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Thread: Investment Firearm

  1. #1
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Default Investment Firearm

    What would you choose as an investment. It has been suggested that a 2nd generation colt 45 would be good. Some model 1911s also look promising. How about a 1903A3?
    Let's hear your ideas!
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  2. #2
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    Older, higher end double rifles or shotguns. But seriously, as an investment? Unless you can buy something for way below it's current value I can't think of any firearm that has serious investment possibilities.
    Tennessee

  3. #3
    Member gunbugs's Avatar
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    Never buy a gun as an investment. Buy a gun because you like it. Choose the one you like the most and shoot it, take care of it, and if you need to down the road , sell it and make a couple bucks.
    "A strong body makes the mind strong. As to the species of exercises, I advise the gun. While this gives moderate exercise to the body, it gives boldness, enterprise, and independence to the mind."

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    Member marshall's Avatar
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    I have a Klondike Gold Rush Commemorative Win 30-30 that was bought in 1975 in Anchorage that I would consider selling. Still in the original box and never fired. If it makes someone feel warm and fuzzy drop me a PM.
    Attached Images Attached Images

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    Supporting Member Amigo Will's Avatar
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    The 60's and 70's were the best time to do it. That said guns like the Ruger Gold Label sell way over original cost just a few years ago
    Now left only to be a turd in the forrest and the circle will be complete.Use me as I have used you

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    Member Nukalpiaq's Avatar
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    Default rifle actions

    I would think that rifle actions would be good investments, especially since you dont see very many of them on the auction sites anymore and when you do the prices have gone up compared to just a few years ago. Every hunter or rifle shooter dreams of having a rifle built or building one.

  7. #7
    Moderator kingfisherktn's Avatar
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    I tell the wife all of my gun purchases are an investment.

  8. #8
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Best I ever did was buy 3 HK rifles new, 1 - 223 & 2 308's Mod 91 and 93 - military style - paid about $400 ea ( I am a dealer - that was wholesale ) and the ban came out and I sold 1 for $1200 - 2 for $1600
    With that said its hard to say anything will go up in value as a investment - however guns do have a tendency to loose little value if maintained well.
    I think if you can buy a good used gun for about 60 - 75% of its new value you have a good chance to at least sell it later at no loss...
    If our gov't gets like Europe and Australia and starts banning certain guns your collection value could go to zero rather fast.
    Choose wisely Grasshopper!

  9. #9

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    Nevermind guns, invest in ammunition that will continue to increase through the years faster than guns.
    It won't be long before a brick of .22's will be $50

  10. #10
    Member BrettAKSCI's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowwolfe View Post
    Older, higher end double rifles or shotguns
    Absolutely right Randy! Nothing and I do mean NOTHING holds value and appreciates like a fine English double rifle....or shotgun. The only way you'll ever lose money on one is if you distroy it without an insurance policy in place or you have to sell it in a hurry at a discounted price to move it. The older it is, the "better" the maker, the higher the grade, the finer and more profuse the engraving, the better the wood, the finer the condition, the better the bores, the more obscure the calibre, the fewer made, and the better the history the more it will be worth and the more it will appreciate!

    Over the years I'll likely stash some money in more of these historical beauties, but I think other "investments" may be better. They're an asset that appreciates which is good, but it doesn't provide passive income like other forms of investment which also appreciate.

    Brett

  11. #11

    Default If you have the money,

    A good example vintage Winchester, Colt or Luger will always appreciate. BUT, you can't use the gun and you may have to keep it for some time for it to gain enough value to be worth it. It is always better to buy a collectible gun that you like, so that you will be happy to just have it in your possession. You also have to find a "deal" on one to really make out on it.
    You have to have enough knowledge of the firearm you buy to know what you are purchasing and that takes time to gain. Usually guns that have lots of factory bells and whistles, engraving, exhibition grade wood and such have a greater value unless the gun is just plain extremely rare and already appreciated. I think one make that already is gaining value are vintage marlins.
    Buying secure bonds and CDs probably are a better way to go if money increase is the only factor.

  12. #12

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    I'd venture to say that anything older with bluing and decent wood is a good investment at the right price. So much stainless, plastic and wonder finish around these days that bluing and good wood will do nothing but get better.

