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Thread: What style net for Copper/Chitina?

  1. #1

    Default What style net for Copper/Chitina?

    What stye net for the copper? Will a small hoop landing net (black netting) work? Do I need to gill net my landing net? Or use my rectangle Gill net from B&J? Years ago I used a black landing net style net at Chitina and did great but it was the only trip. I use a large rectangle Gill net for Kasilof. What style is best for the copper? Will my long poles on my smaller landing net work? Should I put gill net on my smaller net or use the big one?

  2. #2
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    Default Nets

    Info from previous post.....most people are of the frame of mind that the king landing nets (black) work just fine. I've dipped there twice and that's what I used, with success. The water is such that the color of the net isn't a factor. I think many folks have said that if you are dipping in a very rocky area, the other type nets sustain lots of damage from hanging up.

  3. #3
    Moderator Paul H's Avatar
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    If you're scooping, then a landing net will be fine. If you're set up in a backeddy, you can use a landing net frame with a gilnet in it. That's the setup I used and it worked well.

  4. #4
    Member 6XLeech's Avatar
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    Default Color, size and shape matter less on the Copper...

    In a previous thread (http://forums.outdoorsdirectory.com/...ad.php?t=31211), contributors brought out good tips for dipnetting - whether salmon or hooligan, Kenai/Kasilof or Chitna, good tips all around-net equipment, fish handling for best meat quality, modifications to gear, electric fillet knives...

    I've never dipnetted at Chitna - doing all my dipping in the Kenai.
    But, most in the thread seemed to agree that color didn't matter at Chitna. The heavily silted water seems to limit visibility too much.

    Shape/size? Many people seem to do fine with smaller nets on the Copper. In any situation where you might be dealing with much current, that would make sense - though it seems most work the back eddies like Paul H mentioned.

    Good luck!

  5. #5
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    Default

    Both will work on the Copper - I prefer the mono-gillnet material as the fish get hung up in it - in fact a significant number of fish we pull out don't even make it into the bag, they bump then get fins/etc tangled up in the mesh, you pull the net into the boat and off the come. Not as durable as typical black mesh, but higher catch rates IMHO - just avoid wrapping them up in the rocks if you can.

  6. #6
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    Default For What It's Worth

    This past weekend I was at Chitina. We were fishing a sandbar near the bridge along with about 8 others. We were in a back eddy not sweeping. OUt of all the nets, maybe 12 total, 3 were gill net and guess which ones caught more fish? The gill nets. I even walked around to see if the gill nets were deeper/ at a differnt part of the back eddy improving thier chances etc, but reality was that all 12 nets were in a line.

    I brough home 2 fish.

    I bought a gill net at Frontier Spoirting Goods yesterday and CANT WAIT to go back.

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    go down canyon, into the narrows, for more fish.

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    Default Yeah I know

    The party I was with were NOT comfortable going past the slide so we made do. I stil say the gill net is the way to go.

  9. #9
    Member Doug in Alaska's Avatar
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    I've used a long solid handled black model for years and it has always worked well, until last year. I was dropped off on a ledge cut into a rock face and it was very difficult to dip with the long handle. Just no way to sweep with my back against the rock face. My son made a trip to Fairbanks two weeks ago so I had him pick up a new net for me from Frontier Sporting Goods. I like the handle extensions because you can adjust the length for the area you fish.

    Same a FairbanksBowHunter, I can't wait to give it a try.
    Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

  10. #10

    Default Black fiberglass poles

    Be advised that over time, a couple of things happen to the black fiberglass poles:

    1. the button hole wears from torque on the net. Eventually, the net hoop slops back and forth.
    2. watch out for cracks developing around the button hole as well. I've had splits in the fiberglass develop running up the length of the pole.

    If you bring some tools with you, you can hacksaw off the end of the pole and drill a new button hole. I've also slipped a smaller diameter metal section inside the end and used SuperStrut connectors to attach the hoop.

    Mostly now I use antenna pole. I've still got one long fiberglass pole left for use in special situations.

    ~tr

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