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Thread: Dall Sheep + Pack Rafting

  1. #1

    Default Dall Sheep + Pack Rafting

    Seems like I was doing some research a few weeks ago, and saw some pictures of some folks paddling out from a hunting trip with a doll sheep.

    can't seem to find anything know and cannot rememeber how I googled up the photos.

    Can anybody point me in the right direction ?

  2. #2
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    I dunno, maybe try changing the spelling and see if the results change? I'm at a loss here.

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  4. #4
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    It's Dall not doll. As in Ovis dalli. I fixed it for you.

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    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    You never know maybe he was looking for one of these:

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    Member Mountain Man Jack's Avatar
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    That's hilarious. I knew you guys would be all over it.

  7. #7
    Moderator LuJon's Avatar
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    Speaking of sheep rafting!





    http://traditions.cultural-china.com...tions2720.html

    Makes ya wonder how they blow them up.... I have my theory

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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Speaking of sheep rafting!





    http://traditions.cultural-china.com...tions2720.html

    Makes ya wonder how they blow them up.... I have my theory

    Ah yes! The Ovis Dali Innertubi...

  9. #9

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    I would expect a lot would depend upon what type of gear you are taking and what type of water (class 1 vs 4 rapids) you will need to navigate. Also, how much do you and your gear weigh...plus a sheep? It may be worth some trial runs before you get dropped off 50 miles from the nearest road or landing strip!

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    Member oakman's Avatar
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    I've thought about doing this myself. I even have an area in mind. The challenges in my mind (without knowing much of anything about pack rafting) is you need to bring some extra gear that you normally wouldn't. Namely a raft, paddle, dry suit, life jacket, and probably a helmet if you are being safe. So all that is going to weigh at least 10 pounds. As pointed out above, how much do you and the rest of your gear weigh? What does a sheep (even boned out) weigh?

    I think it could be a great way of just getting the weight off your back. You could line the raft down the river as long as there is a good bank. It might be much easier to walk with a rope rather than a loaded pack.

    Another idea would be to carry just the pack from camp. Then if you kill a sheep you can line the pack and sheep back to camp. This would save you the weight of the paddle, life jacket, etc. and you wouldn't have to worry about being stranded in the middle of nowhere.

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    Member Vince's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LuJon View Post
    Speaking of sheep rafting!





    http://traditions.cultural-china.com...tions2720.html

    Makes ya wonder how they blow them up.... I have my theory
    WELL THEN!!!!!!! at least now we know how it come about refering to the use of Rubber boots while holding onto your sheep!!!!!!!!!
    "If you are on a continuous search to be offended, you will always find what you are looking for; even when it isn't there."

    meet on face book here

  12. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by oakman View Post
    I've thought about doing this myself. I even have an area in mind. The challenges in my mind (without knowing much of anything about pack rafting) is you need to bring some extra gear that you normally wouldn't. Namely a raft, paddle, dry suit, life jacket, and probably a helmet if you are being safe. So all that is going to weigh at least 10 pounds. As pointed out above, how much do you and the rest of your gear weigh? What does a sheep (even boned out) weigh?

    I think it could be a great way of just getting the weight off your back. You could line the raft down the river as long as there is a good bank. It might be much easier to walk with a rope rather than a loaded pack.

    Another idea would be to carry just the pack from camp. Then if you kill a sheep you can line the pack and sheep back to camp. This would save you the weight of the paddle, life jacket, etc. and you wouldn't have to worry about being stranded in the middle of nowhere.
    Yeah my packraft, paddle, and life vest comes to about 8 pounds extra. So it is more weight for sure. I dont bring dry suit, instead I just used my paddle top and bottom that doubles as raingear as my paddle top is a jacket actually with gaskets that can be tightend and loosend as well as have a hood. The most I have had in my packraft is about 75 pounds (comfy packraft camping ) and while it isn't as nimble as just a daypack in the bow, it is plenty mobile and agile to run boney class II+ stuff and dodge rocks. 100+ would be more interesting. So of course it depends on the river/creek you plan to float out (scouting could be beneficial here) but if you go in with 60-65 pounds instead of 50-55 knowing that if you get a sheep you are floating out the 20 some miles then it makes the added weight worth it IMO. Its just another tool to consider and mode of getting around.

  13. #13
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    oakman - You're right that it would end up being close to 10 pounds of extra weight (I don't use a dry suit, though), but extra weight going in isn't too big of a deal to me. It's the weight and time savings on the way out that is the huge advantage. Whereas I might only want to hike in 10 miles if I know I have to hike home with a pack that weighs over 100 pounds, I'd be happy to go 25 miles or more if I knew I was going to float home. These boats can handle a surprising amount of weight in relatively calm water, so I think a pack with gear, a boned out sheep, and a paddler is totally doable for such a hunt. I'm certainly going to try. It'll be a few years before I can make it happen, but it's on my schedule. Hopefully this fall I'll get my feet wet with a packraft black bear hunt, and maybe a goat hunt as well.

  14. #14

    Default Pontoon Style?

    I'm wondering if anyone has ever tried pontoon type rafts similar to Dave Scaddens or Skookum Steelheader?

    Some of these are rated for class 4 rapids and can handle up to 1,000+ lbs. Obviously class 4 rapids with a 500+ lbs load would likely be different than running the same rapid empty but I have a feeling a guy could long line or portage some of the rougher water. Scaddens came out w/a frameless U-shaped pontoon that weighs only 26 lbs and has a capacity of 800 lbs. A similar framed pontoon w/frame tips the scales at 80 lbs with 1,200 lb capacity. I would be curious if anyone has ever tried these or if you think they may work?

  15. #15
    Member Bighorse's Avatar
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    Default Haul out

    The benifit is really in the haul out. I'm really considering a scouting trip into my August Goat area with an inflatable Kayak on my back. I'd leave it stashed and use it to haul out camp and meat. It would save me about 5 miles of heavy packing when I'm tired and spent from climbing mountains.

  16. #16

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    Just a guess, but I think you could haul a lot of weight in a packraft in relatively calm (I-II) water. I used mine on a 2008 moose hunt to cross a lake as opposed to walking around it. I was in the back (I go 185, so with rifle and gear lets say 200 pounds), and my buddy was in the front, and he's 225 if he's a pound. So we had just about 425 pounds in my Denali Llama, and it was stable and fairly easy to paddle across the lake. I wouldn't have hesitated to transport moose quarters across the lake if we had shot one across there.

    I know it's not the same as in current, but you'd also likely have less than 225 pounds in the front.

  17. #17

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    I have personally packrafted out 2 rams (in one trip) with the undecked Alpacka Fjord Explorer in mostly Class I/II water with 2 Class III rapids. I am a good boater and have lots of packraft experience, but the packrafts can handle both a heavy load and whitewater if you know what you are doing. Any of the models will easily carry a hunter plus a pack with a ram on Class II rivers. IMO, its better to put the back in the bottom of the boat when it gets over 100lbs rather than across the bow.

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