  13. #13
    Member atvalaska's Avatar
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    Post i got a browning '92

    back in the early 80's,used but u would have to look hard to see it. I never put a shot thur it myself..got it for 265.00, sold it for 850.00 last year. So now its off chase'in whitetails down in the states...the worst part was having a gun I never fired...( I got my fix with it's brother, a browning 92' in .44 mag I shoot the heck out of ! )
    WHEN IN DOUBT> THROTTLE OUT.......

  14. #14
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    Doubles or F/A's....

  15. #15
    New member George's Avatar
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    Investment firearm? Tricky business if ownership is banned or if they become really difficult to own. I remember many scoffing at gold/silver investment not that long ago---- about 2000. If they are older, they probably got caught in, or heard of the war stories in the COFFEE SHOP (a good place to NOT get the best advice!) about the "scare" of the 70s-80s. Some were hustled into buying a bunch of silver, hung onto it a while and sold in panic as silver plunged. Hah! Guns are different but I remember similar outcomes for those who didn't buy Colt SAAs in the 60s-70s.... or didn't buy AND/OR hang onto the gold or silver they had. Who's smiling now?

    For guns tho I'd for sure stick with older types that are well known. Condition is huge unless rock solid important, historic provenance comes with the gun. You mentioned one type, the Colt SAA. Yes. But instead of the 2nd Generation I'd lean toward a 1st Generation, Smokeless from around 1900 in top condition in 38-40, 44-40 or 45 C.

  16. #16

    Default Dave Ramsey

    Millionaire Dave Ramsey advocates 1% of your portfolio into guns. More than that he feels is an expensive hobby. Collectibles can easily lose value and generally there is a bigger upside and a bigger down side.

    Many people collect Pre-64 Model 70s and Colt SAAs. Their valuation has climbed above inflation but if you had purchased Japanese Samurai swords with the same concerns for condition, authenticity and function during the Halycon days when the old guns were less in demand you would have basically made 1000% return on your investment. Those days are gone.

    Think about this. 2/3s of all of the Japanese swords in existence were either destroyed or carried back to the US as war trophies after WW2. 90% of those have been returned to Japan or destroyed due to poor care. During the 60s, 70s and 80s most authentic swords could be purchased for $100 per sword or less. These include Juyo token blades of great historical value that are generally worth 100,000 to 4 million per blade.

    Presently in the US there are 21 lost Japanese National Treasures that are each worth more than 500,000 per blade. Blades have now appreciated to the point that the Japanese now try to sell their swords to collectors in the US. The number of high quality blades in the US has crashed. The highest quality Western collectibles are now being purchased by Japanese and Arab collectors and then held in banks or other security offices in the US.

    It is interesting that during every change there are opportunities for collectibles like firearms. I believe that Ramsey's assertation is probably correct. I think that while old English Double rifles in best condition will probably retain their value the new products on the market are going to significantly lower the value of newly manufactured European and Domestically produced doubles.

    The problem with firearms as an investment is that they are kind of like selling your child when it comes to selling it off.

    Sincerely,
    Thomas

  17. #17
    New member George's Avatar
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    kaboku68, gotta agree with that. I know in my gut that either a high end double rifle or a high end Japanese blade are top-o-the-top arms investments. The only problem is the true "investment grades" among them are in the 5-6 figure category. That in turn says the market is somewhat slim and has to be international- out of my cricle of acquaintances for certain. Like most of us, I'll just have to dream

  18. #18
    Member martentrapper's Avatar
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    Each issue of American Rifleman has an "old gun" on the last page. These old guns, rifles, pistols, shotguns, are invariably woth more today than they were new. Many are military guns.
    I think there is ample opportunity to buy guns that will increase in value.
    I can't help being a lazy, dumb, weekend warrior.......I have a JOB!
    I have less friends now!!

  19. #19
    Member RMiller's Avatar
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    Just like any other investment remember the saying , you make money when you buy not when you sell.

    If you cant make money on it as soon as you buy it then its not really that good of a deal. Most items that appreciate rarely outpace inflation.

    I bought a winchester once for 800 that I sold for 1200 two months later but I was watching them go up and down in price like the stock market on gunbroker. When one came up for sale that I knew was a steal I bought it.

    To just buy a rifle now and expect to make anything more than market price on them later I would expect to be very difficult.
    "You have given out too much reputation in the last 24 hours, try again later".

  20. #20
    Moderator hunt_ak's Avatar
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    RMiller...wow, been a while...

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