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Thread: Shots to Remember!

  1. #1
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Default Shots to Remember!

    Ok, anybody that has hunted very long has a "few" special shots that seem to stick in ones head, how about sharing!
    I will go back, well maybe wayyy back, to age 19. Hunting deer & pheasant in South Dakota. I was with 2 chaps - one was blocking a large grassy draw with rifle for deer, other was walking near me with shotgun for birds! I was packing a Rem 700 ADL, 6mm w/6X redfield scope.
    A whitetail buck stands up on a far hill, Steve says "there's a buck, but he's too far away" - Hmmm, I pull up and shoot offhand - deer runs & I jack another in and bang and buck disappears. Steve ( the adult ) gives me grief - kid that was too far - blah blah blah. I said "we'll see"!
    430 steps later I have my hands on a small 8 point buck, one thru the lungs, one thru the hips! Wanna help me drag this puppy out Steve I said with a smirk!
    Whats one of your cool shot stories?

  2. #2

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    I've made a couple good shots I guess on some animals. But if you have hunted long enough you have missed a time or two and my one miss sure sticks with me more than all my kill shots. Wish it were the other way around, but probably for the best that I remember the miss to keep me practicing diligently.

  3. #3
    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Alaska_Lanche View Post
    I've made a couple good shots I guess on some animals. But if you have hunted long enough you have missed a time or two and my one miss sure sticks with me more than all my kill shots. Wish it were the other way around, but probably for the best that I remember the miss to keep me practicing diligently.
    OK, how about sharing the "miss" story!
    I have my share of those also!

  4. #4

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    That's why I love archery, you get to be in such close range with the animals that the shots stick out in your mind. One of my favorites was shooting a brown bear on the beach at less than 8 yards. Seeing that arrow hit perfectly was a great feeling.

    I have done a wing and a prayer shot on caribou at long range, about 400 yards, and I knocked two down in three shots. I was never much into long range shooting at animals, but it was a good feeling to knock them down at that distance. It was the first time I concentrated on windage, elevation and distance and both shots were one shot kills in the lungs with one clean miss low. It's a different type of challenge, and I much prefer stalking in as close as possible over shooting from long range.

  5. #5

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    Probably my best shot was a moose at 338 yards (according to the rangefinder) with my .338 ironically enough. It was slipping in and out of the trees and finally go to a shooting lane and stopped. So I aimed for the top of its back with a 180 noslers and it drop right there in its tracks.

    Now for the one that will haunt me till the day I die. my buddies were out filling up the boat and I was left on shore at camp. They looked back at camp while they were topping off the gas for the boat and told me there was a bear walking into camp. My bow (didn't bring a rifle on the trip) was on the boat, but my buddy had his rifle in the tent so I ran and grabbed it and settle in for a gimmie 100 yard shot. Well it must have been the biggest jerk or flinch ever as I completely missed the bear, I mean hit dirt next to him kind of miss!!! So yeah not my proudest moment, but one to learn from for sure and re-enforce why practice is so important.

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Jerod,
    I have a love of archery as well, shot just about every critter I have been able to hunt first with a bow and later with a gun....
    I will never forget best whitetail I ever had a chance at - easily a B & C 200 point animal - chased for 3 seasons - I blew an 11yd shot!
    Bought a laser site and installed it one evening - sited it dead at 20 yds from the ground. Next morning I had a raccoon walk by at about 15yds- predawn, and thought great I'll check this out. Pressed the button and red dot was on coon - zip - arrow hit high over his back. I thought OK, glad the reg sites are also on the bow as this has a learning curve.
    Hung bow in tree - about an hour later 2 does run in and the big boy was hot on their trail. Finally had my shot - perfect quarter away - smooth release and I watched the arrow bounce sideways off the buck!
    Upon inspection I saw my plastic arrow rest cocked off to the side radically - only conclusion was when I put bow back in the hook with arrow knocked it must have fallen off and rested between riser and rest - I was so focused on Mr Big I never saw it. That was definetly a shot I will never forget - what a monster!

  7. #7
    Member c04hoosier's Avatar
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    Probably my most memorable shot was on a small, ugly 5-point whitetail (5 points total, not western standards). It wasn't a long shot per se, at about 75-80 yards with a 12 gauge slug gun. What was memorable about it was the position I had to be in to make the shot. I was walking in to my hunting area, and I happened to see this little buck standing EXACTLY where I had planned to sit. Somehow he happened to stand there long enough for me to take my scope covers off. Then I tried kneeling to get steadier, but there was too much brush in the way. Then I tried offhand, but again, too much brush in the way. The only position I could get a clear shot from was a semi-squat. Not comfortable, but the crosshairs were pretty steady so I took the shot. One slug through the lungs did the trick.

