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Thread: Boat size for 60/40?

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    Default Boat size for 60/40?

    Well I finally got to test drive an outboard jet. Man they sure will go shallow. The rig was an .080" flatbottom 1752 Blazer jet boat made in Missouri, the motor a Mercury 60/40 four stroke. With three guys in the boat we were running through shallows that the gravel would tickle the bottom of the boat. The handling was a little different than a prop, but similar I thought. When I set out to get a setup I was first thinking nothing smaller than a 1752, now that I saw one up close I'm starting to think maybe something smaller. The river I run isn't very big and my current boat is a Seaark 1448. I kinda leaning toward a 1652, 1552 or even a 1648. Now that I got to see the Blazer boat and compare it to an Alweld I think the Alweld has them beat in craftsmanship and quailty. I'm pretty sure I don't want any thing less than a 60/40, but that Merc motor is pretty large, and after I saw how much smaller the 60 Etec looked I'm kinda leaning toward that motor a little. I know the weight between the two motors isn't much (Etec being a little lighter) just the physical size is quiet a bit smaller. I guess my questions are what is the smallest boat you guys would recommed putting a 60/40 on? Would you go with .080" hull vs the .100" to save weight? How does the Etec 60/40 compare to the Merc motor?

    Thanks.

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    I've got a 60/40 on a plain jane 18 foot lund and it scoots it along fantastically. But, it's a light boat, thin skin, and no extra heavy goodies which is what I prefer.

    If I was in place where big water wasn't encountered (not my situation) and was looking for a good flatbottom, it is going to depend on what you are going to do with it. If you are going to haul a ton of weight, then the lighter the better as the more the boat itself weighs, the less your payload with decent handling. If you are planning light loads, it can be nice to get the heavier goodies like flooring and swivel seats and all that. I've got buddies that picked up thicker, and floored 17.5 foot boats out where I'm at, and while they run great with light to medium loads, they aren't as nimble as you would get with a plain old jon boat. Jet boats are all about getting up on step quick, sliding well, and being responsive to changing conditions....this requires you to conserve as much of that 40 hp as you can so turning that throttle actually does something, a dog of a jetboat is about the most disappointing thing I could imagine.


    Also, if you intend to encounter plenty of jagged rocks, a thicker skin would be warranted. but, as I see it says kentucky, there have got to be workable 18 foot plain jon's sticking out in every other guy's yard that you could pick up and slap that thing on and save yourself the cash (unless you've got plenty....then tear it up and get somethin pretty).

    Also, going too small can be an issue. What matters more than length is how much planing surface you ahve to help float the boat up as you jet forward. I'd take a wide sixteen foot over a skinny 19 anyday, as you will draft less, slide better and just generally enjoy a sporty ride instead of carving your way around corners.

    Case in point, I got to drive a 40/30 on this little bitty 14 foot Hydro Lite...it was a sweet lookin aluminum plate boat and it looked pretty slick compared to the beat up but wide sixteen footer I was in with essentially the same motor. I really though it was gonna be the bees knees when I took her out, but it was terrible. It carved through all the corners due to it's narrow beam, and drafted way too much. To the point that these guys could not drive it well enough to get as far up that river as I did in a properly balanced rig, no matter what they did...and these guys could drive.

    Many others here may be more familiar with the boats you are talking about, but in the end the motor is what matters in jetboats as far as being nice, dependable and shiny. The boat is probably gonna take some smacks and as long as it's the right size and doesn't leak, I'd save the thousands you could spend and just find a decent 17 or 18 foot jon in some old guys backyard that took it crappie fishin on sundays and put that jet on it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Catch It View Post
    Also, if you intend to encounter plenty of jagged rocks, a thicker skin would be warranted. but, as I see it says kentucky, there have got to be workable 18 foot plain jon's sticking out in every other guy's yard that you could pick up and slap that thing on and save yourself the cash (unless you've got plenty....then tear it up and get somethin pretty).

