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Thread: 5005 marine grade aluminum?

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    Default 5005 marine grade aluminum?

    Can somebody please tell me why Alweld uses 5005 aluminum? I'm looking at maybe buying a 1652, but can't decide if going with the 5005 would be okay since about all of the other manufactures use 5052 and some 5086. I know I'm probably nit picking, but it just has me wondering WHY??

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    Most of the 5000 series Al alloys are sheet alloys, and can be used in marine applications. 5005 has less tensile strength (but not much) than the 5052 which is a very common hull material. Probably a bit cheaper, and still has adequate strength for a bot.
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    Cool Why 5005

    Alweld uses a 5005 grade aluminum which allows them to press the chines into the aluminum with a roller press. Many john boat manufactures use this technique. Lowe Crestliner and G3 for example.This grade is slightly softer and tends to dent before it cracks. It is quite durable and can last for many years.

    Woolridge uses a 5052 and Jetcraft uses a 5086, both grades are too hard for this process. This grade of aluminum, used in thicker sheets, allows for a more impact resistant hull.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Madboater View Post
    Alweld uses a 5005 grade aluminum which allows them to press the chines into the aluminum with a roller press. Many john boat manufactures use this technique. Lowe Crestliner and G3 for example.This grade is slightly softer and tends to dent before it cracks. It is quite durable and can last for many years.

    Woolridge uses a 5052 and Jetcraft uses a 5086, both grades are too hard for this process. This grade of aluminum, used in thicker sheets, allows for a more impact resistant hull.
    So in your opinion which would be the better material for jon boats? The trend seems to be 5052?

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    Anybody else care to take a stab at this??

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    I would say 5052 also, or 5086 for corrosion resistance
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    Quote Originally Posted by Madboater View Post
    Alweld uses a 5005 grade aluminum which allows them to press the chines into the aluminum with a roller press. Many john boat manufactures use this technique. Lowe Crestliner and G3 for example.This grade is slightly softer and tends to dent before it cracks. It is quite durable and can last for many years.

    Woolridge uses a 5052 and Jetcraft uses a 5086, both grades are too hard for this process. This grade of aluminum, used in thicker sheets, allows for a more impact resistant hull.
    Kinda curious about this as Wooldridge has several models w/ preformed ribs in the bottom?
    I would imagine these types of hulls with the ribs are rollformed?

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    Well this is what I've been told from boat manufactures. 5086 is very impact resitant, but harder so it can take a big impact, but also will crack faster. 5052 is softer than 5086 so it will dent easier and not crack as easy. 5005 is softer than the other two and for applications where you would be running in rocks you would want a dent than a crack. My problem is I've heard if you get hooks (dents) in the bottom of your hull, especially near cross braces or near the transom (which is worst) it effects the performane of your boat. Now there are some boat makers building their boats with the bracing running longitudinal instead of horizontal to pervent hooks in the bottom. It won't pervent one in the transom though. It just seems to me if you would be running a jet in shallow rocky water and used 5005 you would be beating alot of dents out of the boat, where if you went with 5052 it would kinda be the best of both worlds. Don't get me wrong I've seen the craftsmanship and quality of Alweld boats and would like to have one if I thought it wouldn't dent like crazy if I bumped a few rocks here and there.

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