatments is usually enough. Then I unroll them, and if I didn't get enough lube in, I roll them the other way with the drier part out and do it all again. If I get too much, I just stick the ziploc in hot water to make it all soft again but not too hot, then "squeegie" the excess off between two fingers.

    I think the big reason I don't do more of that is that it sure seems to "waste" a lot of lube compared to lubing them one at a time just before I seat and cut at the muzzle or the loading block, as the case may be. But it's sure nice to have a few pre-lubed strips around rather than fumbling with that tin in cold weather.

  5. #5
    Member Scott in AK's Avatar
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    Default

    Brown Bear
    I to like mine in strips.
    What I do is to tear into strips, the roll them up snug but not to tight.
    Then i set the rolls standing up into a coffee can and put a homemade lube into the can and set it on the woodstove for a bit.
    The lube will soak up into the rolls, this way the ticking only takes up what it will hold.
    when the ticking has absorbed the lube I pull them out of the melted lube
    and set them on a cookie sheet to cool.

    I do use a homemade lube, I like a little stiffer lube so there is none to drip out.

    You can play with how tight you roll the ticking to adjust how much lube it picks up

    lube
    4 parts raw bees wax
    1 part Jojaba oil, this is a wax based, plant seed oil, can be found at health food store, it is chemically very close to spermaceti oil
    and 1/8 part lanolin, also found at the health food store.

    this is what I use for my cast bullets, I just thin a bit with the oil for my ML's

    I take a bit and add more lanolin and the wife LOVES it for her hands, works for dry skin and chaped lips too.

    Scott
    He who tries to tread on me
    will find himself in misery
    and this I promise faithfully
    upon my fathers name

  6. #6
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    Default

    I PERCEIVE what I've been missing, for doing it right.

    I didn't think of leaving the patches or strips in a closed container and letting them soak. I've been in too beeg ofa hurry, I reckon.

    jmckenny:
    I know a guy who uses Windshield Washer fluid. I've had patches get stiff/freeze after they were sprayed with water on the bench, when I was shooting in cold weather. I'm not sure if he does it for that reason, though. I'll ask him next time I see'em.

    EKC:
    Why didn't I think of that? I'm gonna do some that way, right away. Thanks.

    Scott:
    I'm gonna try something on the same order of the way you do it. Thanks.

    BB:
    A lot of it IS wasted when you lube STRIPS, I make them a bit wider than neccessary, and stagger the balls a bit, one side then the other, which seems to result in a few more patches, and a little less waste of both material and lube.

    I've got ONE loading block. I've never used it hardly at all.
    Mine has 6 holes in two rows. I'm thinking a single row block would be best, but ???? Waddaya think?

    I know you make your own.
    What size drill bit for 50 Cal.,
    and how thick is the wood you use?
    and do you need HARD wood?
    Take yer time. Thanks.

    Thanks Everyone. The info sounds promising.

    If I could shoot better I'd be uhhh,,,, Better Shot.
    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  7. #7

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    I've got ONE loading block. I've never used it hardly at all.
    Mine has 6 holes in two rows. I'm thinking a single row block would be best, but ???? Waddaya think?

    I know you make your own.
    What size drill bit for 50 Cal.,
    and how thick is the wood you use?
    and do you need HARD wood?
    Take yer time. Thanks.
    I use different sizes for different "jobs" and rifles. For my big game rifles I use blocks with 2 or 3 holes, mostly because they get heavy and I'm not likely to need even one backup shot. But for small game hunting I make up blocks that hold 6, then I carry two or three spares, especially for those fumbley little 32 and 36 cal balls and patches. What a boon for cold weather!

    I use my benchtop sander to adjust the thickness of mine so they match ball diameter. That way when I seat them with the bottom of the ball protruding a little the tops will be just below the surface and ready for a swipe of the knife to cut the patching. The ball protruding below the surface is really handy for "feeling" to find the bore and align easily.