    I'd take a wide sixteen foot over a skinny 19 anyday, as you will draft less, slide better and just generally enjoy a sporty ride instead of carving your way around corners.
    You usually see a jon boats in the 12ft to 14ft range around here, some 16ft and I don't think I've ever seen an 18ft.

    Plenty of rocks thats why I'm keeping an opened mind about the .100".

    Now when you say a wide 16ft about how wide are we talking 48", 52" or wider?

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    Not really sure on the width, not a big specs guy, but definitely wider than four feet. I'll do a quick search and post.

    If ya got rocks, then the thicker hull is a good call, gravel is pretty kind but the pointy ones will open your boat like a can of soup.

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    one with floors and open area

    http://www.akmining.com/boat/lor1760m.htm

    one without (regular bench seats)

    http://www.akmining.com/boat/lo18oj.htm

    These are just examples, I don't have a serious preference on the brand, that would depend on what you can get and want and can afford where you are. But these are the two basic hull types that would do pretty well with that motor.

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    I have the 1652 alweld .100. If I had it to do again I would go wider. Width is huge...= more planing surface=less depth

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    G3 Boat... 1656 CCJ (Center Console with a jet tunnel) is a Nice Rig!

    Brian

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    1652 g3 with 60/40 yam. is biggest boat i would go with that motor. it does in the low 20's mph and wouldnt be great with more than three people.

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    I have a Yamaha 60/40 on an 18' x 60" bottom Lowe jon boat. I can easily take 4 adult passengers plus myself, a couple of dogs, and reasonable gear. The only thing I wish is that the motor was lighter. It weighs down the rear end of my boat. I wouldn't want that much weight on the transom of anything smaller, at least when talking about riveted jon boats.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I have a Yamaha 60/40 on an 18' x 60" bottom Lowe jon boat. I can easily take 4 adult passengers plus myself, a couple of dogs, and reasonable gear. The only thing I wish is that the motor was lighter. It weighs down the rear end of my boat. I wouldn't want that much weight on the transom of anything smaller, at least when talking about riveted jon boats.

    That's sounds like a nice rig, My 60/40 Yam on an 18 foot lund will do 29 (gps speed)with two people and fishin stuff, 26 with a moderate load, and 21 loaded to the gills (moose, big hunting buddy, camping stuff etc.) But, she won't handle quite as shallow of stuff due to the short slides that even an old flatbacked lund offers you. But I'm happy with it for where I am.

    Jet's are so finicky on weight and load balance, it doesn't take much of an overdo on the size of the boat and you can be unhappy with the results. So to get the most out of that motor, I'd go with a no frills, wide bottom,

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I have a Yamaha 60/40 on an 18' x 60" bottom Lowe jon boat. I can easily take 4 adult passengers plus myself, a couple of dogs, and reasonable gear. The only thing I wish is that the motor was lighter. It weighs down the rear end of my boat. I wouldn't want that much weight on the transom of anything smaller, at least when talking about riveted jon boats.
    Mr. Pid, is your 1860 a rivited boat? Thats a good load you can haul. I know what you mean about the weight of the motors. I sure wish they were about 100lbs lighter.

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    Default 60/40

    It's all about planing surface's i have run many many different hulls for shallow water all thith 50/35 or 60/40 jets. A 18 foot boat performs twice that of an 16 foot boat....An 1848 or an 1852 are ideal. Just like everything there are trade off's. Every pound more that your boat weighs is one less pound you can put in it. I run riveted lowe boats because they are light. The same models welded weigh over twice as much. I tunnel them and extend the back of the boat out 10 inches to get back the displacement lost by a tunnel. Also this compensates for the heavier four strokes. If your looking at a e-tec you should look again they weigh more than a four stroke. My boats are lean though and do not have creature comforts you can get with welded boats.....But I hauled 3 250lb men, a moose and a quarter on the bone out of the yukon with it this year. I challange anyone to biuld or produce a boat that will run shallower period....with an outboard.

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    E-tec, pffftt. Don't get yourself suckered into the E-tec hype!
    The emphasis is on accuracy, not power!

