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Thread: Cracked Stock

  1. #1
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    Default Cracked Stock

    So, my grandpa is in his late 80's and he gave me his rifle last year. It's a pretty sweet custom 7mm, and I like it alot. The only problem is there is a pretty good crack in the stock that I'm concerned about. I was thinking about filling it with some CA glue of some kind. I've heard alot of bowyers talking about using Locktite 440 I think it is to fill cracks like this one. I thought about trying to find a new stock for it, but this one is really nice looking and has some sentimental value to me, so if I could save it over finding a new one, that's what I would like to do. I'm just afraid I will end up comming off the mountain some day with a two piece rifle. The other thing is the condition of the blueing, and in the next few years I would like to address that issue.


    Any thoughts?

    You can actually see the crack in this pic, it's just forward from the bolt.
    Last edited by beauhunter; 06-23-2010 at 10:31. Reason: add pic
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  2. #2

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    Superglue, as you suggested, is used by a lot of Garand shooters to fix small cracks in stocks. Smaller cracks suck in enough glue to make a difference and you can use some unwaxed dental floss to work the glue into a bigger crack.

    I couldn't see the crack in your picture (I'm outside with a laptop and lots of glare) but if the crack is in the thin area next to the magazine I would try the superglue. If the crack is in the recoil lug area I might try to drill (through the mag well area) and pin the crack if I could get to it.

    Good luck!

  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    I would not use superglue. It doesn't have any structural strength. Go with a two part epoxy like the old Acra-glas instead. You'll have a much stronger repair.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Acra-glas and a few pins.Might just as well do it right. Gorilla glue is good but extra clean up for refinish of the area
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Put it up on the gun rack and enjoy it Beau, you don't look right carrying around a rifle anyway.

    By-the-way, what did you end up doing with that nanny you murdered?

  6. #6
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    Default

    After you repair the stock you might want to get a synthetic one to use while actually hunting - lighter, stronger, stable in inclement weather.

  7. #7

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    Skip the goat, provide a better pic of the stock.Serious stock cracks are always related to recoil absorption.

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    Default thanks guys.

    Thanks for the input I appreciate it. I'm not much of a gun dude myself. Infact I'm really a pretty poor rifle shot. I called a local gunsmith and asked him to stop by the shop today to take a look at it.

    I ended up making a rug out of the nanny I shot, turned out really good since there wasn't the slightest hole in the hide.

    Thanks again,
    Beau
    Alpine is awesome...

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    Default Pics







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    Member Big Al's Avatar
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    I have made many repairs and would never use anything but a two part epoxy for the repair. I used to use accu-glass as suggested before but have switched over to Marie-Tex. What I like to do now is wet out both sides with the glass and then fill the entire crack and wrap the cracked area with surgical tubing to tighten the crack and let cure for 24 hours at room temperature before I remove the tubing. After the repair I sand and finish to match the remainder of the stock. As far as bluing goes I would do a Rust blue. Learn all you can about doing it yourself. It is by far better for a long lasting finish and you can learn to do it yourself. Not a lot of money can give you a first class finish.
    "The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tryants." (Thomas Jefferson

  11. #11
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    Thats almost past crack. Get a pin kit from Brownells when you get the acra-glas. That area is worst than a wrist break to fix. You for sure want to bed the recoil lugs/areas durning the fix and maybe a recoil bolt. The crack is following the grain perfect.
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  12. #12
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    It can be glued up with acra-glas epoxy. Be sure to work the epoxy into the crack well, then use a padded bar clamp or two to press it together. Let it cure for 24 hours then clean it up. The old mossberg rifle will still shoot fine after that. You only need to bed it if A: it doesn't shoot well. B: The action is impacting the wood and breaking it out. C: You feel the need to bed it. Other than that, run it. That crack is probably from yhe rifle being dropped or crushed behind a pickup seat. Good luck!
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by beauhunter View Post
    So, my grandpa is in his late 80's and he gave me his rifle last year. .

    Any thoughts?
    My thought would be have a gunsmith do the repair. It is a straightforward fix and can be done as gunbugs & Big Al suggest, but learning to do this on a sentimental (irreplaceable) rifle is not a good idea IMO. Take it to a competent gunsmith and have it done. Yeah it'll cost more money now, but I can't imagine that in the years to come that you would think it poorly spent. If this repair is well done it will hardly be visible and it will be stronger than before. Improperly done neither of these things will be true.

    Nice goat.

  14. #14
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    Beau:

    I found a used Remington 721 stock on ebay for Micah's Remington 721 300H&H he got from his Grandpa. His also had a cracked stock. The one I found was identical to the old one.(except for the crack) I think I payed $30.00 for it about 5-6 years ago.

    You might go that route or even try Gunbrokers.

  15. #15
    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    I'm retired and won't work for money but if you can get it 70 miles to Wrangell with a small acra-glas kit and brownells stock pin kit I'll fix it and you do the refinish. I'll point up what checkering needs it but from pics it looks 16 or 18 lpi
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

  16. #16
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    Default You were a good enough shot to bag that goat.

    You'll get better, the more you practice. Grandpa will be proud of ya.

    I'd probably do what I Cor. says. Fix, rather than replace, the stock.

    I wouldn't know how to get the glue or epoxy, accu glass, whatever into the crack.

    How do you do that guys?

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  17. #17
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    Amigo Will is right on the money. That crack follows the grain and acraglas or epoxy without the pin kit won't take care of it. I'd take him up on his offer!

  18. #18
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    Before cleaning the outside of varnish, squeeze the stock together so nothing gets into the crack.

    Squeeze the crack together, use the suggested pins or real small #4 machine screws laid across the crack on the inside to hold the sides together. I would also use a small chisel to make troughs for the screws to lay into so they don't project into the mortise.
    When ready to epoxy the crack, allow it to open, and even use a small block of wood to gently open the crack (not lengthen it), a little. If you do not have a syringe to inject the epoxy, you drill a small hole into the crack from the inside (don't go all the way through), and use the drill bit to pump epoxy into the crack.
    I used 10-12 small screws and quite a bit of epoxy to save my .500 stock when it developed a crack. You can see how badly mine was crack, across the web, and alongside the rear mag box. In this pic, I had only just begun to get things set up. Yours will be easy.
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  19. #19
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    Epoxy by itself will work fine, that shouldn't require pins. Just glue it up and clamp it.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

  20. #20
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    Default Thanks guys

    I had a gunsmith come by and look yesterday and I sent it home with him. He noticed another area that needed to be pinned, and came up with a plan to do both repairs. I'll put up some pictures when I get it back. He didn't seem to think It was going to take very long.
    Alpine is awesome...

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