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Thread: Introduction to Canning Book(s)

  1. #1

    Default Introduction to Canning Book(s)

    I'm thinking about making the investment to start canning - veggies first and hopefully meat later. Can anyone recommend a beginner's book to canning?

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    Member thewhop2000's Avatar
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    Default Go to alaska university cooperative service

    Why buy a book when you and your state dollars have already paid for that information. here is another link for salmon
    http://www.scribd.com/doc/20186789/L...-Salmon-Recipe.
    If a dipnetter dips a fish and there is no one around to see/hear it, Did he really dip?

  3. #3

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    Here is a free online course put out by the extension service. Scroll down toward the bottom of the page.
    Chuck

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    get the ball blue book. cooperative extension has great information, but there is no replacement for having the ball blue book on your shelf in your kitchen.

    the CES online course is a great primer to get you started.

    Primary advice would be to get a large pressure cooker, not a small one. They are an investment that will pay dividends for years and years.

    I recommend buying a bunch of new jars because it is disappointing when you use old thrift store jars and they crack in the water bath. Once you buy new jars, only use them for canning and they will keep for years and years, but if you start using them for a lot of other things and then go to can with them they might break in the water bath and spoil your hard work.



    What are you thinking of canning? We've done a lot, such as tomatoes (and tomato sauce), salmon, moose, clams, pickled cucumbers and beets, apple sauce. The sky is the limit.

    Shop at the farmer's markets this fall with your canner in mind.

    I applaud your investment.

  5. #5

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    Andweav - that's what I've been told too - definitely going with a large pressure cooker. I didn't know that about jars so thanks for that. I'm taking the advice on here and doing some reading from the university and I will try to find the Ball book too. First things I'd like to can are tomatoes but working my way to canning salmon and moose if I'm successful. This fall we'll be packing up the "station wagon" and doing some berry picking so would like to make jar upon jar of jellies. But before all that I'm reading. Thanks for all the advice here. Once I get started I'll post my results and probably more questions. Thanks again.

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    from experience I do not think it is necessary to pressure cook berry preserves. Being that the preserves are well above 140 F while cooking, they will be quite sterile and there is really not as much concern with nasty stuff like botulism as there is with meats/fish and some veggies. Ladle hot preserves into jars (cleaned with boiling water), put on very clean lids/rings, and they will self seal when they cool. Have not had them go bad, my mother always did it this way, though you can water bath or pressure cook for peace of mind, which my wife often does.

    We also do apple sauce (local apples), sometimes with a sprinkle of cinnamon and always with a smidgin of AK honey, but be careful, you will never again approve of store bought apple sauce.

    You can use old jars with success, don't think brand new are essential, but as they sit around I end up on occasion storing nails/screws, pens, coins or whatever in them from time to time and I think this is what led to the breakage we had last year. Lost 4 cans of salmon out of a batch of 16 which made a mess in the cooker as well as causing general dissappointment. Now we have decided to designate a handful of jars for drinking, and misc. storage and the rest are canning specific and after the contents are consumed the jars are stored in the original packaging for canning reuse only.

    have fun. we are all learning, let us know what you try and how it goes.

    don't overfill your jars!

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    Arrow UAF canning info is gr8

    UAF puts out great info on this for free. Find the basics here:
    http://www.uaf.edu/files/ces/preserv...nty/index.html

    And here you can get some great (more advanced) ways to spice it up a bit:
    http://extension.uaf.edu/ces/publica.../FNH-00224.pdf

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