    The other most memorable was on the caribou in my avatar. Haul Road (5.5 miles from it actually), late October. We had seen the herd for about 2 miles, and luckily they were just far enough off the road. We snuck over a little knoll and this ol' boy was 398 yards off. I almost didn't take the shot, but figured he didn't have anywhere to hide if follow up shots were required. I was shooting a .300 Wby with 180 gr Core-lokt handloads, and knew the load well. So I took the shot. First shot hit him (I could hear the "thunk"), but I gave him a second one anyway, and he went straight down. Then I got to experience the joy of hauling him out of there, but that is another story!

  8. #8

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    My most memorable shots are archery misses as well.

    I was hunting in the Kaibab National Forrest. My hunting partner and I usually split up to hunt but on this day we ran into each other about mid morning. It started to rain hard so we huddled under some pine trees. The rain slacked off but it was cold so I was still. I put an arrow on the bow to pull it back a few times to limber up. I came to full draw, and saw a three point buck in a small ravine 10 yards away from me! I shot clean over his back.

  9. #9

    Default Memorable and LUCKY!!!

    Mine was probably the luckiest shot I have ever taken. Antelope hunting in Wyoming with my father in law and some friends. We were making our way through this open pasture and spotted three of them a good ways out. My buddy pulled out his rifle and took a shot...well none of them dropped and I thought what the heck. I put my trusty Browning 300 WinMag on the bipod and got steady....found them in the scope as they were running diagnol from us....led it just enough...pulled the trigger and it dropped out of my scope. Didn't know if I got it or not....ended up on the ground. The shot was 413 yards away and they were running full tilt. That is my most memorable....and LUCKIEST shot I have ever had.
    "Shoot straight and keep your powder dry"

  10. #10

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    Most memorable shot: I was about 15 and shot my first descent buck back in Kansas. It was a "missed him so bad I got him" shot. Right into the eye and into the brain with no exit, no meat or cape damage. Dropped him like a rock at about 225 yards. I was bragging up my shootting skills to my gramps the whole walk out to retrieve the deer. Once there we couldn't find an exit or entry hole anywhere, and then my gramps spots it. Oh man did he let me have it about my shooting skills! I vividly remember shaking like a leaf when I took that shot. Of course at that point we gut it out, load it up in the truck and head to the coffee shop so he could show his buddies my unbelievable skills.

    Most memorable miss: After hunting hard for a full season to take a pronghorn by spot and stalk I finally played my cards right. I took an old black angus tanned hide and crawled about 500 yards with my bow through the middle of a spread out herd of about 20 heifers. It takes me about an hour to cover the distance as I would stop, mill around, change directions etc. Finally I get to the side of this little hill where the goat was hanging out on the backside. All of a sudden the SOB turns the corner and is about 5 yards away looking straight into my eyes. I pull back on my bow and the friggin arrow falls off the rest. bye bye pronghorn. Man that day haunted me for years. I should have just lunged at him as I could have grabbed his horns! I shot that bow in a league during the previous winter, and countless times out in the backyard. Never did an arrow fall off the rest. I learned two things from that, one is to practice like you would shoot, (on your knees, leaning behind a bush etc) and the second is that stuff happens while out and about and there is nothing you can do about it.

  11. #11

    Default Best and Worst

    Shot a lot of caribou, deer, elk, pheasants and quail, but my best shot and my worst shots (plural) were on the same animal. It was on a lowly little jack rabbit when I was about 15-16 years old. I was rabbit hunting in New Mexico with my younger brother and my best friend. In those days we had a couple of single shot shotguns for close range and one .22 semi-auto (Nylon 66) for longer shots. I was carrying the .22. We had jumped a couple of jack rabbits and were able to get one. We jumped another jack pretty far out (50+ yards)and whistled at it. It stopped and presented me with a great broadside at about 60-65 yards. Very makeable even with the iron sights. I took a knee and got a really solid rest and proceeded to miss. This brought the usual ribbing from my two loyal side-kicks which frustrated the crap out of me. The rabbit took off, and I took a couple more shots which missed even worse than the first one. This really got them to hammering me. In those days amunition was precious, but I kept firing away. At least 2-3 more times. Finally, at about 300 yards (in my dreams) I let another one go. The rabbit proceeded to start doing cart wheels.

    We stepped it off and it was 165 yards. Obviously, pure luck, but it made for some great "get even" comments. When we got to the rabbit, it was a head shot, thus the cart wheels. I still have great memories of that shot.

  12. #12
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default Great Thread

    Hi Smokey,

    When you've hunted 60+ years (as I have) - you can tell stories by the hundreds.

