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Thread: Brand new bow, busted cam

  1. #1
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    Default Brand new bow, busted cam

    The story:
    I just bought a brand new Alpine Frontier package from sportsmans, and the bow was... WAS fantastic. Mind you this is my first bow, but I know that you never dry fire. Unfortunately my bow decided to dry fire itself.

    I get home from work, excited to shoot my new bow, I nock an arrow and pull back the string. The arrow falls, and thus begins a series of unfortunate events. I naturally proceed to ease the string forward with great care and concern about the location of my finger in relation to the trigger of my Cobra release... when it falls. I'm not sure how it fell. Did it bump on my sleeve? Did I flick it by mistake? Did my brand new cobra release fail? All questions I've asked myself again and again, but the situation remains.

    I inspected the limbs and cams very carefully, and no obvious damage was noted so I nocked a new arrow and sent it down range. Everything was fine... for about fifty shots. Then I hear a distinctive pop.

    The problem:
    It is a one cam lovingly dubbed by Alpine as the Alpine Advantage One Cam (clever right). There is a tiny screw that holds the 2 pieces of the cam together (to adjust length of pull) that basically ripped out of the cam destroying the threaded hole it fits into. Here's the link with a picture, http://alpinearchery.com/advantage1cam.html. The white screw is the screw in question.

    The Question:
    So, is this fixable? Can I buy a new cam, have somebody patch it for me and who, or is my new bow a brand new $340 wall decoration?

    Any help would be appreciated. This kind of thing makes me sick to my stomach. "$340 is a lot of diapers" as my wife so lovingly put it.

  2. #2

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    If the cam is the only thing that's broken i'd take it back to Sportsmans and have them fix it or replace the bow.

  3. #3
    Member AKDoug's Avatar
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    Default

    The bow was dry fired. At a minimum I would replace the cam, strings and cables. I have a nice scar on my hand that came from a failed cable 100 shots after I dry fired a bow.

    Contact Alpine and be completely truthful. They will very likely get you a new cam and strings on the way for a discounted price, maybe even free.
    Bunny Boots and Bearcats: Utility Sled Mayhem

  4. #4
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    Default

    Very sorry to hear about your bad experience. Don't give up on archery as a result. Get some professional help, like maybe Paul at Archer's Den. He'll assist in getting you back up and running.

    However, I'd get that bow back to Sportsman's as soon as possible to see if they'll cover the obvious issues.

    Taylor

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  5. #5
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    Default Well, new developement.

    I took the bow back to Sportsmans, and found something very interesting. Granted I did dry fire the bow from about half draw, but that wasn't the problem. Once I got to sportsmans I asked to see the cams on all of the Alpine Frontier bows, and they all had the exact same problem. Seems like Alpine drilled two holes far too close to each other, and any amount of repetitive force on the cam (i.e. drawing to fire) will yank the bolt from the cam.

    Luckily my problem helped the archery guys at sportsmans identify 4 faulty bows that they pulled from their shelves. They also set me up with a much nicer PSE with a little discount that went a long way. I know if most people had the choice they would much rather shop at a mom and pop place than a chain, but if you had to shop at a chain Sportsmans will always take care of you.

  6. #6
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    But Jim Shockey said I could trust my life to an Alpine! What the??? Glad to hear Sportsmans took care of you. Which PSE did you end up with?

  7. #7
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    It's a PSE Sting NI I think. It was their package deal. By the time it was all said and done I got a $430 bow for about $400. Jim Shockey must get a fat check from Alpine. It seems like a great bow if they could re-work their cam system... and maybe try to reduce the felt recoil.

  8. #8
    Member Marc Taylor's Avatar
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    In a couple years you'll get tired of what you've got and you can then be done with adjustable-cam bows.

    It's a learning and evolution process. Or maybe a devolution if you go to a recurve or longbow, but worth the experience.

    My first two bows were package-bows. NOT counting the Ben Pearson in 1978.

    Thing is, we want to be a part of the bowhunting experience but with only minimal monetary output during the trial period. Unfortunately, that trial period exposes the user to less-than-optimal equipment that doesn't perform or have the same quality as the expensive stuff.

    Have a great trial / learning period. Shoot - talk - congregate - listen - learn - shoot some more. You'll quickly move out of that period and into a new bow is my guess. Make it a GREAT one, like you would with a rifle.

    I found myself a good friend / archery mentor. I do what he says and I have never been let down since.

    Hope this helps. Have lots of fun with that new bow!

    Taylor

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    I worked at the archery counter and those guys there should be able to help you out. Ask for forrest and he should be able to help on a replacement. Sometimes we would talk to the manufacturer and they would just trade parts for parts with no cost. good luck

  10. #10

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    I would take it back regardless!

    On that note my buddy had this happen to him last year from a bow from sportsmens. I honestly dont remember the make/model of his, I'll have to give hima s hout tomorrow and ask, but it was this exact very thing! It took awhile for the RIGHT part to get in (no fault of the bow counter here), and he's back to normal now.

    ps, Forest is in the Fairbanks office, not anchortown

    pss, DO NOT DRY FIRE BOWS!!!! think about it, a compound at HALF draw is almost at its PEAK weight..hmmmm

  11. #11
    Member AK DUX's Avatar
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    I don't get some of the advice guys; lowxposure said he dry-fired the bow...right? So what's with all the "take the bow back and make them fix or replace" type advice? It's not Sportsmans or Alpines fault. That's exactly why Sportsman's or other bow shops don't take bows back....folks dry firing them, they break, then go in complaining about a faulty bow.

    lowxposure...it's good to see someone honest about it & acknowledging it was your mistake and not try screw someone else...even if they're a big, bad corporation. It may be past tense, take it in to Sportsmans and be honest about it. Having worked as a bow tech, I'll bet they'll do whatever they can to fix it or talk to the mfgr for you. If you go in with an obviously dry-fired bow & try to BS them and demand repair or replacement, you won't get jack.

    I'm just saying....
    "We're all here cuz we're not all there"

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