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnhuntak View Post
    It's all about planing surface's i have run many many different hulls for shallow water all thith 50/35 or 60/40 jets. A 18 foot boat performs twice that of an 16 foot boat....An 1848 or an 1852 are ideal. Just like everything there are trade off's. Every pound more that your boat weighs is one less pound you can put in it. I run riveted lowe boats because they are light. The same models welded weigh over twice as much. I tunnel them and extend the back of the boat out 10 inches to get back the displacement lost by a tunnel. Also this compensates for the heavier four strokes. If your looking at a e-tec you should look again they weigh more than a four stroke. My boats are lean though and do not have creature comforts you can get with welded boats.....But I hauled 3 250lb men, a moose and a quarter on the bone out of the yukon with it this year. I challange anyone to biuld or produce a boat that will run shallower period....with an outboard.
    I'm looking at the Lowe website and kinda wondering how accurate their specs are? The riveted 1852 you're talking about weights 475lbs according to the website. I also checked the Alweld site and their 1852 weights 400lbs. Something doesn't add up the Lowe is a .072" thick hull and the Alweld is .100". I know the Lowe can't weight that much. Even their 1448 weights 365lbs and that doesn't sound right, my SeaArk 1448 at .072" only weights 235lbs. Are you doing the tunneling yourself? Is there any way you could post a picture of the tunnel? I very interested.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MARV1 View Post
    E-tec, pffftt. Don't get yourself suckered into the E-tec hype!
    I think I've alreadly fell off the band wagon.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Pid View Post
    I have a Yamaha 60/40 on an 18' x 60" bottom Lowe jon boat. I can easily take 4 adult passengers plus myself, a couple of dogs, and reasonable gear. The only thing I wish is that the motor was lighter. It weighs down the rear end of my boat. I wouldn't want that much weight on the transom of anything smaller, at least when talking about riveted jon boats.
    Are you sure thats not a 115/80 on that LOWE? LOL!

    Brian

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    Default 60/40

    It us an older lowe but you can still get the OLYMPIC John with no v nose. They claim 385 lbs. The tunnel welded boat version is over 900 becauuse the thicker aluminum. Yes I put my own tunnels in because I believe they work better than the factory tunnels. I also run long shaft outboards so I can stand while I drive instead of looking at the back of everones head. I put a pole in to hang onto while I am driving standing up

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    I better go check again but I think it's a 60.... Lol

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    Quote Originally Posted by fishnhuntak View Post
    I better go check again but I think it's a 60.... Lol
    Yes, please do.

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    [QUOTE=Tbradley;751811]Well I finally got to test drive an outboard jet. Man they sure will go shallow. The rig was an .080" flatbottom 1752 Blazer jet boat made in Missouri, the motor a Mercury 60/40 four stroke. With three guys in the boat we were running through shallows that the gravel would tickle the bottom of the boat. The handling was a little different than a prop, but similar I thought. When I set out to get a setup I was first thinking nothing smaller than a 1752, now that I saw one up close I'm starting to think maybe something smaller. The river I run isn't very big and my current boat is a Seaark 1448. I kinda leaning toward a 1652, 1552 or even a 1648. Now that I got to see the Blazer boat and compare it to an Alweld I think the Alweld has them beat in craftsmanship and quailty. I'm pretty sure I don't want any thing less than a 60/40, but that Merc motor is pretty large, and after I saw how much smaller the 60 Etec looked I'm kinda leaning toward that motor a little. I know the weight between the two motors isn't much (Etec being a little lighter) just the physical size is quiet a bit smaller. I guess my questions are what is the smallest boat you guys would recommed putting a 60/40 on? Would you go with .080" hull vs the .100" to save weight? How does the Etec 60/40 compare to the Merc motor?
    IMG_1741.jpg
    Thanks.[/QUOTE
    ive got a 09 60/40 4 stroke merc,i love it,its on a 1652 seaarkkk,no tunnel,2 guys light gear 31.6 on gps ran 122 miles on 19 gallons of fuel,got on step with 2 guys and a whole moose no problem,,

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