    Two of my most memorable shots have been at Wyoming pronghorns but a shot that killed a doe whitetail stands out also. This was back when shotgun slugs were just that and I carried a smoothbore 870 with a white bead on the front and no back sight. Seven does came running through a goldenrod field and I took a whack at the biggest one. At about 60 yards I hit her through the brain. PURE LUCK.

    I would like to say some of my most memorable shots were at Alaskan game but most have been pretty mundane. I do have 1 story about a Mulchatna caribou - maybe 15 or so years ago. I was hunting downstream from camp and saw this lone bull start across the river. I figured I would never see him again when I heard him walking upstream so he would go DIRECTLY below me. Great. I flattened him at maybe 50 feet but I didn't calculate the slope and watched as my caribou (now dead) gently slid down the bank, into the Mulchatna, & down steam toward Bristol Bay.

    Long story short - he hung up on some ripples, I stripped from my feet UP to my waist (not a pretty sight) and retrieved him. We picked him up on our float downstream.
    Last edited by Phil; 06-11-2010 at 17:27. Reason: poor typing skills

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    Member bigswede358's Avatar
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    My best shot happened when i was 14 years old. It was late in the morning, I was watching a long clearing above the old hay field by my grandparents house. I had my 700 ADL 30-06. I was enjoying the morning, when i heard galloping right behind me. I jumped up, swung my rifle, and fired 2 consecutive shots at a big 4-point whitetail (an Idaho 4x4). He was about 25 feet away at the most. He ran about 50 yds and piled up in the lodgepole. I had my first deer down, and a nice buck at that. It wasn't a long shot or my biggest animal. But it was my best shot.
    LIVE TO HUNT....HUNT TO LIVE!!!!

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Some great stories guys - I think these are really what our hunting is about - memories that last a lifetime! How many hunts went smooth and no hiccups and we barely can remember them?
    Phil, I agree, at 53 I have sooo many that I could go into - man life goes by way too quick!
    OK, I know there are some surfers with some great stories - jump in and get your feet wet - nobody's gonna raz ya on this thread as we have all been there ourselves!
    There's gotta be some griz stories - like " I was running backwards, slipping in, well you know, my own do do, and one shot with the 44 mag between the eyes!

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    For myself, Walking on the Kobuk River one Fall after freeze up and thousands of Fat Caribou Cows were running by in groups,migrating North. I was on my way to my snow machine with a couple gallons of gas as I had run out about a mile outta town, when three local boys pulled up on two snowgos and started to talk to me, and offer'd me a ride. We were just getting my ride idleing, when a herd pourd down the opposite sides steep bank and the ran tward us on the river, about 300 Caribou.
    As the guys ripped open pack sacks, then ammo box's and stuffed rifles, I dropped 5 with 5 shots with my .243 4 of them at less than 100 yards...........not one single word outta any of them about what I did, but I know, they all watched me, cause none finished loading his gun or took a shot and each one examined and reexamined my rifle when I strolled out to work those Meats

    Mostly I enjoy hunting with my sons. Watching them score is interesting...........and now my wifes been pretty interestin'......hunting wize
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

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    Member Smokey's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by strangerinastrangeland View Post
    For myself, Walking on the Kobuk River one Fall after freeze up and thousands of Fat Caribou Cows were running by in groups,migrating North. I was on my way to my snow machine with a couple gallons of gas as I had run out about a mile outta town, when three local boys pulled up on two snowgos and started to talk to me, and offer'd me a ride. We were just getting my ride idleing, when a herd pourd down the opposite sides steep bank and the ran tward us on the river, about 300 Caribou.
    As the guys ripped open pack sacks, then ammo box's and stuffed rifles, I dropped 5 with 5 shots with my .243 4 of them at less than 100 yards...........not one single word outta any of them about what I did, but I know, they all watched me, cause none finished loading his gun or took a shot and each one examined and reexamined my rifle when I strolled out to work those Meats


    Mostly I enjoy hunting with my sons. Watching them score is interesting...........and now my wifes been pretty interestin'......hunting wize
    Nice...
    What brand of gun was that 243 and was it open sights?

  17. #17

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    Haul road Caribou. Stalking three bulls on a hill. They were both looking in my direction, so I was wondering how to make the final stalk. Didn't know a black wolf was stalking them at the same time. Was pretty cool when he jumped up and ran two right to me. I shot the one on a dead run at 20 yards, hit him in the back spine. That was sure a lucky shot! The wolf stood their for what seemed like forever trying to figure out what that loud bang was I guess. Looking back I should have shot him too. But the way it worked out at the time I thought it was cool we were both hunting for food.