    I've used whatever wood is handy, ranging from scrap fir or pine to fancy hardwood. I turn them out real fast, so you might guess I've got a bunch of them rattling around (a whole 3-pound coffee can full, as a matter of fact).

    Here is a handy chart of drill bit sizes for different calibers of loading blocks. I'm not sure you can get all the way to that page without registering (free), so here are the bits for the calibers I use: 32 cal = 21/64", 36 cal = 3/8", 45 cal = 29/64", 50 cal = 1/2", 54 cal = 35/64", 58 cal = 19/32", 62 cal = 5/8", and 75 cal = 3/4"

    Some of those are slightly tight, depending on the wood fiber and might require light sanding. You want them a little tight to keep the balls from slipping out in casual banging around. I like to break the edge on the top of each hole for ease of starting balls when I load the block. It doesn't have to be a full "counter sink," but rounding the edge slightly is a plus. Whether or not I put finish on the block, I reach inside each hole and give it a good soaking with my patch lube so dry wood doesn't soak lube out of my patches once I start using the blocks and letting the balls sit in there for days or months.

    The blocks are fun to make, and you can get as fancy or simple as you want decorating or using different shapes and hole layouts along with fancy wood. I saw one like a bear track with a ball at each toe, and another shaped like a crescent moon with 4 balls scattered along it. I always put a hole in one end of mine for hanging them on a cord if I want, but that's only for hunts rather than the range. BTW- back to your question that started all this- I like single rows for ease of handling by feel.

    Have fun, but be careful. They're addictive to create!

  8. #8
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    Default

    BB:
    You've got Loading Blocks down to a Science.

    Thanks ever so much for the USEFUL information.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  9. #9
    Member homerdave's Avatar
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    Default here's a chart for RB loading blocks...

    hope this works...
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Alaska Board of Game 2015 tour... "Kicking the can down the road"
    http://www.alaskabackcountryhunters.org/

  10. #10
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    Thank You homerdave:

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  11. #11
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    Default Problem Solved

    Wal, here be the latest skinny on my Patch Strip lubing.

    First, I tried the EKCs method, but not with cut patches. Instead, I use a strip of material that was rolled up. I put it into a small plastic container that had a lid with a judged amount of my self-rendered LARD, from a REEL PEEG, and Nuked it. I put it one end down, and it soaked up the lard right away and I turned it over. SUCCESS.

    Later I tried Scott's Coffee Can Method. (He didn't specify what brand, so I just used a Yuban Can. (That doesn't mean I'm endorsing that kinda Coffee, OR, objecting to it.)

    Any O Hoo, I rolled up 8 more strips, 2 to a roll, and put them in the can with some Lard, and heated it on the stove. The rolls soaked up the lard, like no-bodies business. I hadda keep adding lard. I turned them over, etc. Finally, I figgered I had enough, so I covered the can and let it soak and cool.

    They look good, and tommorrow I'll unroll some and see if the rolls are lubed all the way through. I'll keep'em in ZipLock bags.

    It looks like I won't hafta worrry about a patch shortage for a long while. I'd better stock up on powder and ball though.

    It seems that heat causes the washed cotton to soak up the lube, and having it rolled up, or together like that, keeps it from getting too thick and messy.

    I dunno how long it would have taken me to figger that out myself, so Thanks All, for the idea.

    BB:
    I aint' made me no loading blocks, yet, that is. I have one already, pre-made that I bought, but I have a 1/2 inch bit, so I'll be making some.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

  12. #12

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    A little tip on making and using wooden loading blocks: Wood will absorb lube so seal the wood well. Secondly, once you have bored the proper size hole for caliber use a small round wood file and make some small petal like relief cuts around the perimeter of the hole. This will prevent the lube from being squeezed out of the patching material or absorbed by the wood.

  13. #13
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    Thanks for the TIP, jc.

    Smitty of the North
    Walk Slow, and Drink a Lotta Water.
    Has it ever occurred to you, that Nothing ever occurs to God? Adrien Rodgers.
    You can't out-give God.

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