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Thread: Boning Out Meat

  1. #1

    Default Boning Out Meat

    I'll preface this post with the fact that I am aware of the positives and negatives of boning out vs bone in for meat in the field. Given my druthers, I'd prefer to just deal with quarters bone in, but it's looking more and more likely that I will need to bone out a caribou this fall.

    With that in mind, what is the best way to go about boning out the quarters? I don't want to waste any meat, I want to be able to do it right. Is this something that a local butcher could show me?

    Thanks for any advice you have.

  2. #2
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    Default Meat

    I never bone the quarters unless I have to. Sheep, Goat are boned out. Caribou and moose and black bear are left on the quarters until I get them home or at my base camp. Its not hard to bone them out. Meat keeps better on the bone. I guess it all depends how far your pack is. I prefer to keep them on the bone.

  3. #3

    Default

    Yes, I prefer to keep them on the bone too. However, with the distance involved in this particular hunt, plus a bad knee on my part, boning out will be necessary. So I am trying to learn how to do it.

  4. #4

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    IME the front shoulders are pretty easy, I just follow the shoulder blades and other bones and take it out in as big of chunks as I can.

    If i end up with a few small pieces thats ok too, I still bring them back or cook them that night at camp

    The hindquarters I start up by the tailbone and work my way down towards the leg following as much of the bone as possible. When I get far enough down I pop the leg bone from the hip.

    I'm sure someone else can explain it better than I.....

  5. #5
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    Default

    Pretty much what ak said. When I HAVE to, I use a long, thin bladed knife with some flex that I can get as close to the bond as possible, fol;lowing its contour. The quarters are not difficult, the ribs, neck and between the bones along the spine are more so. Patience is key but boning doesn't take that long.

  6. #6
    Member Knute78's Avatar
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    Although I haven't done a moose or caribou, yet, I have done 50+ deer. Each muscle has its own tissue that seperates it from the other muscles. You can pull the largest muscle in a group apart and with the help of a sharp knife get down to the bone, and then cut/pull the meat from the bone. You can keep most of the muscle groups together if you want, or seperate each one. Knute

  7. #7
    Supporting Member AFHunter's Avatar
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    Default +1 Knute78

    Quote Originally Posted by Knute78 View Post
    Each muscle has its own tissue that seperates it from the other muscles. You can pull the largest muscle in a group apart and with the help of a sharp knife get down to the bone, and then cut/pull the meat from the bone. Knute
    I process all of my own meat at home. I use the same exact technique as Knute78 to cut my meat up into individual muscles. I first take all of the meat off in one large piece without cutting muscle on the hind quarters. The front quarters comes off in one piece by running your blade down both sides of the bone. Once the quarter is de-boned I then take apart every muscle with my fingers and through the slicer/grinder they go.

    I do all of this on a nice clean table at home. I did attempt this in the field once with a moose and the outcome was not as pretty. I ended up with muscles that were cut in half.

    The meat I deboned never crusted over in my game bags. They meat just kept oozing more blood every day. Every other animal I shot we have not deboned and the meat crusted in TAG bags with-in hours.

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