  18. #18
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    Remington 700 ADL with a 4 rd mag, open, modifyed sights.
    100grn. coreloks, every day.
    I file the rear sight flat with a "U" notch and the front post loses that stupid bead that always gets knocked to one side and I use the fine blade.
    Cut off the comb and cheek peice, slimmed the forestock up, shortend the butt 2 inches as I wear lotsa cloths, and tuned the trigger to 2-1/2 lbs.
    I have another Rem700 heavy barrel witha nice Leupold in .308 and a composite stock and no open sights, so I havent used it since I sighted it in with a couple box's of Rem ammo. I just dont use scopes.

    I lost that ADL flipping a boat on a dead head in the river. I miss and still think about that rifle.

    I used to shoot Biathlon in High School, I did very well then too.

    Way to go, Moose Knuckle...I probly would have let 'em go too, if we(The Wolf and I) were both in on the hunt
    If you can't Kill it with a 30-06, you should Hide.

    "Dam it all", The Beaver told me.....

  19. #19
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    Well, one remembers the most painful and the happier experiences. The ones in between are usually forgotten. I clearly remember the first time I killed a moose. It was the 13th day of the season, with about an inch of ice and snow on the ground somewhere near the Elliott Highway. I had been waiting all morning for any bull to show itself on a cat trail left behind from an old wildfire on the side of a mountain. By 1:00 PM I decided to go back to my campsite and have a meal while warming by the fire. I returned to my hunting spot by 2:00 PM, and again watched for a moose to walk on an animal trail that crisscrossed the cat trail, perhaps 300 yards down from where I sat on a small chair.

    15 or so minutes later, I see this bull walking up the mountain, and then turning on the trail. As you can imagine, my heart jumped to my throat, and I thought I would die of a heart attack. That excited I got The moose turned to its right, and by then I had supported my "braked" .338WM rifle on a branch of a small spruce in front of me. I though that the moose was too far, and forgot to aim a little low (the grade was a little steep). I fired once, and then twice. I clearly heard the "thump" of the second shot as it hit the moose, but my left ear was ringing like crazy! I was so excited that I could not even think of sliding the Peltor Tactical 6S that rested on my hat over my ears.

    The moose stood there like nothing had happened and looking at me, and then started walking away on the trail. I ran down a little on the soft moss, my heart pounding like I was going to barf it out my mouth, and managed to take another shot at the moose while watching the riflescope's cross-hairs moving up and down from the moose's knees to to its hump. By then I was completely deaf on my left ear, and to make matters worst, I had forgotten to keep my left eye open. So when recovering from the rifle's recoil the moose was gone in thin air!

    I cursed myself several times for injuring the moose, and the prospect of having to track it down the mountain (something that I had never done before), and worst of all...something that I had dreaded to do in bear country (I was quite a chicken back then). Anyways, I walked down the mountain and turned left on the trail looking for some sign (anything that would point toward the injured moose), which by the way, I had not idea what "anything" could be I crossed the animal trail and continue down the mountain, and all of the sudden I heard a grunt to my right (near the spot I had shot the moose the first time). I turned in that direction, and saw the moose still very much alive in a depression or shallow hole in the moss, on its side. It was trying to get up, but it couldn't because both front legs were broken just above the knees. I realized that I was already too close, so I moved back a little, unholstered my .454 Casull to shoot it on the head, but no matter what I did i could not hold the handgun steady enough (20 yards away) to shoot the moose on the head. I still didn't think of wearing my ear muffs!

    I moved back, rested my rifle on a tree, and took two shots at the back of the moose's head. The second shot connected, and the tiny antlers just moved down when the bullet hit.-------

    The moose was finally dead, and so my left ear. While skinning and quartering the moose, my hunting partner had to scream at me so I could hear, and it took a couple of weeks for the hearing at my left side to return to normal.

    Yes, I have never forgotten that hunt.

  20. #20
    Member Phil's Avatar
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    Default One More

    I promise this will be my last one and it isn't so much about the shot. The picture in my avatar is of a blacktail that I took in 2009 - in Alaska. It was my attempt at being a "trophy hunter". I passed (many times) on a 3 x 3 the day before and I had chased a "steer deer" for a long time before I saw this guy.

    The "worth remembering" part was just as I laid my pack on the grass for an easy 150 yard shot. I was alone, about 3 miles from camp, and it was fixing to rain. I distinctly remember saying to myself "You are going to regret this". Then I killed the deer.

    I was right. The deer fell in a place where "level" was not an option. I boned him out and took some of the meat to a spot where it was very obvious & then I started for camp. By then it was raining. Fortunately my buddy came along shortly and offered to pack the rest of the meat - so, I didn't regret the shot nearly as much as I thought I might.

    BTW, the deer scored 95 and it needed to be 100 to make the B & C list.

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