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Thread: Packrafts

  1. #1

    Default Packrafts

    How do the following packrafts compare:

    Alpacka (Yukon Yak, or Llama)
    Feathercraft Baylee
    NRS Pack Boat

    It looks like they all are pretty close as far as weight and size, but what about durability?

    Has anyone used any of these or can speak for one over the other?

    I'm looking for a packraft to take on short floats for fishing, longer overland treks, and for sheep hunting.

    Thanks

  2. #2
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I have an Alpacka Denali Llama and I could not be more pleased. It is incredibly tough, having been bounced off of very sharp rocks, trees, and more without so much as a scratch. They're not impenetrable - any inflatable can be punctured - but I have been very impressed thus far. Alpackas have been tested, tweaked, and fine-tuned over more than a decade and have been used to do countless trips across the world. The leading experts in packrafting use Alpackas. That's enough for me, personally.

    I'm sure the other boats are fine, but I'd go with the original. Tough as nails, easy to patch if a puncture happens, light, awesome spray decks, and a company that has been awesome to work with.

  3. #3

    Default Denali Llama

    Thanks Brian, I went ahead and picked up a Denali Llama with attached spray skirt. I can't wait to try it out.

    Do you know any good rivers in the Fairbanks area to break it in? I was thinking maybe the Chena for a daytrip and some catch and release Grayling?

  4. #4
    Forum Admin Brian M's Avatar
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    I think you'll be super happy with the Llama, and it was a very wise choice to get the spray skirt. Most of the folks I have known who didn't get one initially ended up sending their boats back to get one put on after a few floats, even those who just float in calm, placid waters.

    I'm not very familiar with the Fairbanks area, but from what I know of the Chena, it sounds great. Starting in very calm water is a good idea. It's a quick learning curve and you'll be surprised at how well they handle waves, but it's good to start mellow. One thing I've found is that my boat handles much better if I have a 25+ pound pack strapped onto the bow. With no weight in the front it doesn't track as well.

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